Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
Page 1
  • moggins
    • #2
    • 22nd Feb 05, 10:12 AM
    • #2
    • 22nd Feb 05, 10:12 AM
    You can actually make these yourself very cheaply.

    You need a sheet of cardboard slightly smaller than the radiator, some of those polystyrene ceiling tiles and some tin foil.

    I've made these very successfully in the past when we lived in a mobile home and all the heating was going straight through the wall. I might just make a few again and see if I can cut my currently high bills down a bit
    Organised people are just too lazy to look for things

    F U Fund currently at £250
  • Peter-Pan
    • #3
    • 22nd Feb 05, 11:31 AM
    • #3
    • 22nd Feb 05, 11:31 AM
    I got mine at screwfix.com and pretty cheap for a big roll done 5 radiators
  • Queenie
    • #4
    • 22nd Feb 05, 11:46 AM
    • #4
    • 22nd Feb 05, 11:46 AM
    You can actually make these yourself very cheaply.

    You need a sheet of cardboard slightly smaller than the radiator, some of those polystyrene ceiling tiles and some tin foil.

    I've made these very successfully in the past when we lived in a mobile home and all the heating was going straight through the wall. I might just make a few again and see if I can cut my currently high bills down a bit
    by moggins
    Thanks, moggins!!! I shall get the kids to "help" make these (be a good chance to recap with them on energy saving too )
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PMS Pot: £57.53 Pigsback Pot: £23.00
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
  • moggins
    • #5
    • 22nd Feb 05, 11:51 AM
    • #5
    • 22nd Feb 05, 11:51 AM
    Glad I could help, the turkey foil that we always have left over after christmas works best as it's wider and you have to remember to have the shiny side facing out
    Organised people are just too lazy to look for things

    F U Fund currently at £250
  • Rokko
    • #6
    • 19th Dec 08, 9:33 PM
    • #6
    • 19th Dec 08, 9:33 PM
    The makeshift foil solution might work for a few days but will quickly loose its reflective properties. I have found a product that is better that all ones that are currently stocked in diy stores and according to its British Board of Agrement certificate it will last up to 60 years. I found it on a energy research site.
  • moonrakerz
    • #7
    • 20th Dec 08, 9:21 AM
    • #7
    • 20th Dec 08, 9:21 AM
    Glad I could help, the turkey foil that we always have left over after christmas works best as it's wider and you have to remember to have the shiny side facing out
    Originally posted by moggins
    .........and when the radiator gets hot you get a wonderful smell of roasting turkey !
  • starstruck32
    • #8
    • 16th Jan 09, 6:48 AM
    Radiator Reflector Panels
    • #8
    • 16th Jan 09, 6:48 AM
    The makeshift foil solution might work for a few days but will quickly loose its reflective properties. I have found a product that is better that all ones that are currently stocked in diy stores and according to its British Board of Agrement certificate it will last up to 60 years. I found it on a energy research site.
    Originally posted by Rokko
    Would it be possible for you to provide more info, I've tried to find the info myself but failed miserably. :confused: Any help would be great.
  • she grinch
    • #9
    • 16th Jan 09, 6:53 AM
    • #9
    • 16th Jan 09, 6:53 AM
    Does anyone know of a reasonably cheap place to buy good quality radiator reflector panels (the PVC ones coated in aluminium).

    I haven't seen them in my local B&Q or Homebase.
    Originally posted by mbspuk
    My Homebase sells them, they are in the plumbing aisle, also on the homebase website you find it under radiator accessories called reflectafoam.
    Pucker up and kiss it Whoville! - The Grinch
  • wallbash
    This thread smells not of Turkey but spam!

    Slight gap of TWO years between posting and reply by Rokko :rolleyes:

    Quote ... but will quickly loose its reflective ......... NO !


