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    • cooking-mama
    • By cooking-mama 14th Sep 09, 11:18 AM
    • 2,066Posts
    • 2,392Thanks
    cooking-mama
    Anyone interested in a Remoska RECIPE ONLY topic?
    • #1
    • 14th Sep 09, 11:18 AM
    Anyone interested in a Remoska RECIPE ONLY topic? 14th Sep 09 at 11:18 AM
    morning moneysavers,hope no-one minds me suggesting this as ive only just joined(been reading posts for a while tho)im very interested in the Remoska topic,but it is so long and very time consuming to search through it all looking for recipes/ideas,so i wondered if anyone would be interested in a Recipe only topic.?,a bit like the "in my slow cooker today" discussion...I dont mind kicking it off as im planning on cooking lots in my brand new Remoska,later i will post what i make for dinner.
Page 4
    • Laura_Elsewhere
    • By Laura_Elsewhere 31st Oct 16, 10:16 AM
    • 68 Posts
    • 529 Thanks
    Laura_Elsewhere
    Is it possible to place a smaller dish inside it?.
    Originally posted by eandjsmum
    Yep, I do this all the time!

    I use smaller dishes, and I also steam vegetables on top of other foods, adding them towards the end of cooking time - I tried a few things, and eventually settled on wetting the vegetables, wrapping them in sopping-wet small piece of linen or kitchen paper, then wrapping that in a bit of tinfoil loosely. I tried just wrapping them in foil and the outer bits scorched, so the wet cloth/paper is to prevent that and add more water to steam - kitchen paper does work but often sticks to eg broccoli, but I found using a clean bit of old tea-towel works perfectly! I would just hang it to dry to use next time and wash it weekly; seemed to be fine!

    At one point I had a very late finish one day a week, and wasn't home til nearly 9pm and never felt like cooking, and ended up skipping meals or eating junk; I took to loading up the Remoska and getting my parents to switch it on for me (I lived with them then) at about 8.15 - I'd have a round silicon dish with a portion of sticky toffee pudding, extra dates and sauce, covered with a bit of foil to prevent scorching on top; another silicon dish, rectangular, just held three sausages and some sliced onions to cook in the fat, and a small potato sat loose to bake in its jacket; a bit of broccoli or kale wrapped up and put on top, or else some salad (uncooked!), and I had a lovely little two-course hot meal ready for me!
    • eandjsmum
    • By eandjsmum 31st Oct 16, 9:03 PM
    • 373 Posts
    • 4,503 Thanks
    eandjsmum
    Thanks Laura


    I will give it a go next week.
    • Dragoneti
    • By Dragoneti 2nd Jan 18, 3:36 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Dragoneti
    I found this forum today & thought I would add my Toad in the Hole recipe that I use-
    TOAD IN THE HOLE
    REMOSKA
    Ingredients

    Try this with a 'Cumberland' ring.

    1 egg
    56 g plain flour. (Type 45/55 in France)
    75 ml milk
    (Precook sausages in Remoska lift out, pour in batter, replace sausages, cook.)
    • Ben84
    • By Ben84 6th Jan 18, 10:10 PM
    • 2,922 Posts
    • 3,582 Thanks
    Ben84
    I do small appliance repairs, and I took a remoska apart a few years ago to fix it. The model I had (apparently it was bought around 2012 from Lakeland) wasn't reassuring. The electrical insulation is very limited. They do not have a sealed element, instead the lid contains an uninsulated coil of wire much like the glowing wires inside toasters or hairdryers, held away from the metal lid by ceramic beads. Dropping the lid or denting it could very easily break them and short the element to the lid. Wires like this can also snap from thermal fatigue or being dropped, much like lightbulb filaments do. There are also many holes in the lid and gaps where steam or water can easily get inside and short the element to the case - as it had with this remoska, which is why it had been bought to me. I also noticed that the unit contained soldered wires in the handle - which is a poor choice for a device intended to get hot as these may melt if the device overheats. I did not see any thermal cut out either. Exposed metal contacts were also very close to each other, few mm gap at most. I've taken apart hundred of devices and never seen anything like this. Fortunately the owner had a relatively modern consumer unit (fuse box) with an RCD and it was immediately tripping because of the water in the lid.

    Anyway, my conclusion was that the remoska has little to no safety features and many ways it can fail dangerously. Its safety is very much down to your house's wiring and what kind of consumer unit you have. Faulty earthing for example would make this a dangerous device. If you have proper earthing to the socket and a working RCD, the hazards are reduced, but the lack of safety features in it are still a risk as wiring and consumer units do develop faults or can be installed badly - sometimes being used in this state for years without anyone realising.
    • Laura_Elsewhere
    • By Laura_Elsewhere 6th Jan 18, 11:18 PM
    • 68 Posts
    • 529 Thanks
    Laura_Elsewhere
    I do small appliance repairs, and I took a remoska apart a few years ago to fix it. The model I had (apparently it was bought around 2012 from Lakeland) wasn't reassuring. The electrical insulation is very limited. They do not have a sealed element, instead the lid contains an uninsulated coil of wire much like the glowing wires inside toasters or hairdryers, held away from the metal lid by ceramic beads. Dropping the lid or denting it could very easily break them and short the element to the lid. Wires like this can also snap from thermal fatigue or being dropped, much like lightbulb filaments do. There are also many holes in the lid and gaps where steam or water can easily get inside and short the element to the case - as it had with this remoska, which is why it had been bought to me. I also noticed that the unit contained soldered wires in the handle - which is a poor choice for a device intended to get hot as these may melt if the device overheats. I did not see any thermal cut out either. Exposed metal contacts were also very close to each other, few mm gap at most. I've taken apart hundred of devices and never seen anything like this. Fortunately the owner had a relatively modern consumer unit (fuse box) with an RCD and it was immediately tripping because of the water in the lid.

    Anyway, my conclusion was that the remoska has little to no safety features and many ways it can fail dangerously. Its safety is very much down to your house's wiring and what kind of consumer unit you have. Faulty earthing for example would make this a dangerous device. If you have proper earthing to the socket and a working RCD, the hazards are reduced, but the lack of safety features in it are still a risk as wiring and consumer units do develop faults or can be installed badly - sometimes being used in this state for years without anyone realising.
    Originally posted by Ben84
    Ben, thankyou for posting this.

    Two things - one is that the design completely changed a few years ago, possibly to address these safety issues?
    But that doesn't change the fact that plenty of us are using old one s- mine dates from late 2006, iirc.

    Secondly, you'll be pleased to know that my chap is like you and dismantles things for mending them, and we've just bumped the Remoska right up to the top of the list for being dismantled, examined and either safety features added or somehow we replace it...

    As friends reported problems with their shorting when used with a lot of liquid, I use mine mostly for baking - I make sausage rolls, fairy cakes, jam tarts, baked potatoes... I avoid anything with a lot of liquid involved - I used to make soups and stews but now I just use it as an oven, not as a saucepan.

    Thanks again. I shall be very very wary of it until my chap's had a chance to dismantle it!
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