Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • MSE Archna
    • By MSE Archna 6th Oct 06, 7:00 PM
    • 1,872Posts
    • 5,996Thanks
    MSE Archna
    Council Tax Cost Cutting: reduce your band and grab any discounts Discussion Area
    • #1
    • 6th Oct 06, 7:00 PM
    Council Tax Cost Cutting: reduce your band and grab any discounts Discussion Area 6th Oct 06 at 7:00 PM
    This thread is here to discuss the content of the article on Council Tax Cashback: reduce your band and save £1000s.

    However if you have already followed the system, please use report them in the Council tax rebanding successes discussion.

    Note from Martin: Thank you to all the contributers to the initial thread, which provided the genisis for the article. Much appreciated.


    Last edited by MSE Archna; 10-06-2010 at 4:39 PM.
    Report inappropriate posts: forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com




Page 248
    • Rickp
    • By Rickp 2nd Apr 17, 3:38 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Rickp
    I'm actually renting. I've been here since August. The flats started being occupied in 1996/97. That's all the info I can give at the moment. As I said there's a property below me that has been up for sale since before Xmas 2016 for £58,995. The semi detached property had off road parking, plus garage central heating & double glazing. This flat has none of the above & doesn't even have permanent heating in the lounge area. I had to buy a heater as the winter set in. It's basically no frills bog standard dwelling. Both this property & the semi I describe are in band B.
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 2nd Apr 17, 7:15 PM
    • 9,932 Posts
    • 7,999 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    In many places property prices hit a high in 1988/89 and then fell annually until 1995. By 1999 most had risen to around 1991 levels. My guess is that the 1996/7 sale price for these flats was high, but they haven't kept pace with other property.

    If you were in time to make a valid appeal, you have a right to go to a Valuation Tribunal. If you are outside the 6 month time limit and you can't persuade them, there is very little you can do other than try and find a similar property in Band A.
    • Rickp
    • By Rickp 3rd Apr 17, 8:29 AM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Rickp
    Thanks for that. Like I said I found 2 similar properties & they said one was too small & the other was reduced due to circumstances. I'd love to know what the circumstances are/were, as the flat looks just like mine, it's made of bricks & mortar. In a way it's my own fault I read the 6 month resident limit. I thought it said you had to live in a property for 6 months before you could appeal.
    • Starling2015
    • By Starling2015 5th Apr 17, 9:03 AM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Starling2015
    First time here, not entirely sure I'm posting in correct place!

    I received the money saving email regarding council tax rebanding and am after some guidance if I should proceed.

    We bought our ground floor 2 bed flat in august 2006. There is one flat of same size and layout above us. Adjoined to us are two flats that was originally a house ( our flats were joined on by extension I believe in 1976) The flats next door are 3 bedrooms and the total floor area of those 2 flats are double in size compared to us. My flat and the two adjoining are band B however the flat above me is a band A.

    Houses opposite us albeit they have a different postcode have a B band when they are 3 bedroom semi detached.

    I have looked at the sale history of our flat and done the nationwide 1991 calculator which confirms Band A ( £34000), was sold in 1996 for 28000.

    My concern is if I get rejected that the flat above me will move to a band b and she is a retired lady on her own , would hate that to happen.

    Oh and there are a group of flats very similar to ours just round the corner all are band A ( ours maybe worth a bit more than them due to that area they are situated)

    Is it pursuing?

    Thanks do your time
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 5th Apr 17, 3:18 PM
    • 9,932 Posts
    • 7,999 Thanks
    lincroft1710

    We bought our ground floor 2 bed flat in august 2006. There is one flat of same size and layout above us. Adjoined to us are two flats that was originally a house ( our flats were joined on by extension I believe in 1976) The flats next door are 3 bedrooms and the total floor area of those 2 flats are double in size compared to us. My flat and the two adjoining are band B however the flat above me is a band A.

    I have looked at the sale history of our flat and done the nationwide 1991 calculator which confirms Band A ( £34000), was sold in 1996 for 28000.

    My concern is if I get rejected that the flat above me will move to a band b and she is a retired lady on her own , would hate that to happen.

    Is it pursuing?

    Thanks do your time
    Originally posted by Starling2015
    Check the history of the band of the neighbour above, there is a possibility that the band was reduced. If it has always been Band A, then it is up to you if you want to ask for a band review and if your band is found to be correct, as you say, your neighbour's band may be increased.
    • Samc87
    • By Samc87 5th Apr 17, 8:22 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Samc87
    Impact of extensions on banding
    We purchased our house in Oct 2015 for 295k. It was a band D along with the rest of the street. In April 16 our council advised they were with immediate effect increasing our band to an E. It was clear that they had done this as a result or reviewing the purchase price from 2015

    The previous owners built an single storey extension about 7 yrs ago which increased the size of the kitchen and created a second living room (no change to number of bathrooms, bedrooms etc.). Similar properties have sold on the street recently (with no extension) for 255-265k (likely we paid over the odds for this as the extension isnt exactly palatial).

