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  • FIRST POST
    The_Lorax
    how to get a mortgage after bankruptcy
    • #1
    • 11th Dec 10, 7:38 AM
    how to get a mortgage after bankruptcy 11th Dec 10 at 7:38 AM
    You too can get a mortgage after bankruptcy.
    I have just bought a house for £250k after being declared bankrupt in April 2005. Conventional wisdom that Bankruptcy ends your chances of ever getting a mortgage is just not true but there are some golden rules to follow.
    If you want to know how I did it, read on.
    Golden Rule One Ė Sort your life out.
    Iím not here to judge, I went bankrupt through a combination of bad luck, greed, laziness and burying my head in the sand. The important thing is learn from your mistake.
    Since then my wife and I have been pretty much perfect customers, pay all your bills on time, live within your means. When you can get a credit card use it but pay it off every month. I used mine just for petrol and paid in full as soon as the bill came in. when the time is right apply for catalogues and do the same. You need to rebuild your credit footprint by getting the low end low value lending and making the most of it.
    We owned a house and my wife had to get a loan from the bank to buy out my half of the interest in it. We scrimped and paid that off in half of its planned term. It was not easy but it hugely increased her customer score at her bank.
    Likewise I left lots of money in my account as long as I could to look like a stable character.
    Do your life laundry; cut your outgoings, find bargains, it all helps. Check your credit file with a fine tooth comb. Make sure that each lender shows your account as settled or partially settled and with the settlement date as the date of your bankruptcy discharge. I had several that had either not put it as settled or had it showing as settled years after discharge. This has the effect of making you look as though your money troubles have continued since bankruptcy and will make any financial institution give you a very wide berth. It can be difficult to get it corrected but persist using all the advice on the rest of this site as it is essential.
    Final tip here if you owed a lot of money when you went bankrupt you probably had PPI. I had a loan from my bank pre BR which they said I had to take out PPI for or they wouldnít let me have it. When I complained to the Financial Ombudsman I got £3,000 back which enabled me to replace my car when it died without having to borrow money.
    So rule one, sort your life out. If you havenít done this, donít even bother with the rest.
    Golden Rule Two: Persist
    I went to a broker on a personal recommendation; someone who purported to be experienced in my kind of case. He told me I had no chance and would have to wait at least another year and even then wouldnít be able to afford a house at more than £200k. (His name was Jon Shaw from Positive Solutions Ė donít even bother)
    A good friend of mine told me not to give up but to phone around mortgage companies myself. I phoned as many as I could find. In the end I phoned 84 different mortgage providers and 18 said that they would consider me. I have listed them at the bottom but you have to do it for yourself. They judge it on individual circumstances and they change their policies all the time.
    Golden Rule Three: Do your research
    At this stage donít give your real name (you donít want to leave footprints and some of them will want to do a soft search on you.) but be completely honest about everything else. First explain how long you have been discharged and your position and ask whether they will consider you. If they say yes then you need to know what their lending policy is. Some still do multiples of income, most say they base in on affordability the reality is that they are all different. Some will give you a formula, some will ask you for your details and then say how much you can borrow without telling you how it is worked out, some wonít go that far without running a credit check.
    The next stage is to ask how they assess customers. Some do a hard computerised credit score. This is likely to be a problem for you. Firstly you have an adverse history so it will probably knock you out, second it will record a visible search on your file. If you apply for a mortgage and another lender searched you two weeks ago then the second lender can be pretty sure the first one said no and mark you down for it.
    Other lenders use a combination of scoring and other techniques. If you have an account with a lender already they will take into account your customer score which is internal to that institution.
    For me, the best bet was to go with a building society that didnít score at all. Instead they got full credit files for myself and my wife and went through them with a fine tooth comb. They also went through bank statements, payslips, everything. They raised lots of queries, wanted to know what certain payments were for. The bottom line is that a human being came to a judgement about whether I had sorted my life out and decided I had.
    Everyone is different though and so what worked for me might be different for you. Try to get the people from the lenders talking, explain what you are doing. Some will be friendly, some downright snooty and rude. The friendly ones, however, can give you some really useful information.
    Donít go with the first one you find. Go through all the lenders you can find and then make us a short list. Prioritise them. If necessary ring round again and get further details.
    Ultimately you will get down to a handful that look really promising. Then decide who you are going with. It can still break down even at this point. I didnít get a mortgage with the provider at the top of my list and you might not either.
    Golden Rule Four: Donít ever give up!!
    You are then faced with an agonising time of sending information back and forth but hopefully it will be worth it.
    I moved in October 2010. I earn about £45k a year. I bought a house for just under £250k on an 80% mortgage; the other 20% came from equity in the house I already owned. i'm now paying £1021 a month for my mortgage.
    Getting a mortgage is not easy after a bankruptcy but if you get yourself sorted it is possible so donít give up.
    The lists of those I rang and those who said yes are below BUT EVERYONES DIFFERENT SO YOU HAVE TO DO YOUR OWN RESEARCH