    Save money , use the Turkey foil. Yes Its sold in Homebase/BQ etc but the amount using of energy saved /against cost is not viable.
    • londoner2009
    • By londoner2009 30th Nov 09, 1:43 PM
    • 57 Posts
    • 8 Thanks
    londoner2009
    The makeshift foil solution might work for a few days but will quickly loose its reflective properties. I have found a product that is better that all ones that are currently stocked in diy stores and according to its British Board of Agrement certificate it will last up to 60 years. I found it on a energy research site.
    Originally posted by Rokko
    That's a pretty non useful post

    It would have been nice if you said what the product was called or where to buy it from.
    • keith969
    • By keith969 16th Mar 10, 4:29 PM
    • 1,050 Posts
    • 705 Thanks
    keith969
    Spam, lovely Spam!
    Days are made with waterfall colours
  • scott.tb25
    Radflek Radiator reflectors are great. I have used them in my new house and behind all of my radiators. I think I bought a pack large enough for 10 radiators. Found these on ebay but you can also buy online at many eco stores. Hope this helps someone. Thanks
    • phead
    • By phead 20th Dec 11, 3:14 PM
    • 208 Posts
    • 113 Thanks
    phead
    Radflex are great, I wear 4 on my head, tin foil hats are so last year!
    • CHRISSYG
    • By CHRISSYG 20th Dec 11, 6:38 PM
    • 5,385 Posts
    • 14,876 Thanks
    CHRISSYG
    Radflek Radiator reflectors are great. I have used them in my new house and behind all of my radiators. I think I bought a pack large enough for 10 radiators. Found these on ebay but you can also buy online at many eco stores. Hope this helps someone. Thanks
    Originally posted by scott.tb25
    Ive bought the same and once i have time to fit it i hope it will be a MSE as the info suggests
    • phill99
    • By phill99 20th Dec 11, 6:42 PM
    • 7,555 Posts
    • 6,781 Thanks
    phill99
    Radflek Radiator reflectors are great. I have used them in my new house and behind all of my radiators. I think I bought a pack large enough for 10 radiators. Found these on ebay but you can also buy online at many eco stores. Hope this helps someone. Thanks
    Originally posted by scott.tb25
    Not really as this is a 6 year old post.
    Eat vegetables and fear no creditors, rather than eat duck and hide.
    • plumb1
    • By plumb1 20th Dec 11, 7:28 PM
    • 2,979 Posts
    • 899 Thanks
    plumb1
    Does anyone know of a reasonably cheap place to buy good quality radiator reflector panels (the PVC ones coated in aluminium).

    I haven't seen them in my local B&Q or Homebase.
    Originally posted by mbspuk
    Why do you want to fit them behind the radiator??????????????
    When all the walls in your house are absorbing the heat.
    A thankyou is payment enough .
    • travellerboy
    • By travellerboy 20th Dec 11, 10:26 PM
    • 713 Posts
    • 351 Thanks
    travellerboy
    Absolute waste of time, agree with plumb1.
    All surface will allow the transfer of heat (this called be U value). The transfer is obviously hot to cold. In winter the walls, floor and ceiling allow the transfer of energy to outside, in summer the reverse occur still hot to cold.
    To minimise the transfer of heat you need to increase the U value, this is achieved by insulating the surfaces.

    Reflecting the energy will have no significant saving
  • TempName
    Not a waste of time
    I disagree.
    There are three ways of transfering heat. Conduction, convection and radiation.
    Foil will not help stop the transfer of heat by conduction or convection (though any insulating backing of these products might reduce heat loss by conduction). However it will reflect radiated heat that would otherwise be absorbed by the wall.
    It is correct that all the walls absorb heat, but most of this transfer is by conduction, only objects (walls) very close to the radiator will absorb significant amounts of heat by radiation (the intensity of the radiation is proportional to the cube of the distance from the heat source to the absorbing body).
    So I believe is is correct that you can achieve an efficiency improvement or gain more warmth (as the reflected radiation can then hopefully be absorbed by the air) by reflecting some of the radiated heat of the radiator.
    Whether it is actualy financially effective to do this is another matter.
  • janaltus
    the intensity of the radiation is proportional to the cube of the distance from the heat source to the absorbing body
    Originally posted by TempName
    Don't you think MSErs need to know that the intensity of radiation is inversely proportional to the square of the distance from the point source?

    The answer, surely, is to stop using these wall-hugging modern radiators and return to the Victorian-style floor standing ones that often stood about a foot or more away from the wall. Or, I'm told, slap a couple of polystyrene tiles on the wall, behind the radiator.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim's to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

4,884Posts Today

5,907Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • Deeply offensive comment from audience member on question time. Trivialising mental health conditions to make a political point. #bbcqt

  • Today's twitter poll: What proportion of your usual monthly spending do you do in cash (ie not plastic, bank transfer, cheque etc)

  • RT @GemmaRobyn: @MartinSLewis my parents earned +£50k but it didn't mean they could afford to help. I worked 2 jobs at uni to get by. Why b?

  • Follow Martin