    Is this response from the council commonplace and are we in a position to query our changed band?

    Thank you in advance
    • CIS
    • By CIS 5th Apr 17, 8:46 PM
    • 10,073 Posts
    • 5,754 Thanks
    CIS
    The re-banding is done by the Valuation Office Agency (E & W) or Scottish Assessors - the council don't get involved and can only act once the banding has been altered. There would have been an improvement marker placed on the property when the extension was built, this caused the re-banding to take place on sale - it can take a while after the sale before they catch up and review the banding.

    To query the banding you need to contact the Valuation Office Agency / Scottish Assessors directly but you'd appear to be out of time for a formal appeal . You can ask then to look at the banding to check if it's correct but the options are more limited.

    Craig

    Craig
    I no longer work in Council Tax Recovery as I'm now a self employed Council Tax advisor and consultant with my own Council Tax consultancy business. My views are my own reading of the law and you should always check with the local authority in question.
    • John Payne
    • By John Payne 7th Apr 17, 3:45 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    John Payne
    Severe mental incapacity
    Does anyone know where Mr Lewis sourced his information on what constitutes severe mental incapacity, as YouGov gives no exemplification. The problem is, that some GPs are reluctant to commit themselves to signing the exemption form for Parkinsons Disease sufferers. Martin Lewis, however, cites PD in his blog and was very adamant about it on TV recently - but on what basis? Some sufferers will, I fear, be exempted, some not - which is manifestly unfair.
    • CIS
    • By CIS 7th Apr 17, 5:12 PM
    • 10,073 Posts
    • 5,754 Thanks
    CIS
    Does anyone know where Mr Lewis sourced his information on what constitutes severe mental incapacity, as YouGov gives no exemplification. The problem is, that some GPs are reluctant to commit themselves to signing the exemption form for Parkinsons Disease sufferers. Martin Lewis, however, cites PD in his blog and was very adamant about it on TV recently - but on what basis? Some sufferers will, I fear, be exempted, some not - which is manifestly unfair.
    Originally posted by John Payne
    This query has come up before - there is no specified illnesses in legislation. The qualifying criteria are shown in the Local Government Finance Act 1992 and the Council Tax (discount disregard) order 1992 (as amended) - summarised here. If they meet the criteria then they can be disregarded - any refusal generally comes down to the Dr not signing the forms (I've seen it happen many times over the years)

    Craig
    I no longer work in Council Tax Recovery as I'm now a self employed Council Tax advisor and consultant with my own Council Tax consultancy business. My views are my own reading of the law and you should always check with the local authority in question.
    • praby
    • By praby 16th Apr 17, 9:28 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    praby
    Invalid Appeal - I'm Confused
    I followed the guidance on MSE and lodged an appeal online using the GOV.UK service. I received a letter headed invalid appeal. The letter said that the proposal had not been validly made because I had not served the proposal correctly on the listing officer.

    The letter provides details of appeal to the valuation tribunal against the invalidity.

    Does anyone know what I did wrong, what I need to do to put it right, and whether I can continue with the process of getting a revaluation after apparently I messed up? All I did was fill in the form online!

    Thanks
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 17th Apr 17, 2:04 PM
    • 9,932 Posts
    • 7,999 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    I followed the guidance on MSE and lodged an appeal online using the GOV.UK service. I received a letter headed invalid appeal. The letter said that the proposal had not been validly made because I had not served the proposal correctly on the listing officer.

    The letter provides details of appeal to the valuation tribunal against the invalidity.

    Does anyone know what I did wrong, what I need to do to put it right, and whether I can continue with the process of getting a revaluation after apparently I messed up? All I did was fill in the form online!