    If you want to know any more, just ask.

    Good Luck!!
    The people I rang were:
    Royal Bank of Scotland
    Cheltenham and Gloucester
    Halifax
    Manchester Building Society
    Yorkshire Building Society
    Abbey
    One Account
    ING Direct
    HSBC
    First Direct
    nationwide Buiding Society
    newcastle Building Society
    Scottish Widows Bank
    Barnsley BS
    Cambridge BS
    Chorley & District BS
    Coventry BS
    Natwest
    Britannia
    GMAC
    Mortgage Express
    accord
    aldermore
    alliance and Leicester Direct
    Bank of Ireland (NI)
    Bank of Scotland (Mortgages)
    Beverley
    BM Solutions
    Buckinghamshire Building Society
    Chelsea BS
    Cheshire BS
    Clydesdale Bank
    Cumberland
    Darlington BS
    Derbyshire BS
    Direct Line
    Dudley BS
    Dunfermline BS
    First Active
    Furness BS
    Hanley Economic BS
    Intelligent Finance
    Ipswich BS
    ITL Mortgages
    Kensington
    Kent Reliance BS
    Leeds BS
    Leek United
    Legal & General Mortgage Club
    Lloyds TSB
    Loughborough
    Mansfield
    market Harborough BS
    Marsden
    Melton Mowbray
    Monmouthshire BS
    National Counties BS
    Natwest
    Newbury BS
    Northern Rock
    Norwich & Peterborough BS
    Nottingham BS
    Pink Home Loans
    Platform
    PMS
    Post Office Ltd
    Principality BS
    Progressive BS
    Saffron BS
    Scottish BS
    Shepshed BS
    Skipton BS
    Stroud Swindon BS
    Teachers BS
    Co-operative Bank
    Mortgage Works
    Tipton & Coseley
    Vernon
    West Bromwich Building Society
    Woolwich (Barclays)
    Yorkshire Bank
    Bath investment and BS
    Chesham BS

    The ones that said yes were:
    Norwich & Peterbororgh
    Saffron BS
    /skipton BS
    Tipton & Coseley
    Cheltenham and Gloucester
    Halifax
    Manchester BS
    Yorkshire BS
    Barnsley BS
    Cambridge BS
    Coventry BS
    Clydesdale Bank
    Dudley BS
    Furness BS
    Kent Reliance
    Leeds BS
    Leek United
    Mansfield

     
     
Page 1
  • Stew125
    • #2
    • 11th Dec 10, 9:48 AM
    Credit search spiral
    • #2
    • 11th Dec 10, 9:48 AM
    Thank you very much for your moral boosting advice
    My situation has some similarities. I have found much the same thing and have trawled through the internet and documentation too. I have never been bankrupt but have now been declined a mortgage several times causing bemusement and anguish.
    I will look at a few I have missed from your list at the bottom. But this is exactly the information and guidance I joined this site for.
    Thanks

    Stew125
  • alastairq
    • #3
    • 11th Dec 10, 10:21 AM
    • #3
    • 11th Dec 10, 10:21 AM
    hi...and thank you for your informative contribution.

    Whilst I have achieved an age where a mortgage is really out of the question...I would like to suggest to the mods that this thread is awarded stickie status???
    No, I don't think all other drivers are idiots......but some are determined to change my mind.......
  • now
    • #4
    • 11th Dec 10, 10:39 AM
    • #4
    • 11th Dec 10, 10:39 AM
    hi...and thank you for your informative contribution.

