Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
Page 1
  • 1984ReturnsForReal
    • #2
    • 17th Mar 09, 10:54 AM
    • #2
    • 17th Mar 09, 10:54 AM
    if they have the smallest piece of evidence or intelligence, Yes & you wouldnt even know.
    • RubyBish
    • By RubyBish 17th Mar 09, 10:55 AM
    • 142 Posts
    • 71 Thanks
    RubyBish
    • #3
    • 17th Mar 09, 10:55 AM
    • #3
    • 17th Mar 09, 10:55 AM
    All banks have a legal obligation to submit a report detailing customers and the interest earnt and the tax deducted. This is known as an S17 report IIRC. HMRC will use these reports to match up against individuals and then pursue any discrepencancies directly with the individual.

    How effective the matching process is, is debatable.
    • musehead
    • By musehead 17th Mar 09, 11:07 AM
    • 300 Posts
    • 78 Thanks
    musehead
    • #4
    • 17th Mar 09, 11:07 AM
    • #4
    • 17th Mar 09, 11:07 AM
    Can they look at individual transactions?
  • BruceyBonus
    • #5
    • 17th Mar 09, 11:27 AM
    • #5
    • 17th Mar 09, 11:27 AM
    Can they look at individual transactions?
    Originally posted by musehead
    If they have any evidence (or suspicion) of any wrong-doing, then yes they can.
  • cos69
    • #6
    • 17th Mar 09, 11:43 AM
    • #6
    • 17th Mar 09, 11:43 AM
    Can they look at individual transactions?
    Originally posted by musehead
    Don't remember what the limit is, but all transactions above the limit get flagged for potential money laundering activities. The limit varies, I think it may be £25k
    "How could I have been so mistaken as to trust the experts" - John F Kennedy 1962
  • Blah99
    • #7
    • 17th Mar 09, 7:45 PM
    • #7
    • 17th Mar 09, 7:45 PM
    If they have any evidence (or suspicion) of any wrong-doing, then yes they can.
    Originally posted by BruceyBonus
    Not without a warrant or court order, they can't. They can access the summary data (interest earned) etc but detailed transactions/balances are not free and open for inspection. Same goes for councils and other public bodies that might want to snoop on your records.
    Mmmm, credit crunch. Tasty.
  • lanmonkey
    • #8
    • 18th Mar 09, 10:46 AM
    • #8
    • 18th Mar 09, 10:46 AM
    Not without a warrant or court order, they can't. They can access the summary data (interest earned) etc but detailed transactions/balances are not free and open for inspection. Same goes for councils and other public bodies that might want to snoop on your records.
    Originally posted by Blah99
    This is what I always thought. I mean if it was that easy to look in someones bank account(s) there would be no benefit fraud.

    Glad to know this is in fact the case.

    Anyone got any links with details?

    Thanks
  • Stavros
    • #9
    • 18th Mar 09, 10:56 AM
    • #9
    • 18th Mar 09, 10:56 AM
    Schedule 1 production order within the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984, signed by a High court judge authorising officers to inspect bank accounts
    Liquidity is when you look at your investment portfolio and **** your pants
  • lanmonkey
    Schedule 1 production order within the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984, signed by a High court judge authorising officers to inspect bank accounts
    Originally posted by Stavros
    wow, so they would have to have pretty strong evidence before they even consider asking a judge for permission to look in yoru bank accounts
  • Stavros
    wow, so they would have to have pretty strong evidence before they even consider asking a judge for permission to look in yoru bank accounts
    Originally posted by lanmonkey
    Absolutely
    Liquidity is when you look at your investment portfolio and **** your pants
    • sabretoothtigger
    • By sabretoothtigger 18th Mar 09, 1:17 PM
    • 9,913 Posts
    • 6,555 Thanks
    sabretoothtigger
    HMRC can command the police and local army unit in recovery of any revenue it suspects due and may break into houses without a formal search warrant if circumstances demand it

    I wouldnt be surprised if project echelon had recorded your ip and dispatched agents as we speak
    Tokyo residential prices have gone from 4x London in 1990 to ¼ London in 2014
    There is no other agency of government which can overrule actions that we take
    by Greenspan, Federal Reserve
  • FraudBuster
    Check out the disclosure T&C's you signed when opening the bank account.
    • Farway
    • By Farway 18th Mar 09, 4:42 PM
    • 4,706 Posts
    • 3,824 Thanks
    Farway
    Check out the disclosure T&C's you signed when opening the bank account.
    Originally posted by FraudBuster
    Agree, but all I suspect have a clause about "disclosure within the law" or such like, even the Swiss have now fallen into line [with much arm twisting]
  • Blah99
    wow, so they would have to have pretty strong evidence before they even consider asking a judge for permission to look in yoru bank accounts
    Originally posted by lanmonkey
    Yes. They either try and trick you by getting you into a room and saying "so we know you earned X interest last year on undeclared amounts, want to tell us about it", when they don't actually have the detailed proof. Or if the amount earned is sufficiently huge (or your assets are clearly way beyond your means) they can use that as reasonable suspicion.

