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chipped crockery, possible to repair?
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# 1
joyfull
Old 23-02-2010, 8:10 AM
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Default chipped crockery, possible to repair?

I don't like using chipped cups, bowls & plates but hate to throw them out. Is is possible to just file the chip down (if so, what with?) so it's not sharp & less visible?

Would be interested if anyone does this. Many thanks.
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# 2
Mags_cat
Old 23-02-2010, 8:18 AM
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I don't see why not - except that you'd be leaving an exposed "rough" surface (i.e. not coated in ceramic/pottery glaze) which is a good home for a build up of bacteria.

I'm not a clean freak by any means, but chipped mugs/plates get thrown out here if I can't recycle them as utensil holders/plant stands.

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# 3
Bronnie
Old 23-02-2010, 10:14 AM
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I dispose of mine when chipped too.

I used to buy cheapish (up to £20) everyday crockery sets but have become so fed up with the fact that they chip so easily. I bought a set 2 years ago from Tesco, plain cream set and it chipped almost immediately, with chips coming off in big slices from the dinner plates. It really should've gone back.

After that I decided to reuse rather than buy new for everyday. I find older crockery far more resistant to chipping. I picked up a set of old plain white dinner plates in the charity shop 6 for £2 and lots of pretty glass dishes. All still perfectly intact 18 months on. I dug out my wedding present china teaset, used a handful of times in 25 years, and use the side plates everyday. The china cups and saucers are used sometimes for desserts and look really pretty as well as giving a smaller portion..
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# 4
pigpen
Old 23-02-2010, 11:32 AM
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The chips expose the very porous pottery which harbours bacteria and moisture and encourages growth.. mine go in he bin immediately they are chipped!

I got 2 dinner services from studio cards years ago and they've done really well.. I have broken a couple but none have chipped they are really chunky which is fabulous.. They were half price at £25 for a 16 pc set.. so I got 2 lots.
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# 5
wssla00
Old 23-02-2010, 1:07 PM
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I would recycle them into something else like plant pots...

I buy mix and match stuff so when anything gets damaged replacing it is easy as I don't have to match it IYSWIM. I just keep the same shape and colours.
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# 6
Agapanthus
Old 23-02-2010, 2:11 PM
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It is possible to glue the chips back in with an epoxy adhesive if you have them, but the repair won't be dishwasher proof and even normal washing up in hot water will wash the adhesive out eventually. Best just use the item for decorative purposes after that.

Pottery /earthenware is fairly soft and chips quite easily. Porcelain is harder and more resistant to chipping. Try to find some porcelain crockery and you should get fewer chips (as long as you don't drop it on the floor or something!)
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# 7
Slinky_Malinky
Old 23-02-2010, 6:07 PM
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I have just invested in a Corelle dinner set. My main reason was because I wanted something that was very light to handle but they are also supposed to be chip resistant ( made from glass) Corelle is popular in the USA and folks there seem to find they last for decades.

As sold here in the UK.....

http://www.worldkitchen.co.uk/Catego....aspx?CatId=28
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# 8
tandraig
Old 23-02-2010, 7:54 PM
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I too find older china more resistant to chipping! and i dont mind mismatched china - find it charming actually. but saying that I had to buy a dinner service as i was short of plates for a family meal at christmas a few years ago so bought that white under a tenner one from Asda - and i still have it! used everyday and still no chips!
I wont used chipped china either as i think its unhygeinic so its always smashed up to use to crock up plant pots!
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# 9
meames
Old 23-02-2010, 8:05 PM
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I chipped an ikea plate today grr, so I guess it should have to go. It is a side palte so would only ever hold sandwiches really. If it gots boiling water on it to clean shouldn't that kill the bacteria?
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# 10
charlies-aunt
Old 23-02-2010, 9:22 PM
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I throw chipped mugs, cups and milk jugs but have been using a few saucers/plates with chipped edges for years without ill effect.

My reasoning is that its easier for bacteria to contaminate liquids but the edges of plates are rarely in direct contact with the food.

I would agree that older crockery is longer lasting - I started married life with a modern breakfast/dinner set but it quickly got trashed and for the last twenty years have been using the stock of plates, cups and glasses left over when my grandparents house was sold - mismatched yes but still going strong Must be 50 years old if they are a day but sadly I don't think that they will be in demand on Antiques Roadshow!

I use a motley collection old, unchipped saucers for individual plate pies - work great and they go into the freezer too without any problems. Cheaper than buying baking tins or foil trays and just the right size for pack-ups.

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# 11
babyshoes
Old 23-02-2010, 11:39 PM
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Just a thought - if you are determined to keep a piece with a small chip, couldn't you paint over the porous bit with something like nail polish or some sort of craft varnish to seal it? You might even be able to find a matching colour or one that wouldn't stand out too much, or just use clear if it is only sealing it you are concerned about.