    Whilst I have achieved an age where a mortgage is really out of the question...I would like to suggest to the mods that this thread is awarded stickie status???
    Originally posted by alastairq

    Good idea, I think this idea is brill
    Thank you for taking the time to post this, it must have taken you a long time (it would have taken me a week) It might help gain brownie points with the 18 who will consider ex BR's as they will get more business via the board
    If you woke up this morning congratulations, you have another chance
  • kepar
    • #5
    • 11th Dec 10, 10:48 AM
    • #5
    • 11th Dec 10, 10:48 AM
    How did you manage to keep the £3000, surely the OR was interested in this as it was a pre br loan?
  • dojoman
    • #6
    • 11th Dec 10, 11:52 AM
    • #6
    • 11th Dec 10, 11:52 AM
    How did you manage to keep the £3000, surely the OR was interested in this as it was a pre br loan?
    Originally posted by kepar
    Totally agree, how did you manage to keep the PPI surely this should have gone to the OR? Thanks for the list by the way, could be very helpful in the future
    B&SC No. 298
    Life`s Tragedy is that we get OLD too soon
    and WISE too late!
  • The_Lorax
    • #7
    • 11th Dec 10, 9:25 PM
    PPI Money after bankruptcy
    • #7
    • 11th Dec 10, 9:25 PM
    Thanks for the warm reception, I owe my currrent position to excellent advice from a good very friend and I just wanted to return the favour.

    In my experience (and I have had several pay-outs) you can keep money from a PPI complaint provided you have been discharged by the OR.
    I have had a company refuse to pay out as I had been declared bankrupt but when I took it to the Financial Ombudsman they wrote to the OR who (eventually) confirmed I could keep the money.
    It does mean (and I don't know if I' m allowed to say this) wait until you are discharged before you complain about PPI or you will lose it.

    Good luck and if anybody has any other questions I will try to answer them.
  • WLITC
    • #8
    • 11th Dec 10, 9:53 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Dec 10, 9:53 PM
    Lorax a very big thanks for the post. This is something I have been thinking about over the past few months. I suspect I'm not likely to be in a postion to buy for at least two or three years, but its good to know that its possible!
  • kepar
    • #9
    • 11th Dec 10, 9:56 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Dec 10, 9:56 PM
    So basically you have built your new "life", by taking out large loans with PPI. Using the money to buy what you wanted, then after paying for a period of time going br. Then after a year claim back large amounts of PPI.
    It seems somewhere the OR has missedtis, but surely it is a credit before the br and should be given to the creditors.
  • Alan M
    It seems somewhere the OR has missedtis, but surely it is a credit before the br and should be given to the creditors.
    Originally posted by kepar
    The technical term you are looking for is "asset after the event".

    There is a 36 month period post BR (not discharge) in which the OR can investigate any assets which you have aquired. It is up to you to prove that none of these assets existed pre BR.

    Once beyond that 36 month period you're free and clear.

    If the OP was was BR in 2005 then anything beyond 2008 is free and clear.

    If the OP claimed back the PPi after this three year period, it doesn't fall into the category of assets after the event.

  • alastairq
    plus the PPi claim arose out of mis-selling on the part of the loan providers....

    or is the moral issue only to be aimed at us, and not them?
    No, I don't think all other drivers are idiots......but some are determined to change my mind.......
  • haremscarem
    PPI's are something you paid for and something you didn't need or probably want and was deviously sold to you. Why would you want to voluntarily give it up to them?

    It's all down the to OR at the end of the day. If he/she says you can keep it then you can keep it, simple as. I kept monies during mine and they were never even mentioned again by the OR, he simply wasn't interested.

    Thanks for the info, it's a great read for post bankruptcy. Everything is possible, including credit, so never give up.
  • dojoman
    I thought that you had to declare everything to the OR or am I missing something?
    B&SC No. 298
    Life`s Tragedy is that we get OLD too soon
    and WISE too late!
  • fiveyearplan
    Many thanks for the thread Lorax. I will want to re-mortgage as soon as interest rates start to go up so find it very useful. I have a wonderful mortgage advisor who, I have no doubt, be able to get me a re-mortgage if there is one to be had, however I am only (nearly!) 3 years post BR so hoping that interest rates stay low as long as possible as I know every year post BR is beneficial!

    Mortgage free by 2014


  • fiveyearplan
    Form your figures above it appears you got a mortgage for at least 4 x salary, did you include any other income, go self cert etc?

