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  • Colour Republic
    • #2
    • 29th Mar 10, 2:00 PM
    • #2
    • 29th Mar 10, 2:00 PM
    I'm not sure Brewers are that expensive for Dulux, granted buying in small sizes of 1L 2.5L is not cost effective when buying trade emulsion paints, most average size rooms take at least 5L.

    The trade paints are more durable than the retail although for the layman it many not be noticeable in terms of colour and quality. Where it really matters is the pigment, for a professional they would rather do 2 coats on the wall than a possible 3, so in labour terms it is always more cost effective to go for the trade paints. If you would rather save a few quid and take the possible risk of having to apply a third coat I would say buy the retail
  • gou82
    • #3
    • 29th Mar 10, 2:21 PM
    • #3
    • 29th Mar 10, 2:21 PM
    That's what I was quoted by Brewers on Saturday, though it may have been £11.50, I can't remember exactly. It's only for one wall so 1Ltr should be enough. Given that I'm going over another colour it may be worthwhile to use the trade if it'll do it in 2 coats.
  • danielfulshaw
    • #4
    • 29th Mar 10, 3:56 PM
    • #4
    • 29th Mar 10, 3:56 PM
    I always use Dulux and I can tell the difference not just in terms of pigment but coverage is usually much better, depth of colour and it is much more durable. For instance, you can buy kitchen bathroom paint from dulux in homebase but the trade version is diamond eggshell and it is just a better more durable product and works out cheaper buying it in trade packs. A lot of the pack sizes will differ between retail and trade.
  • artha
    • #5
    • 29th Mar 10, 6:21 PM
    • #5
    • 29th Mar 10, 6:21 PM
    Bit of a stupid question this but Brewers sell Dulux Trade paint, silk emulsion, for around £12.50/Litre, whereas the likes of Homebase’s Dulux silk emulsion is £8 for 2.5L. Presumably the trade version is better, but in what way? and would it make any difference to a layman like me in terms of ease of application, final result or value for money?
    Originally posted by gou82
    The whole trade vs retail area in paints can be a bit of a minefield and is often a marketing play on peoples perceptions. There's also an extra level of confusion introduced with products labelled professional and contract

    A good/bad paint is often a very subjective appraisal and its often a question of trying a few brands to see what suits your needs.

    Do not assume that because something is labelled "trade" that it is a high quality product. What a tradesman wants from a paint will vary and may be very different from the average DIYer. For instance some trade paints are intended to suit the tradesmans needs i.e. cheap, thinnable, fast application/drying and short term appearance enhancers.

    Some trade (in particular contract matt emulsion) are deliberately low quality(porous) but they are designed like that to do a specific job i.e. new plaster as an initial very opaque covering that allows the plaster to dry out. It covers easily and looks great until you brush against it and it burnishes or you splash it and the stain soaks in.
  • Colour Republic
    • #6
    • 29th Mar 10, 7:12 PM
    • #6
    • 29th Mar 10, 7:12 PM
    Sorry Artha, I was referring to Dulux Trade paints, not trade paints in general which as you say can be confusing.

    I always spec Dulux trade paints for my jobs as it is my personal preference. If I was forced to choose another paint because of cost I’d go for Johnstone or Laylands trade paints, which are much more in line for what you would pay for Dulux retail
    • leveller2911
    • By leveller2911 29th Mar 10, 7:45 PM
    • 6,796 Posts
    • 11,558 Thanks
    leveller2911
    • #7
    • 29th Mar 10, 7:45 PM
    • #7
    • 29th Mar 10, 7:45 PM
    Good question OP.I'm a joiner and use Dulux Weathershiled which has an 8yr guarantee from Brewers but if you buy the same Weathershield from homebase it only carries a 5yr guarantee.....Same tin, same writing same weathershield system......
    If we in parliament cannot gain from ruling,then there is very little point in us being here: (Lord Manchester 1650) :rolleyes: how true!
  • artha
    • #8
    • 29th Mar 10, 8:00 PM
    • #8
    • 29th Mar 10, 8:00 PM
    Good question OP.I'm a joiner and use Dulux Weathershiled which has an 8yr guarantee from Brewers but if you buy the same Weathershield from homebase it only carries a 5yr guarantee.....Same tin, same writing same weathershield system......
    Originally posted by leveller2911
    I'm not completely sure as I've never used them but I think there are two variants.One is trade the other is DIY but both are freely available retail but I think the 8 year one is more expensive. Weathershield is a system so the correct primer/undercoat/gloss combination is supposedly needed to get the durability
  • gou82
    • #9
    • 29th Mar 10, 8:07 PM
    • #9
    • 29th Mar 10, 8:07 PM
    I see what you mean artha... Dulux has two websites, one for 'normal' paint, another for 'trade products' which has an 'icipaints' url. Then there's a 'Trade Profesional' section to that site! Anyway, on the basis that expensiver=better and the recommendations previous posters Dulux Trade seems worth a punt to me.
  • artha
    Sorry Artha, I was referring to Dulux Trade paints, not trade paints in general which as you say can be confusing.

