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  • FIRST POST
    • vein
    • By vein 9th Jun 09, 9:50 PM
    • 87Posts
    • 25Thanks
    vein
    Installing a Gas Cooker
    • #1
    • 9th Jun 09, 9:50 PM
    Installing a Gas Cooker 9th Jun 09 at 9:50 PM
    I've never had a Gas cooker of my own since leaving my parents house so never had the problem of installing one. Before I go on I've not bought a gas cooker yet so I'm not going to blow up half the area and I'm not one for messing about with Gas.

    In the flat I'm in just now there is a connection for the gas and it looks like I just plug in the cooker and thats it. Is it really that simple??

    Its just that when I'm looking online I'm finding that the companies offer installation of the cooker. The one I'm looking at just now is £59 to install so I'm not going to pay some dude to plug a connection into the mains if that's all it is (unless this falls under some kind of rules and regs regarding Gas that is!!).

    If I cant do this myself I'll get my mate round who is corgi registered to do it for me but I'm keen to find out if I can just do it myself.

    Cheers
Page 1
    • olias
    • By olias 9th Jun 09, 10:42 PM
    • 3,503 Posts
    • 3,974 Thanks
    olias
    • #2
    • 9th Jun 09, 10:42 PM
    • #2
    • 9th Jun 09, 10:42 PM
    If you have the gas supply already and the correct terminal fitting, then it is just a bayonet fitting, a bit like putting a lightbulb in, you just push it in and twist it. Easy!

    Olias
    • vein
    • By vein 10th Jun 09, 8:20 AM
    • 87 Posts
    • 25 Thanks
    vein
    • #3
    • 10th Jun 09, 8:20 AM
    • #3
    • 10th Jun 09, 8:20 AM
    If you have the gas supply already and the correct terminal fitting, then it is just a bayonet fitting, a bit like putting a lightbulb in, you just push it in and twist it. Easy!

    Olias
    Originally posted by olias
    Its really that easy?? I suspected it might be but then it seems mad that the suppliers of the cooker would want £59 to do that!

    Thanks
    • macman
    • By macman 10th Jun 09, 8:42 AM
    • 41,290 Posts
    • 16,955 Thanks
    macman
    • #4
    • 10th Jun 09, 8:42 AM
    • #4
    • 10th Jun 09, 8:42 AM
    Its really that easy?? I suspected it might be but then it seems mad that the suppliers of the cooker would want £59 to do that!

    Thanks
    Originally posted by vein
    Correct. And you'd be equally mad to pay it. But many people assume that it requires professional installation.
    That £59 might possibly cover removal and disposal of an old cooker as well
    No free lunch, and no free laptop
  • Atelier
    • #5
    • 10th Jun 09, 8:54 AM
    • #5
    • 10th Jun 09, 8:54 AM
    The bayonet fittings are very easy and self sealing and I have to put my hand up to having connected one up myself for the gas tumble dryer.

    You do not need to get a CORGI (or whatever they are called now) person in for disconnecting and reconnecting a cooker. These are explicitly excluded in THE GAS SAFETY (INSTALLATION AND USE) REGULATIONS 1998
    SI 1998 NO 2451

    I understand that a new cooker should be installed by a qualified person not for the bayonet connection but for the commissioning of the actual appliance to ensure that it is not leaking gas.

    It would be interesting to find out whether your £59 gets a qualified person or a delivery man who does exactly what you would do.



    Its really that easy?? I suspected it might be but then it seems mad that the suppliers of the cooker would want £59 to do that!

    Thanks
    Originally posted by vein
  • papalaz
    • #6
    • 10th Jun 09, 8:56 AM
    • #6
    • 10th Jun 09, 8:56 AM
    you will need to buy the connection hose yourself tho, they dont usually supply this with new cookers. also the cooker you buy will most likely need electrical connection for the timer/fan. make sure the model u choose is suitable for a flat. They are required to have a flame failure device if buying from new.
  • Pssst
    • #7
    • 10th Jun 09, 9:10 AM
    • #7
    • 10th Jun 09, 9:10 AM
    The situation is that if you have a cooker which has a hose attached to it and the right plug in fitting is already fitted in the wall,then you can just plug it in as it is not deemed to be a fixed appliance. You would have to do things like check that it is level,fit a stability bracket/chain if required.

    If however any assembly/making of joints (not weed!) is required,then that would legally require a competent person.