    Please PM me if you don't feel you can answer in an open forum.

    Mortgage free by 2014


  • haremscarem
    You're SUPPOSED to declare everything, but not everyone does. It seems quite easy to do avoid declaring things as well. Either they are too busy or too dense or simply couldn't care less. Who knows?
  • iquit
    Thanks Lorax.
    "Your journey has molded you for your greater good, and it was exactly what it needed to be. Don't think that you've lost time. There is no short-cutting to life. It took each and every situation you have encountered to bring you to the now. And now is right on time."

    2013 MFW No. 124 BSC No. 261
    AD 20/04/10
  • The_Lorax
    Form your figures above it appears you got a mortgage for at least 4 x salary, did you include any other income, go self cert etc?

    Please PM me if you don't feel you can answer in an open forum.
    Originally posted by fiveyearplan
    Hi
    I forgot to mention that I am also on Disability Living Allowance as I have major health problems (which contributed to my bankruptcy). it contributes about £3k to my income and I have a little part time job that earns me another couple of hundred per month.

    As such when I got a mortgage for 198,800 it was just under 4x my total annual income.

    Good Luck!
  • dennis76davies
    You too can get a mortgage after bankruptcy.
    I have just bought a house for £250k after being declared bankrupt in April 2005. Conventional wisdom that Bankruptcy ends your chances of ever getting a mortgage is just not true but there are some golden rules to follow.
    If you want to know how I did it, read on.
    Golden Rule One Ė Sort your life out.
    Iím not here to judge, I went bankrupt through a combination of bad luck, greed, laziness and burying my head in the sand. The important thing is learn from your mistake.
    Since then my wife and I have been pretty much perfect customers, pay all your bills on time, live within your means. When you can get a credit card use it but pay it off every month. I used mine just for petrol and paid in full as soon as the bill came in. when the time is right apply for catalogues and do the same. You need to rebuild your credit footprint by getting the low end low value lending and making the most of it.
    We owned a house and my wife had to get a loan from the bank to buy out my half of the interest in it. We scrimped and paid that off in half of its planned term. It was not easy but it hugely increased her customer score at her bank.
    Likewise I left lots of money in my account as long as I could to look like a stable character.
    Do your life laundry; cut your outgoings, find bargains, it all helps. Check your credit file with a fine tooth comb. Make sure that each lender shows your account as settled or partially settled and with the settlement date as the date of your bankruptcy discharge. I had several that had either not put it as settled or had it showing as settled years after discharge. This has the effect of making you look as though your money troubles have continued since bankruptcy and will make any financial institution give you a very wide berth. It can be difficult to get it corrected but persist using all the advice on the rest of this site as it is essential.
    Final tip here if you owed a lot of money when you went bankrupt you probably had PPI. I had a loan from my bank pre BR which they said I had to take out PPI for or they wouldnít let me have it. When I complained to the Financial Ombudsman I got £3,000 back which enabled me to replace my car when it died without having to borrow money.
    So rule one, sort your life out. If you havenít done this, donít even bother with the rest.
    Golden Rule Two: Persist
    I went to a broker on a personal recommendation; someone who purported to be experienced in my kind of case. He told me I had no chance and would have to wait at least another year and even then wouldnít be able to afford a house at more than £200k. (His name was Jon Shaw from Positive Solutions Ė donít even bother)
    A good friend of mine told me not to give up but to phone around mortgage companies myself. I phoned as many as I could find. In the end I phoned 84 different mortgage providers and 18 said that they would consider me. I have listed them at the bottom but you have to do it for yourself. They judge it on individual circumstances and they change their policies all the time.
    Golden Rule Three: Do your research
    At this stage donít give your real name (you donít want to leave footprints and some of them will want to do a soft search on you.) but be completely honest about everything else. First explain how long you have been discharged and your position and ask whether they will consider you. If they say yes then you need to know what their lending policy is. Some still do multiples of income, most say they base in on affordability the reality is that they are all different. Some will give you a formula, some will ask you for your details and then say how much you can borrow without telling you how it is worked out, some wonít go that far without running a credit check.
    The next stage is to ask how they assess customers. Some do a hard computerised credit score. This is likely to be a problem for you. Firstly you have an adverse history so it will probably knock you out, second it will record a visible search on your file. If you apply for a mortgage and another lender searched you two weeks ago then the second lender can be pretty sure the first one said no and mark you down for it.
    Other lenders use a combination of scoring and other techniques. If you have an account with a lender already they will take into account your customer score which is internal to that institution.
    For me, the best bet was to go with a building society that didnít score at all. Instead they got full credit files for myself and my wife and went through them with a fine tooth comb. They also went through bank statements, payslips, everything. They raised lots of queries, wanted to know what certain payments were for. The bottom line is that a human being came to a judgement about whether I had sorted my life out and decided I had.
    Everyone is different though and so what worked for me might be different for you. Try to get the people from the lenders talking, explain what you are doing. Some will be friendly, some downright snooty and rude. The friendly ones, however, can give you some really useful information.
    Donít go with the first one you find. Go through all the lenders you can find and then make us a short list. Prioritise them. If necessary ring round again and get further details.
    Ultimately you will get down to a handful that look really promising. Then decide who you are going with. It can still break down even at this point. I didnít get a mortgage with the provider at the top of my list and you might not either.
    Golden Rule Four: Donít ever give up!!
    You are then faced with an agonising time of sending information back and forth but hopefully it will be worth it.
    I moved in October 2010. I earn about £45k a year. I bought a house for just under £250k on an 80% mortgage; the other 20% came from equity in the house I already owned. i'm now paying £1021 a month for my mortgage.
    Getting a mortgage is not easy after a bankruptcy but if you get yourself sorted it is possible so donít give up.
    The lists of those I rang and those who said yes are below BUT EVERYONES DIFFERENT SO YOU HAVE TO DO YOUR OWN RESEARCH

