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Electric Oven replacing. Plug point but hardwiring?
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# 1
msb1302
Old 13-03-2009, 10:43 AM
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Default Electric Oven replacing. Plug point but hardwiring?

Hi all,

New to the board so thanks for reading firstly.

My built in electric oven has died on me. Which aint great when I have 2 children who love thri food. LOL.

Anyway I removed the oven from the unit to be confronted by a plug point! New house as well by the way so never looked behind the oven before. All the built in ovens I have seen need hardwiring and dont come with plugs or cable by the looks of things..

I am just wondering if anyone knows how easy it is to hardwire an built in electric oven when a plug point there??

Thank you in advance
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# 2
will-he-payitoff
Old 13-03-2009, 11:01 AM
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If your new oven is less than 2Kw it will be ok to plug it in where the old one was.
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# 3
msb1302
Old 13-03-2009, 11:45 AM
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Thanks for that.

But it looks like I have found one that does need hardwiring and comes with a plug. So a case of just swapping them over then
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# 4
thechippy
Old 13-03-2009, 11:17 PM
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I'm confused. It needs hard wiring but comes with a plug?
If it comes with a plug, then it means it can be plugged in.
If not, it generally means that it needs to be hard wired and will need a 32-40a dedicated supply. If that's the case, you will need to get an electrician in to sort out the supply.

Can you give any further info......
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# 5
prowla
Old 14-03-2009, 12:09 AM
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Our oven just has a normal 13 amp 3-pin mains plug.
The (separate) hob needs hard-wiring, but not the oven.
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# 6
premkit
Old 14-03-2009, 9:42 AM
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about 80% of single ovens are 13amp fused, some all singing and dancing are 20amp.

look at the data badge on the oven, it will be on the rebate when you open the door near the rubber seal. 3.1Kw is the max(3100w) this may sound a lot,
but most new kettles are 3Kw.

the new oven you put in should have access to the fuse ie above the worktop in a fused spur or a socket in an accessable position. not behind the oven.
hope this helps
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# 7
27col
Old 14-03-2009, 4:55 PM
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If it needed to be hard wired, it would not come with a plug. As suggested, it would be a good idea to double check the rating plate on the appliance, just to be certain what is the power required. If it is 3kw or less then you can plug it in to the socket. Premkit is right about having an accessible local isolation facility for use in case of an emergency or for maintenance.
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# 8
Dave1987
Old 10-12-2010, 10:31 PM
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Default hardwire or plug in ??

i am lookng to buy a new built in oven now it says it needs hardwiring but i have read on here that if its 3kw or less you can fit a 13a plug well the oven ive seen has an energy consumption of 0.79kw, so im ok to fit a 13a plug is that correct.

Last edited by Dave1987; 10-12-2010 at 10:33 PM.
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# 9
ormus
Old 10-12-2010, 11:18 PM
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generally speaking all modern ovens can be plugged into a 13 amp socket.
its the hobs that need to be hardwired. switching all the rings on together exceeds the 3kw limit.

you can usually tell which is which, by the flex that comes with the oven.
if it looks like an appliance or kettle flex, itll be a 13 amp jobby.
Get some gorm.

Last edited by ormus; 10-12-2010 at 11:20 PM.
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# 10
sillywilly
Old 10-12-2010, 11:38 PM
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This is the only example I have read on here where I think that the OP doesn't really have a clue and although people have tried to help in their replies I can imagine it being confusing.

Please do not try DIYing this - it could be lethal! Get some qualified electricians in to give you no obligation quotes - 3 if possible - and get them to do it.

I have learnt about the way ovens and hobs are wired in with a lot of sparks and a melted metal socket thinking "hmm that was close and not meant to happen - think I am going to turn all the electricity off now"!

Learnt my lesson and know how it all works now - but it is not a job to consider unless you have a sound knowledge of electrics because it could have serious consequences - electricution / fires.

Sorry if I have pi55ed on any of the more competent sparks fires on here - but this post worried me as I don't think she, or anyone should be mucking about with this if they don't have even a basic clue!
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# 11
zax47
Old 12-12-2010, 1:31 PM
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Sillywilly, seeing as the OP asked the question NEARLY TWO YEARS AGO then I don't think it's an issue!

Anyway, as some of my fellow sparkies have said above; Most SINGLE ovens are now <3kW, come with a 13A plug fitted and are thus designed to be plugged in. DOUBLE ovens and hobs are generally >3kW and must be hardwired to a dedicated circuit wired with a suitably sized cable and protected by a suitably sized breaker/fuse. What constitutes "suitably sized" is why we're trained electricians!