    I always spec Dulux trade paints for my jobs as it is my personal preference. If I was forced to choose another paint because of cost I’d go for Johnstone or Laylands trade paints, which are much more in line for what you would pay for Dulux retail
    Originally posted by Colour Republic
    I don't have too much practical experience with actually using trade paints but my background is in the paint manufacturing industry. I would think that the brand reputation of Dulux would mean that quality is generally good and maintained. However,with the takeovers in the paint industry over the last 20 years the brand names are all that remains of many DIY/trade products.

    For many years now I've used water based gloss and undercoats for woodwork because of their non-yellowing properties, lack of smell, easy clean up,qiuck drying and exterior durability but they are difficult to apply(short wet edge) if you are a slow painter. Even professionals don't like them as the gloss and flow aren't the same as traditional gloss. Hence you don't tend to see much in the way of trade versions
  • nickj
    the dulux trade paints are thicker and have more pigment then the dulux diy store http://www.dulux.co.uk/advice/questions/faq/faq_005.jsp the diy stuff can be used straight from the can .

    dulux should make the difference clearer as many diyers presume that it's all the same
  • artha
    the dulux trade paints are thicker and have more pigment then the dulux diy store http://www.dulux.co.uk/advice/questions/faq/faq_005.jsp the diy stuff can be used straight from the can .

    dulux should make the difference clearer as many diyers presume that it's all the same
    Originally posted by nickj
    Confirms what I said above. Sometimes this can be for valid reasons but other times a con. I can understand a paint being made in a concentrated form so that a tradesman can thin it to his ideal viscosity for application. Hence the paint should be more expensive per litre but when thinned to say retail paint(cheaper) viscosity will be the same price per litre for the same covering power.
  • gou82
    k, really parading my ignorance now... does nickj mean that dulux trade paint *needs* to be thinned, or can it be used straight from the tin? Then does the trade brochure colour reflect a thinned application or straight from the tin? (or are both the same?)

    And also since it has more pigment, I suppose it will come out darker than the retail equivalent of the same colour?
  • artha
    k, really parading my ignorance now... does nickj mean that dulux trade paint *needs* to be thinned, or can it be used straight from the tin? Then does the trade brochure colour reflect a thinned application or straight from the tin? (or are both the same?)

    And also since it has more pigment, I suppose it will come out darker than the retail equivalent of the same colour?
    Originally posted by gou82
    I would reckon that it could be used straight from the tin if you found it suited your application style. It would also depend on whether you were going to brush it or use a roller or a paint pad etc.

    The colour will always be the same regardless of whether it is thinned or not
  • gou82
    I would reckon that it could be used straight from the tin if you found it suited your application style. It would also depend on whether you were going to brush it or use a roller or a paint pad etc.
    Originally posted by artha

    As in due to the greater viscosity? I like to use a paint pad, so a thicker paint might not be the best in that respect.
  • artha
    As in due to the greater viscosity? I like to use a paint pad, so a thicker paint might not be the best in that respect.
    Originally posted by gou82
    If it's thicker than is suitable for a paint pad then you would have to thin it. The problem is that you need a second container to tip the paint + diluent (water or white spirit depending on the paint type) into as you'll end up with more paint than was in the original container. You could of course put some paint + diluent into the application tray and mix it there but things could get messy and you may not get the same mix each time
  • artha
    gou82

    Further to my posts above I need to qualify what I said having re-read your original post. For the most part I've been commenting on the differences between trade and retail in terms of composition and marketing Having re-looked at the price of the trade paint you are considering I would consider it a tad expensive compared to the retail product even if it is a better quality product. At nearly 4 times the per litre price the trade paint would have to cover in one coat and flow out perfectly for me to buy it!

    Are you sure you are comparing like with like in terms of colour and finish?
  • Dulux Trade
    The difference between Dulux Trade paints and Dulux Retail paints
    The key difference is the consistency of the paint. Dulux Retail paints are ready for use straight from the can. Many professional decorators, however, like to thin their paint before use and so Dulux Trade paints have a slightly different formulation. However, both Dulux Trade and Retail paints are manufactured to the same high specification.
    • roddydogs
    • By roddydogs 30th Mar 10, 9:34 AM
    • 5,619 Posts
    • 2,317 Thanks
    roddydogs
    So why is for instance, B & Q "Trade" paint cheaper?
  • artha
    The key difference is the consistency of the paint. Dulux Retail paints are ready for use straight from the can. Many professional decorators, however, like to thin their paint before use and so Dulux Trade paints have a slightly different formulation. However, both Dulux Trade and Retail paints are manufactured to the same high specification.
    Originally posted by Dulux Trade
    note that the above is a quote from the Dulux site first posted above at post 11
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