    If you want to know any more, just ask.

    Good Luck!!
    The people I rang were:
    Royal Bank of Scotland
    Cheltenham and Gloucester
    Halifax
    Manchester Building Society
    Yorkshire Building Society
    Abbey
    One Account
    ING Direct
    HSBC
    First Direct
    nationwide Buiding Society
    newcastle Building Society
    Scottish Widows Bank
    Barnsley BS
    Cambridge BS
    Chorley & District BS
    Coventry BS
    Natwest
    Britannia
    GMAC
    Mortgage Express
    accord
    aldermore
    alliance and Leicester Direct
    Bank of Ireland (NI)
    Bank of Scotland (Mortgages)
    Beverley
    BM Solutions
    Buckinghamshire Building Society
    Chelsea BS
    Cheshire BS
    Clydesdale Bank
    Cumberland
    Darlington BS
    Derbyshire BS
    Direct Line
    Dudley BS
    Dunfermline BS
    First Active
    Furness BS
    Hanley Economic BS
    Intelligent Finance
    Ipswich BS
    ITL Mortgages
    Kensington
    Kent Reliance BS
    Leeds BS
    Leek United
    Legal & General Mortgage Club
    Lloyds TSB
    Loughborough
    Mansfield
    market Harborough BS
    Marsden
    Melton Mowbray
    Monmouthshire BS
    National Counties BS
    Natwest
    Newbury BS
    Northern Rock
    Norwich & Peterborough BS
    Nottingham BS
    Pink Home Loans
    Platform
    PMS
    Post Office Ltd
    Principality BS
    Progressive BS
    Saffron BS
    Scottish BS
    Shepshed BS
    Skipton BS
    Stroud Swindon BS
    Teachers BS
    Co-operative Bank
    Mortgage Works
    Tipton & Coseley
    Vernon
    West Bromwich Building Society
    Woolwich (Barclays)
    Yorkshire Bank
    Bath investment and BS
    Chesham BS

    The ones that said yes were:
    Norwich & Peterbororgh
    Saffron BS
    /skipton BS
    Tipton & Coseley
    Cheltenham and Gloucester
    Halifax
    Manchester BS
    Yorkshire BS
    Barnsley BS
    Cambridge BS
    Coventry BS
    Clydesdale Bank
    Dudley BS
    Furness BS
    Kent Reliance
    Leeds BS
    Leek United
    Mansfield

     
     
    Originally posted by The_Lorax
    Lorax great post thank you, Which lender approved you in the end?
  • Tinka21
    Glad it all worked out for you! I'm also pleased to see Mansfield on your list as I used to work for them lol
    Total Debt £36323 Dec 2012 £21000 March 2015
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