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  • FIRST POST
    kilop999
    Condensor Washer/Dryer and a metred water supply...
    • #1
    • 1st Aug 10, 7:05 AM
    Condensor Washer/Dryer and a metred water supply... 1st Aug 10 at 7:05 AM
    I have a Bush WD-1000TXVE Washer dryer, my question is to do with how much water the thing uses nowhere can i find any sort of technical info about how much water the machine uses. The washing side of it im not to fussed about the part that im wondering about is the dryer as I have heard that the dam things can use a lot of water.

    atm my monthly water bill is £28 considering that i also live on my own and that my rate isn't far off an unmetered water bill I don't really see what this fuss is about and or how people save. Then again I have a friend who also has one he uses it once per week and has a shower, myself I have a bath. Hes paying such a low water bill I can't fathom how he does it.

    Should I be worried about this washer dryer affecting my bill this following year?

    Both parts of the machine are used about 2-3 times per week. Most times drying time is 1 hour and every now and then 2 hours for bed sheets.
Page 1
  • Gothicfairy
    • #2
    • 1st Aug 10, 8:10 AM
    • #2
    • 1st Aug 10, 8:10 AM
    I am probably being really thick here but why does the dryer use water ? I have a seperate condensor dryer and that does not have a hook up for water ? Am I missing something ?

    Shower is cheaper then bathing as long as it is not a power shower and a meter can be a lot cheaper depending on your RV
    There is a race of men that don't fit in; A race that can't stand still;
    So they break the hearts of kith and kin, and roam the world at will.

    Robert Service
    • macman
    • By macman 1st Aug 10, 9:39 AM
    • 40,880 Posts
    • 16,688 Thanks
    macman
    • #3
    • 1st Aug 10, 9:39 AM
    • #3
    • 1st Aug 10, 9:39 AM
    A condenser dryer does not use water, it heats the clothes to remove water, then condenses the resulting water into a tank rather than venting it to outside as with a conventional venting tumble drier. It's your increased electricity bill that you should be concerned about.
    No free lunch, and no free laptop
    • Andy_WSM
    • By Andy_WSM 1st Aug 10, 10:05 AM
    • 2,050 Posts
    • 4,469 Thanks
    Andy_WSM
    • #4
    • 1st Aug 10, 10:05 AM
    • #4
    • 1st Aug 10, 10:05 AM
    He has a washer dryer, which DOES use water on the drying cycle!

    Although, it's a small amount...The dryer in a washer dryer employs a small jet of cold water to provide the means for condensing the hot humid air from the drum - i.e. the humid air produced by the drying cycle. This jet is near continuous during the drying cycle, but is a pin !!!!! of a jet, so not enough to worry about from a metering point of view.
    • Andy_WSM
    • By Andy_WSM 1st Aug 10, 10:09 AM
    • 2,050 Posts
    • 4,469 Thanks
    Andy_WSM
    • #5
    • 1st Aug 10, 10:09 AM
    • #5
    • 1st Aug 10, 10:09 AM
    How does the dryer in a washer dryer work?



    "Condensing dryers in combination machines use cool water condensers to remove the moisture from the air in the drum. The warm, moist air leaving the drum is circulated through a plastic chamber, where it contacts a mist of cool water. This causes the moisture in the air to condense into water droplets and fall to the bottom of the condensing chamber, where it is pumped to the same drain as the wash water. The warm, dry air continues through the closed system back to the drum to remove more water from your clothes. "
  • Gothicfairy
    • #6
    • 1st Aug 10, 10:54 AM
    • #6
    • 1st Aug 10, 10:54 AM
    I didn't know that Andy, see I was right ..I was missing something.

    Ta for clearing it up and it sounds like it would not make a massive difference to the water bill.
    There is a race of men that don't fit in; A race that can't stand still;
    So they break the hearts of kith and kin, and roam the world at will.

    Robert Service
  • kilop999
    • #7
    • 2nd Aug 10, 2:59 AM
    • #7
    • 2nd Aug 10, 2:59 AM
    The way I understood it is the combo of washer and dryer it uses cool water to keep the drum cool, but I have heard that they can be costly to run on a water meter. Odd thing you mention about the electricity bill, its actually gone down since getting it.

    So the drying part of the conbo condensor uses how much water?

    Thanks for the replies appreciated.
  • robchap
    • #8
    • 2nd Aug 10, 8:32 AM
    • #8
    • 2nd Aug 10, 8:32 AM
    thats for your mac


    Technical specifications:
    • Energy consumption wash, spin and dry: 5.1kWh/cycle.
    • Energy consumption wash and spin only: 1.14kWh/cycle.
    • Water extraction efficiency: 63%.
    • Water consumption wash, spin and dry: 160litres/cycle.
    • Water consumption wash and spin: 58.8litres/cycle.
    • Estimated annual energy consumption: 1020kWh/year.
    • Estimated annual water consumption: 32000litres/year.
  • laurel7172
    • #9
    • 2nd Aug 10, 9:41 AM
    • #9
    • 2nd Aug 10, 9:41 AM
    So that's about 100L of water to *dry* a load of washing??? Eek!
  • Gothicfairy
    It does sound odd to use water to dry things ..lol

    One cubic meter (which is how the water companies bill) is one thousand litres so depending on the price per cubic meter you could work it out pences wise per load but it does seem a lot compared to the wash and spin cycle.
    There is a race of men that don't fit in; A race that can't stand still;
    So they break the hearts of kith and kin, and roam the world at will.

    Robert Service
  • kilop999
    I have come across that before i obviously never read it properly though, The thing with the 100 litres is, the time for drying on the dry setting is 2.5 hours where as i use an hour each time so thats much less that 100 litres, so thanks for clearing that up. Brilliant!!

    Roughly it would be 80Lx52weeks = 4.16cubic Litres

    20L per half hour

    Definently nothing to be worried about!!!!
    Last edited by kilop999; 02-08-2010 at 2:16 PM.
  • Gothicfairy
    I have never heard of a cubic litre ?

    do you mean cubic meteres ?

    4160 litres would make 4 cubic metres ( rounded down as below 5) so that would be whatever price per cubic meter a year depending on your area
    Say roughly about £10 as that would seem to be about the average amount

    The full load stats as supplied above were for 160 litres per cycle which is for what ? 2.5 hours and you use if for an hour say it would be more then 20 litres per half hour it would be closer to 32 litres
    You use the dryer for 2 hours per week that would be 128 litres a week so closer to 7 (6656 rounded up as above 5)CM3 per year.

    Unless of course I have my numbers way out.
    There is a race of men that don't fit in; A race that can't stand still;
    So they break the hearts of kith and kin, and roam the world at will.

    Robert Service
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