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  • Pew Pew Pew Lasers!
    • #2
    • 14th May 09, 3:09 PM
    • #2
    • 14th May 09, 3:09 PM
    No more than an hour's labour.
  • NickWarren
    • #3
    • 14th May 09, 4:05 PM
    • #3
    • 14th May 09, 4:05 PM
    I'd say about 20 - 30 quid at most.
    War does not decide who is right, It decides who is left.
    • anewman
    • By anewman 14th May 09, 4:19 PM
    • 8,773 Posts
    • 6,257 Thanks
    anewman
    • #4
    • 14th May 09, 4:19 PM
    • #4
    • 14th May 09, 4:19 PM
    Yeah I think I paid about £30 when I had it done. Now I do as much DIY as possible and know how easy it is on my particular car to take the drums off, clean them up, loosen the handbrake cable, adjust the shoes properly (the self-adjust mechanism never works), then put it all back together adjusting the bearings properly, and adjust the handbrake - I wouldn't pay again.

    It always seems to get knackered when the MOT tester gets their hands on it anyway. When parking the car don't use the handbrake excessively, only use it as is enough to secure the car (2 to 3 clicks when properly adjusted), and keep it in first gear when parked. If you pull hard all the way up you just stretch the cable.

    Unexpected things to be prepared for are the need for new shoes (they last much longer than front pads) and new wheel cylinders if there is any evidence of leaking or being seized. But neither of these will be particularly expensive.
    Last edited by anewman; 14-05-2009 at 4:22 PM.
  • mikey72
    • #5
    • 14th May 09, 6:01 PM
    • #5
    • 14th May 09, 6:01 PM
    On my Peugeot 107, you can tighten the cable, which is under the car, so drive it on the ramps, and tighten it up, probably 15mins maximum.
    However, it didn't work when I did it, it just goes slack again.
    So remove the back drums, (eventually) clean up all the adjusters, check the shoes over, put it all back, new hub nuts and covers, as the old ones shouldn't be re-used on this car, re-adjust the handbrake, probably now one to two hours, plus the parts. I don't know the Kia, but it could be either scenario.
    • gilbert and sullivan
    • By gilbert and sullivan 14th May 09, 9:38 PM
    • 2,969 Posts
    • 1,984 Thanks
    gilbert and sullivan
    • #6
    • 14th May 09, 9:38 PM
    • #6
    • 14th May 09, 9:38 PM
    How things have changed, it seems a lifeteime ago when a boyfriend/brother/dad would roll his sleeves up and do minor jobs like this for a loved one.

    Luckily in our house (and most of family/cronies') we're still in a timewarp and chaps don't mind getting their hands dirty....it's called being a man..

    Anyway sexism aside...ir may be a simple adjust up which could be quarter of an hour, or it may need the brake shoes (can't imagine there being rear discs on a Picanto, but i'm not absolutely sure) cleaning up or replacing, which could mean possible new parts and an hour or so's labour.
    Somebody should really pull the rear drums off for a look see, Picanto handbrakes are normally pretty good.

    Get on the blower to a proper bloke (as above) who knows how to fix things..
  • goldspanners
    • #7
    • 15th May 09, 12:25 AM
    • #7
    • 15th May 09, 12:25 AM

    Get on the blower to a proper bloke (as above) who knows how to fix things..
    Originally posted by gilbert and sullivan
    give out your number then g&s.
    ...work permit granted!
  • Apples2
    • #8
    • 15th May 09, 10:55 AM
    • #8
    • 15th May 09, 10:55 AM
    I have no idea about Ka's but the Mk3 Mondeo's had handbrake problems the same as that described by the OP.

    The Mondeo hadbrake applied pressure directly to the rear disks the same as the normal footbrake.

    When the handbrake was applied it held the car okay on a hill. Once the brake disk cools down it contracts, so the braking force holding the car is reduced, this led to the car rolling away.

    I believe they fixed it but the temporary solution was to push the footbrake down whilst pulling the handbrake on (because your foot can apply much more pressure to the brake disk).

    It made a lot of sence and something I continued to do whilst parking on a hill (until I get shot of the money pit)
    • gilbert and sullivan
    • By gilbert and sullivan 15th May 09, 8:29 PM
    • 2,969 Posts
    • 1,984 Thanks
    gilbert and sullivan
    • #9
    • 15th May 09, 8:29 PM
    • #9
    • 15th May 09, 8:29 PM
    give out your number then g&s.
    Originally posted by goldspanners

    Me?...it you that's got the golden bits, show em off lad..
  • goldspanners
    Me?...it you that's got the golden bits, show em off lad..
    Originally posted by gilbert and sullivan
    what my "proper bloke bits"?
    ...work permit granted!
  • asbokid
    Find a Haynes manual for your motor and DIY! Have a scour of ebay and amazon marketplace where the books often go for less than a fiver.

    You can tell an authentic one - it will have oil and grease marks over the very pages you want to read!
    • dopester
    • By dopester 17th May 09, 4:32 AM
    • 4,742 Posts
    • 13,475 Thanks
    dopester
    If parking on a slope, I alway use the handbrake (applied firmly) - and put the car in gear.

    Leaving it in gear is another mechanism to use, to stop a rolling away.
  • cowbutt
    I have no idea about Ka's but the Mk3 Mondeo's had handbrake problems the same as that described by the OP.

    The Mondeo hadbrake applied pressure directly to the rear disks the same as the normal footbrake.

    When the handbrake was applied it held the car okay on a hill. Once the brake disk cools down it contracts, so the braking force holding the car is reduced, this led to the car rolling away.

    I believe they fixed it but the temporary solution was to push the footbrake down whilst pulling the handbrake on (because your foot can apply much more pressure to the brake disk).

    It made a lot of sence and something I continued to do whilst parking on a hill (until I get shot of the money pit)
    Originally posted by Apples2
    I read that the fix for the Mondeo's handbrake was to modify the ratchet so that it didn't start clicking until much higher in its range of travel (i.e. when the handbrake was properly applied).

    I do as you do and apply the handbrake with the footbrake firmly applied, as advised in the manual.

    To the OP, check your manual for advice.
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