    If the cooker is supplied new,it is unlikely to have a hose attached.

    Further,there are at least two types of hose/plug connectors commonly in use for domestic cookers.

    £59 isnt bad. Some women pay that for a hair do.
  • Tia_Maria06
    • #8
    • 10th Jun 09, 9:13 AM
    • #8
    • 10th Jun 09, 9:13 AM
    A little tip for when you have plugged it in.....My very clever (brave) friend installed mine for me, and she put washing up liquid on the join when she'd done, if it blowed bubbles there is a leak.
  • adam dowsing
    • #9
    • 3rd Jul 09, 9:19 AM
    • #9
    • 3rd Jul 09, 9:19 AM
    I'm affraid that it is a legal requirement to have a newly installed gas appliance tested and commisioned by an appropriately qualified person. The connection itself can be made by the homeowner but it requires a compitent person to commision to ensure it is safe and to validate the appliance waranty. With regards to the quote about using washing up liquid to test for the leak this is DEFINATELY NOT GOOD PRACTISE as it is corrosive to metal fittings and the rubber hose. It is also not designed to find gas leaks and is the wrong consistency to do so. My advice is you pay the £59 for a professional to do so as its a small price to pay to ensure the installation is safe.
    • Canucklehead
    • By Canucklehead 3rd Jul 09, 4:21 PM
    • 6,264 Posts
    • 3,371 Thanks
    Canucklehead
    Hi

    I think the best tip would be to Read The Installation Instructions. Then see how you feel about DIY.
    I don't understand why you don't get your GSR mate (formerly Corgi) to do it. Should cost a couple of beers?:confused:

    GSR.
    Ask to see CIPHE (Chartered Institute of Plumbing & Heating Engineering)
    • Ionkontrol
    • By Ionkontrol 3rd Jul 09, 5:12 PM
    • 773 Posts
    • 442 Thanks
    Ionkontrol
    http://www.corgi-direct.com/catalogue/Everyday-Essentials/PH12-Arctic-Ltd-Gas-Leak-Detector-Spray.aspx
  • inspect
    I've never had a Gas cooker of my own since leaving my parents house so never had the problem of installing one. Before I go on I've not bought a gas cooker yet so I'm not going to blow up half the area and I'm not one for messing about with Gas.

    In the flat I'm in just now there is a connection for the gas and it looks like I just plug in the cooker and thats it. Is it really that simple??

    Its just that when I'm looking online I'm finding that the companies offer installation of the cooker. The one I'm looking at just now is £59 to install so I'm not going to pay some dude to plug a connection into the mains if that's all it is (unless this falls under some kind of rules and regs regarding Gas that is!!).

    If I cant do this myself I'll get my mate round who is corgi registered to do it for me but I'm keen to find out if I can just do it myself.

    Cheers
    Originally posted by vein
    Sure, go ahead and fit it yourself, save yourself a couple of pounds.

    But how do you know that it’s safe.........:confused:

    There’s more to fitting a gas appliance than meets the eye. Money saving is good but not when it compromises safety.
    • CKdesigner
    • By CKdesigner 4th Jul 09, 2:00 PM
    • 1,191 Posts
    • 617 Thanks
    CKdesigner
    Hi

    I think the best tip would be to Read The Installation Instructions. Then see how you feel about DIY.
    I don't understand why you don't get your GSR mate (formerly Corgi) to do it. Should cost a couple of beers?:confused:

    GSR.
    Originally posted by Canucklehead

    Easily best advice here.

    I think if you have to ask for advice on a forum with regard to connecting a gas cooker then it would be best if you asked your gas fitter friend to do it.
  • ktuludays
    how you can guarantee that the person fitting it is competent?

    because they have a GSR card that makes them error free does it. they may not do it as well as a competent diy'er.

    don't get me wrong i understand the regs and why they are there but the law does not state that it has to be by a GSR fitter just a competent person.
    You got to get through what you've got to go through to get what you want but you got to know what you want to get through what you got to go through.
    • 03022242
    • By 03022242 5th Jul 09, 12:44 AM
    • 333 Posts
    • 86 Thanks
    03022242
    its just another job for another person to do for us to keep him in a job..

    thats the only reason i can think of.. but i think some cookers alro require earthing which yes i would pay for, but not £59..

    an hours job max at £30
    Named after my cat, picture coming shortly
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