I don't personally worry about the odd chip, though if it is in the part of the mug I drink from I tend to recycle or chuck it away as I am worried about cuts!
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# 12
jexygirl
Old 24-02-2010, 1:54 AM
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we arent allowed to have chipped crockery for H&S reasons, I would love to go for the mismatched look as i think its "rustic" but we decided on the white route! its all white, and tho i aim for all square to try and make it look like it matches, I cant afford to be too picky. Got a great ebay bargain on some square side / starter plates, and also a great commercial crockery discount place through a google search, has saved on gym subs as the main course plates weigh a dam ton! (if front of house annoy me, I make stuff in other bowls and insist that things like veg is served on a bowl on the same plate too! lol)
The commercial "chip resistant " stuff is holding up well and is only slightly more than domestic prices, so I will go commercial when i can afford to as it really seems to be more hardwearing.
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# 13
valk_scot
Old 24-02-2010, 7:33 AM
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It looks a bit cheap and nasty and it harbours germs. And chips can cut your mouth or fingers during use. Unless it's something decorative it's better to chuck chipped crockery out. My council takes chipped and broken china in the glass recycling box.

My chip-free crockery is a massive 8 place plus all extras set of Royal Doulton Lambeth Stoneware, accumulated by my mum in the 70's from the Royal Doulton seconds shop. The shapes of the basic pieces are absolutely classic and timeless, Mum went for a very simple pattern rather than a 70's one and the whole lot is dishwasher and oven proof. I've had all of it for ten years now and in that time one piece has got broken and one plate has got chipped. I've bought other pieces from Ebay and worked it up into a 12-place set, plus spares, plus a couple of extra serving dishes. And I've got all the funny 70's shapes as well, like the pottery goblets for prawn cocktails (!) and the taaaall coffee pot.
It will outlast me, that's for sure. 35 years old, that set, and looks like new.
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# 14
joyfull
Old 24-02-2010, 8:32 AM
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Thanks to everyone for the interesting posts. I already get the odd pretty & old plate from jumbles & boot fairs & they seem tough. You certainly get what you pay for these days. I'll also experiment with covering chips with craft varnish - we'll see. I wouldn't put food in contact with a chip so am pretty aware of hygiene issues.
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# 15
CCP
Old 24-02-2010, 11:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wssla00 View Post
I would recycle them into something else like plant pots...
Sorry for jumping into this thread but I just wanted to say thanks for this idea. I've got a blue-striped bowl that was / is a real favourite - it's too chipped to use but I haven't been able to bring myself to throw it out. I'm now going to do exactly as you suggest and turn it into a plant pot - I've got an African violet that needs a new home, so it can go and live in my favourite bowl. Thank you VERY much for suggesting it.
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# 16
wssla00
Old 24-02-2010, 11:33 AM
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# 17
oystercatcher
Old 24-02-2010, 1:00 PM
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This thread has just confirmed my suspicions that modern pottery just isn't made like the old stuff. I am frequently having to throw out items with chips on. Was blaming bad loading of the dishwasher but I think there's more to it. Stuff I bought back in late seventies and early eighties seemed to be much more hard wearing. In fact I think there is some stashed up in the loft as I wanted bigger sets. I think I shall ressurect some rather than buying yet more cheap replacements.

I have some Tesco's 'value' white bowls, plain white glass type like pyrex and they seem quite hardwearing just not particularly pretty.

Last edited by oystercatcher; 24-02-2010 at 1:01 PM. Reason: typo
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# 18
wssla00
Old 24-02-2010, 1:02 PM
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Everything is like that now though. I had a brilliant washing machine which last six years and it was one from the 70's then it sadly died and I got a new one which lasted about a month over the warranty GRRRR Must be our attitudes to consumption :S
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# 19
oystercatcher
Old 24-02-2010, 1:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wssla00 View Post
Everything is like that now though. I had a brilliant washing machine which last six years and it was one from the 70's then it sadly died and I got a new one which lasted about a month over the warranty GRRRR Must be our attitudes to consumption :S
This is so true. Thing is I remember back in the seventies relations complaining that items didn't last as long and five or six years was though to be 'not long' ! My parents expected electrical items to last 10 to 20 years ! Unimaginable now ! It seems so sad that the young are now 'preconditioned' to upgrade items like phones, furniture, household items at what seems to me very short intervals.

I am hoping the recession will encourage people to 'buy to last' but equally it could swing more towards the cheaper side of the market if that's all they can afford at the time
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# 20
babyshoes
Old 24-02-2010, 4:37 PM
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This phenomenon I believe is called 'planned obsolescence' - manufacturers plan for things to break sooner rather than later so consumers are forced to replace them, thereby increasing profits for the manufacturers...

Not sure if crockery is subject to this, may just be made of cheaper materials to keep costs down, but it does have the same side effect of allowing the manufacturers to sell more...

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