    There's also the proceeds of crime act, and SOCA have some pretty nasty powers but are fairly ineffective at using them.
    Mmmm, credit crunch. Tasty.
  • Blah99
    Agree, but all I suspect have a clause about "disclosure within the law" or such like, even the Swiss have now fallen into line [with much arm twisting]
    Originally posted by Farway
    Correct. Remember that the wonderful human rights legislation guarantees us all a right to pay stupid amounts in compensation to scum.. oh, no, sorry, I mean it guarantees us a right to life free of state interference. The T&Cs only allow the bank to disclose information when there is a legal obligation to do so. To do it at any other time is actually a breach of the data protection act, even if the data is going to a public body.

    The Swiss situation is extremely specific and limited in scope.
    Mmmm, credit crunch. Tasty.
    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 19th Mar 09, 11:09 AM
    • 6,750 Posts
    • 22,963 Thanks
    Primrose
    Interesting discussion. Was just wondering whether one could ask the Customs & Revenue whether they had ever asked for access to your account under the Freedom of Information Act? From time to time there have been relatively large sums of money going in and out of our accounts as we move our savings around in search of better interest rates/fixed rate bonds, especially when you have to move money through a current account before you can set up a new savings account and write out a cheque. I'm wondering whether this type of activity would trigger their interest?
    • LesU
    • By LesU 19th Mar 09, 11:54 AM
    • 307 Posts
    • 137 Thanks
    LesU
    wow, so they would have to have pretty strong evidence before they even consider asking a judge for permission to look in yoru bank accounts
    Originally posted by lanmonkey
    I think a great deal of naivety is being displayed in these posts that state that the police or customs need to go cap in hand to a judge.
    All they have to do is state a possible link to drugs or terrorism (aka money laundering) and they can do whatever they like.
    Remember, you're not safe even if you are an MP inside the House of Commons!
  • Blah99
    Interesting discussion. Was just wondering whether one could ask the Customs & Revenue whether they had ever asked for access to your account under the Freedom of Information Act? From time to time there have been relatively large sums of money going in and out of our accounts as we move our savings around in search of better interest rates/fixed rate bonds, especially when you have to move money through a current account before you can set up a new savings account and write out a cheque. I'm wondering whether this type of activity would trigger their interest?
    Originally posted by Primrose
    No, it wouldn't, unless you're talking very regular (daily to weekly) transfers of £10k+ batches, or regular transfers (monthly) of £100k+ batches, or individual transfers of £1m+.

    The FOI Act doesn't apply to individuals as such. If you're asking whether you've been put under surveillance you can make a DPA subject access request to get all info stored on you. However, if you imagine the situation where you're an organised crime boss, the DPA request can be ignored by the authorities. In that case, if you have a suspicion you're being placed under surveillance by any UK public body (police, SOCA, council etc) you can make a surveillance request to the Home Office. They will then look at your case and make a determination as to whether to lie to you or tell you the truth.

    The system is mainly intended for people who believe they've been wrongfully placed under surveillance or on a watch list. They can appeal to the Home Office to review their case, but it's a blind process because obviously the surveillance can't be confirmed or denied until it's found to be unrequired/unlawful.


    I think a great deal of naivety is being displayed in these posts that state that the police or customs need to go cap in hand to a judge.
    All they have to do is state a possible link to drugs or terrorism (aka money laundering) and they can do whatever they like. Remember, you're not safe even if you are an MP inside the House of Commons!
    You're confusing issues. Disregard the Damian Green thing, because that's irrelevant.

    Yes, the police could *potentially* engage a wiretap or surveillance on you without proper legal authorisation, but when the case went to court and discovery was initiated your legal defence would be a failure to follow the law. Remember that the police cannot lie or be generous with the facts to obtain a warrant and they must have reasonable cause for suspicion, which includes evidence to back it up. Fishing isn't allowed.
    Mmmm, credit crunch. Tasty.
  • Trollfever
    Fishing isn't allowed.



    http://cndyorks.gn.apc.org/mhs/index.htm

    All telecommunications traffic to and from Europe and passing through Britain can be intercepted at the base, including private telephone calls, faxes, emails and other communications. Much of the information is collected, processed and relayed back to the United States automatically.
    Last edited by Trollfever; 19-03-2009 at 7:43 PM. Reason: Addition,
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim's to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

4,743Posts Today

7,856Users online

Martin's Twitter