Last edited by zax47; 12-12-2010 at 1:45 PM.
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# 12
adalancs
Old 13-01-2011, 12:33 PM
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Question adalancs

Hi I had my kitchen refitted last year,and the kitchen electrics were redone as well.I had a Hotpoint OS897DPIX/HP built in oven fitted,which has been fine until I used the pyrolitic clean cycle for the first time and all the kitchen electrics tripped out.
When the electrics were reset and the cooker had cooled down it is fine again.I am not sure now whether the electrics or the cooker is at fault.I have read on on the internet somewhere that this cooker needs 32 amp fuse and a cooker point.Although the wire appears to be thicker than usual,my cooker has a plug into a socket.The manual says the maximum power absorbed is 3400-3600W.voltage 230-240V-50Hz.Any advice please whether I need an electrician or Hotpoint before I dare use the cleaning cycle again!
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# 13
marksw123
Old 30-01-2011, 9:41 PM
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Default It's a Hotpoint issue apparently

We have been having the same problem. Hotpoint came out and told us that it was our electrics, so we got them changed costing 85. This made no difference.

So then yesterday hotpoint came out again, a much more helpful guy and they told us it was a design problem and we need some new connections and sheathing inside the oven. There has been a technical bulletin released to hotpoint repair staff regarding the problem.

We are now waiting for spare parts and the guy is cominig back. We hope this solves it.

He also told us that it is OK plugged into a 13amp socket!

Last edited by marksw123; 30-01-2011 at 9:43 PM. Reason: I forgot the last line!
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# 14
adalancs
Old 02-02-2011, 1:19 PM
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Default Hotpoint issue on oven OS897DPIX

Thanks for replying to my problem regarding using pyrolitic cycle.I'm going to phone Hotpoint again.The first time I phoned they suggested I use the pyrolitic cycle again,and if the electrics tripped out again they would come and look at it,but if it was my electrics at fault they would make a "no fault" charge!I haven't used the cleaning cycle again as with all that heat I was a bit nervous something drastic might happen like the oven get on fire!Will let you know how I get on.
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# 15
macman
Old 02-02-2011, 1:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adalancs View Post
Hi I had my kitchen refitted last year,and the kitchen electrics were redone as well.I had a Hotpoint OS897DPIX/HP built in oven fitted,which has been fine until I used the pyrolitic clean cycle for the first time and all the kitchen electrics tripped out.
When the electrics were reset and the cooker had cooled down it is fine again.I am not sure now whether the electrics or the cooker is at fault.I have read on on the internet somewhere that this cooker needs 32 amp fuse and a cooker point.Although the wire appears to be thicker than usual,my cooker has a plug into a socket.The manual says the maximum power absorbed is 3400-3600W.voltage 230-240V-50Hz.Any advice please whether I need an electrician or Hotpoint before I dare use the cleaning cycle again!
If you have that plugged in to a 13A socket then clearly it's going to trip drawing 3400W, as that's in excess of 14A. How do the instructions say it should be wired? It needs a proper dedicated cooker circuit and a cooker connection unit.
Your cooker isn't faulty, the install is.
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# 16
adalancs
Old 03-02-2011, 2:21 PM
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Post oven or wiring?

Hi Macman.The instructions about connecting the electricity supply to the mains say to install a standardised plug corresponding to the load on the data plate,which is located on the appliance.It must be where you can't see it! Would that be the 3400-3600W? It goes on to say the appliance must be directly connected to the mains using an omnipolar switch with a minimum contact opening of 3mm installed between the appliance and the mains.The switch must be suitable for the charge indicated and must comply with current electrical regs(the earthing wire must not be interrupted by the switch)It also says to make sure that the appliance is earthed,the plug is compliant with the law and the socket can withstand the maximum power of the appliance ie 3400-3600W.So does that mean they are saying it is connected with a plug and socket? I think it might have been less of a problem if I'd bought an oven I could clean with Mr Muscle!
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# 17
marksw123
Old 05-02-2011, 11:53 PM
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My oven only has a max load of 2400 according to our instruction manual - hence why it can be plugged in. It draws less than a kettle, or electric heater! Hotpoint and an electrician confirmed ours is OK plugged in a 13amp socket, and hotpoint have also confirmed ours is a fault with the oven. He's coming to fit they new parts this week......
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# 18
Hmanckte
Old 09-07-2011, 7:53 PM
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have same problem. Hotpoint Changed unit but still the same. ELCB trips not current trip.
Did anybody get a solution to this so that I can clean my oven?
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