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    • lewt
    • By lewt 5th May 06, 10:30 AM
    • 7,485 Posts
    • 9,124 Thanks
    lewt
    • #2
    • 5th May 06, 10:30 AM
    • #2
    • 5th May 06, 10:30 AM
    i thought 3 ft down for a 6ft fence but might be wrong...
    If i upset you don't stress, never forget that god aint finished with me yet.
  • aliasojo
    • #3
    • 5th May 06, 10:32 AM
    • #3
    • 5th May 06, 10:32 AM
    Mmmmmmm I thought it was a third of eventual height, on average. 3' would be half the eventual height. Not sure that's right? :confused:

    Anyone else confirm or refute?
    Herman - MP for all!
  • Mikeyorks
    • #4
    • 5th May 06, 11:16 AM
    • #4
    • 5th May 06, 11:16 AM
    Agreed - it is generally accepted (less if you concrete it - more if in new and non-compacted soil) at one third of height above ground - so 2 feet in your case.
    If you want to test the depth of the water .........don't use both feet !
    • Randal
    • By Randal 5th May 06, 11:25 AM
    • 445 Posts
    • 208 Thanks
    Randal
    • #5
    • 5th May 06, 11:25 AM
    • #5
    • 5th May 06, 11:25 AM
    2' deep with a load of concrete around it for a 6' post should be OK. Fence posts normally come in an 8' length and most fence panels are 6' tall. Depending on how firm the ground is, make sure the concrete hole is at least 1' across. more if the ground is soft. Then place the post in and fill it full of concrete. You can also put old rocks and broken bricks into the hole to add balast and to avoid having to mix too much concrete.
    • Wig
    • By Wig 5th May 06, 11:44 AM
    • 13,307 Posts
    • 7,029 Thanks
    Wig
    • #6
    • 5th May 06, 11:44 AM
    • #6
    • 5th May 06, 11:44 AM
    By far the easiest method is to use metal fence post spike. about 2 feet long it is hammered into the ground, fence post slots in the top bit.

    http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?id=56843&ts=25851#
  • aliasojo
    • #7
    • 5th May 06, 2:07 PM
    • #7
    • 5th May 06, 2:07 PM
    Thanks everyone.

    Can't use the metal spike, Wig....too much concrete in area already. I'm going to have to use a jack hammer to break some of it up so that I can dig a suitable hole before concreting again.
    Herman - MP for all!
    • woodbutcher
    • By woodbutcher 6th May 06, 1:09 AM
    • 730 Posts
    • 304 Thanks
    woodbutcher
    • #8
    • 6th May 06, 1:09 AM
    • #8
    • 6th May 06, 1:09 AM
    Two feet is the correct depth for 8ft post,leaving 6ft above ground.The hole needs to be about 12 to 15 inches across and it's amazing how deep 2ft is when you have to dig it out.Remember to tamp the concrete with a stick to release trapped air.
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