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    • narabanekeater
    • By narabanekeater 20th Feb 06, 4:58 PM
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    narabanekeater
    Help removing a dried on blood stain
    • #1
    • 20th Feb 06, 4:58 PM
    Help removing a dried on blood stain 20th Feb 06 at 4:58 PM
    I have just discovered a med size large blood stain on my daughters cot blanket. She pulled off a nail during the night. Luckily shes not bothered at all by it. Unlike me!
    Meanwhile ive now got a dried on blood stain on a £50 (pre mse) cot quilt.
    Can anyone please tell me what I might use to get rid of it. Its quite a delicate quilt
    Thanks in advance
    Allie and toddler Mollies whos totally unphased my Mummies screams on seeing blood!
Page 7
  • freebiz14
    A friend of mine told me that ammonia and liquid dish washing detergent works very well at getting rid of blood stain. Just soak the fabric in the solution for some time. I've never tried it myself but she said it works.
    • donny-gal
    • By donny-gal 3rd Jan 14, 5:39 AM
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    donny-gal
    I had a bad stain, wich had resisted everything, and many washings, think it was red wine though and not blood, and read to mix white vinegar and bio powder to a paste, and then spread it on and leave for 15 mins, then wash again, and it worked for that. Might be worth a try.
    DG
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    • zippychick
    • By zippychick 3rd Jan 14, 9:33 PM
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    zippychick
    Ive merged this with an older thread which should help


    Zip
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  • RachelBP
    Not to be TMI but any bright ideas to get it out of something you can't soak or bung in the wash... a matress!
    • janb5
    • By janb5 5th Mar 15, 8:29 AM
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    janb5
    I would try spraying with diluted vinegar in water in a spray bottle then patting it dry with towel?
    • jackieblack
    • By jackieblack 9th Aug 15, 12:09 PM
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    jackieblack
    Hi
    Any ideas for getting a blood/other bodily fluid (pus?) stain out of a pale green and white striped cotton tunic?
    DD is a student vet nurse on placement atm, so I've been constantly soaking and cleaning various bodily fluids from different items of her uniform over the last few weeks () but she forgot to tell me about these two marks on this tunic () and I didn't notice them as I was distracted by a much bigger blood patch on a different area of the item (which came out fine) until after it had been through the wash
    I've washed it 4 times and have tried soaking in cold water and using Vanish (various types) which usually shifts everything, but this is well 'set in' now I've been drying it in the sun, hoping the sun might fade the mark a bit.
    I can't use anything that will bleach the colour from the tunic as it is a uniform item, embroidered with her Uni's name and logo (and not cheap to replace!)
    Any suggestions for anything else I can try that might help at this stage, please?
    Last edited by jackieblack; 09-08-2015 at 12:12 PM.
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    • Butterfly Brain
    • By Butterfly Brain 9th Aug 15, 7:13 PM
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    Butterfly Brain
    I always use white vinegar/washing up liquid mixed to a paste with bicarb, leave for a couple of hours and then wash
    Blessed are the cracked for they are the ones that let in the light
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    • Nicki
    • By Nicki 9th Aug 15, 7:38 PM
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    Nicki
    I would try soaking in nappisan overnight, then wash with bio powder and another scoop of nappisan and dry in sunlight. The other product which used to work brilliantly even on old stains though I haven't seen it in the shops for years was Ace laundry bleach which despite the name doesn't bleach the colour out.
    • jackieblack
    • By jackieblack 9th Aug 15, 7:50 PM
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    jackieblack
    Thanks, Butterly Brain and Nicki,
    I managed to get some further improvement today by mixing some Ariel stain remover into a paste (although the instructions say you shouldn't do this) and leaving for about half an hour before washing out.
    It's definitely better, but still not completely gone.
    Can try white vinegar/washing up liquid and bicarb paste tomorrow, if necessary I can get some Nappisan next time I'm at the shops.
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    • ZaneCuellar1029
    • By ZaneCuellar1029 27th Dec 17, 2:22 PM
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    ZaneCuellar1029
    Ideally, you would want to tackle the stain with water right away. The fresher the blood is, the more effective it is to clean it off. And then, apply some soap on it. Give it a good rub all over the stain. And if you're dealing with light-color fabric, hydrogen peroxide (which will act as bleach) will be a good option. In worse cases when the blood has dried, you'll need to put more work into it. First, apply some pre-treatment products which could be found anywhere on the market. Then use enzyme-based laundry detergent to wash off the stain. This could be applied to bed sheets, shoes, and any kinds of fabric or leather materials.
    • Linda R
    • By Linda R 5th Jan 18, 4:00 PM
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    Linda R
    What NOT to use!
    I have just discovered a med size large blood stain on my daughters cot blanket. She pulled off a nail during the night. Luckily shes not bothered at all by it. Unlike me!
    Meanwhile ive now got a dried on blood stain on a £50 (pre mse) cot quilt.
    Can anyone please tell me what I might use to get rid of it. Its quite a delicate quilt
    Thanks in advance
    Allie and toddler Mollies whos totally unphased my Mummies screams on seeing blood!
    Originally posted by narabanekeater
    I'm not sure about silk, but one thing I am sure of is that you should absolutely not use any cleaner that contains an enzyme. Silk is made by an animal, the silk worm, therefore it contains proteins which are broken down by enzymes. Using them to get rid of the stains might work, but it would damage the material too. It's also a rather delicate material so you should begin with cleaning agents that are mild.
    Just thought I'd let you know before you ruined something you probably like.
    Have a great day.
    • Linda R
    • By Linda R 5th Jan 18, 4:11 PM
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    Linda R
    If it's dried blood an enzyme containing powder would work well, since blood is made of protein and that's exactly what enzymes break down. The catch is that you can't use it on any materials like silk, or wool. Because they're produced by animals, they also contain proteins and would be damaged by the cleaner also.
    An enzyme-containing agent you might have around the house is dishwashing detergent or pouches. Make a paste out of the powder and some water--NOT HOT--and apply it to the stains. Let it sit and soak a while, then toss in the washing machine or hand wash, if necessary.
    One thing to note. Don't ever use hot water on blood stains, or any others, for that matter. Hot water sets stains and you may never get them out.
    Hope that helps.
    Have a great day.
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 6th Jan 18, 9:06 AM
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    Pollycat
    I'm not sure about silk, but one thing I am sure of is that you should absolutely not use any cleaner that contains an enzyme. Silk is made by an animal, the silk worm, therefore it contains proteins which are broken down by enzymes. Using them to get rid of the stains might work, but it would damage the material too. It's also a rather delicate material so you should begin with cleaning agents that are mild.
    Just thought I'd let you know before you ruined something you probably like.
    Have a great day.
    Originally posted by Linda R
    Just to point out that the post you quoted was posted on 20th February 2006 so the blanket will probably be long-gone by now.
    But your advice may help someone else.
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