    Thanks
    Originally posted by praby
    The most common reasons for proposal not being validly made is that it is out of time. The next is that you omitted to fill in a required "field"or filled in a field erroneously. The third would be that you do not appear to be the council taxpayer and thus have no right of appeal. If your proposal is out of time, there is no point in appealing to the VT. If you omitted or incorrectly filled in a required field, then I would suggest you submit a further proposal and forget this one.
    Last edited by lincroft1710; 17-04-2017 at 2:08 PM.
    • sazzlebgood?
    • By sazzlebgood? 19th Apr 17, 9:49 AM
    • 55 Posts
    • 128 Thanks
    sazzlebgood?
    Hi trying to find out if we can get a council tax rebate and reduction. A friend ( who has a disabled adult son) told us we should be able to get one but I'm not convinced Our situation is that our daughter is 12 get high rate DLA care and mobility due to her multiple disabilities and had to have handle rails installed all around the house to help her get around. I get carers allowance. So was wondering if anybody could offer me some advice as the info on MSE seems to only talk about been able to get a rebate if its in relation to an adult. Thanks
    • macman
    • By macman 19th Apr 17, 10:03 AM
    • 41,351 Posts
    • 17,001 Thanks
    macman
    Children under 18 are disregarded anyway for CT, and you can't be disregarded yourself as a carer if the person you care for is your own child, partner or spouse.
    If your 12 year old daughter and you are the only people living there then you should already be getting the 25% single person discount. But since you refer to 'our daughter' then I guess this is not the case?
    Your friend's son is an adult, so that's an entirely different situation, as will yours be when your daughter reaches 18.
    No free lunch, and no free laptop
    • talisay
    • By talisay 20th Apr 17, 10:10 AM
    • 778 Posts
    • 289 Thanks
    talisay
    Refund
    I have received notification that my property has been rebanded from E to D. Thanks to all on here who helped.

    I have not received a letter from the Council about a refund, just a few statements on the internet which look as though I have been awarded a four figure amount, although it doesn't mention the exact amount, and this has been deducted from the the balance I am due to pay over the next year.

    My question is do I have to accept this method of refund ? I would much rather any refund in cash and pay off my credit card which has a high interest rate and then make payments when they fall due saving myself the interest. As it seems to me the way the council are doing it gives them the interest and not me.

    Where do I stand on this? Can I insist on them paying the amount due to me? As I understand it and correct me if I'm wrong but do I have the right to pay my Council Tax monthly?

    Thanks again fo the help
    Last edited by talisay; 20-04-2017 at 2:23 PM.
    • talisay
    • By talisay 20th Apr 17, 2:30 PM
    • 778 Posts
    • 289 Thanks
    talisay
    Previous message
    I have re-read my previous message and apokogise that it's not very clear.

    What I was trying to ask was:
    It looks like I am due to receive about £1300 refund due to rebanding, but the local authority are planing to take it off my liability for 1917/18. Do I have to accept this as it would be far better if the paid me the refund and pay the council tax monthly as I have been doing in the past. Hope this is clearer. Many thanks
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 20th Apr 17, 3:09 PM
    • 9,932 Posts
    • 7,999 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    You can ask for the overpayment to be paid back to you directly rather than be credited against your 2017/18 CT bill. Just contact your council.

    For information only - CT payment for the whole financial year (1 Apr - 31 Mar) is actually due on 1 April of that year, but taxpayers may pay over 10 or 12 months. Failure to keep up with payments can result in the monthly payment option being lawfully withdrawn and the outstanding balance becoming immediately due.
    • muppy99
    • By muppy99 25th Apr 17, 9:44 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    muppy99
    Annexe or not annexe?
    Recently converted a small barn in our garden and have installed elderly mother and father in law. Thought we would be exempt due to their age. Council tax dept will not consider it as an annexe because "it is not attached to the main house". Help?
    • Keep pedalling
    • By Keep pedalling 25th Apr 17, 11:11 PM
    • 3,951 Posts
    • 4,309 Thanks
    Keep pedalling
    It is clearly a seperate property so will be subject to a seperate CT bill. Age does not come into it, but if they are on a low income with few savings they may be eligible for a reduction.
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 26th Apr 17, 1:47 PM
    • 9,932 Posts
    • 7,999 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    Age does not come into it.
    Originally posted by Keep pedalling
    Age very much does come into it where an "annex" is concerned

    http://www.northampton.gov.uk/info/200028/council-tax/924/council-tax-exemptions/22.

    Muppy 99 - The only reason a dwelling in a separate building within the curtilage of the main house would not be classed as an "annex", would be if it was not subject to a planning restriction which prevents the annex being sold separately to the main dwelling.
    • CIS
    • By CIS 26th Apr 17, 2:08 PM
    • 10,073 Posts
    • 5,754 Thanks
    CIS
    As Lincroft has pointed out an annexe which is occupied by dependent relatives may be exempt under Class W.

    If it's not regarded as an annexe then the 'standard' council tax rules apply and it would be billed as normal. If they're on a low income the they'd need to claim Council Tax Reduction.

    Craig
    I no longer work in Council Tax Recovery as I'm now a self employed Council Tax advisor and consultant with my own Council Tax consultancy business. My views are my own reading of the law and you should always check with the local authority in question.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

189Posts Today

2,087Users online

Martin's Twitter