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cabbage leaves turning red
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# 1
phizzimum
Old 01-03-2009, 1:50 PM
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Default cabbage leaves turning red

I've had some winter cabbages growing in a pot and now the leaves are turning bright red. What does this mean? I've checked in my book on growing veg but couldn't find anything.

Do they need feeding with something? I'm wondering if it's because they've been in a pot not in the soil and maybe the compost has lost its nutrients or something...:confused:
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# 2
Lotus-eater
Old 01-03-2009, 4:05 PM
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It would suggest they are deficient in some nutrient, try giving them a feed with a soluble fertilizer if you can, whatever you have.

I presume the leaves are turning red at the edges and they aren't in a metal pot or something like that?
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# 3
phizzimum
Old 01-03-2009, 4:45 PM
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I'll see what I have in the shed...would tomato feed be alright?

why would metal pot make a difference? (excuse my ignorance!) the pot they're in is just an ordinary garden planter, but I did put copper tape around the pot to deter slugs.
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# 4
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Old 01-03-2009, 4:52 PM
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I believe that sometimes a metal (iron I guess) can make some plants go funny colours, something to do with the oxidising of the metal I suppose. Although I just searched very quickly for it and couldn't find anything, so maybe I'm making it up.

Tomato feed would be fine, a bit of diluted urine (sorry if you are squeamish) wouldn't hurt either.
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# 5
Raksha
Old 01-03-2009, 5:02 PM
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It could be a reaction to the very cold weather we've had recently.......
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# 6
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Old 01-03-2009, 5:16 PM
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I suppose it might be the cold weather, never say never. Although brassicas are usually very hardy. I suppose the roots could have been frozen, it being in a pot, but then I would expect it to almost be dead by now.

I'm still with a nutrient deficiency, Like to hear what others think about it though.
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# 7
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Old 01-03-2009, 7:01 PM
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Funnily enough I had a walk round the garden after I wrote earlier and some of my purple sprouting broccoli have gone purplish on the edges of the older leaves. I doubt I would have noticed it if I hadn't read this.
So I'm not sure if this is what you mean phizzmum, I would never usually worry about it, could you put up a photo?
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# 8
elliep
Old 01-03-2009, 7:08 PM
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What was that about the diluted urine? What does that have in that plants like? Is that a generally good tip for feeding plants?

Not that I want to go peeing all round my garden but any kind of free fertiliser helps
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# 9
angelavdavis
Old 01-03-2009, 7:22 PM
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Urine is high in nitrogen. Ideal for adding to compost heaps to boost them.
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# 10
phizzimum
Old 01-03-2009, 7:49 PM
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I'll take a photo tomorrow.

I'm not at all squeamish about the urine suggestion! Although I might not tell many people, might put them off eating my veg! Does it matter if it's urine from a man or woman? Remember reading that a man's wee is good for compost heap but not a woman's...is that right?

Thanks for all the replies everyone - I really appreciate it. I planted loads of cabbages and the slugs got all of them except the 3 I put in a pot, so they have great sentimental value to me!
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# 11
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Old 01-03-2009, 7:50 PM
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Its also very good for fertilising plants as well. You can dilute it by about a half. Or full strength on compost heaps. (I've used it full strength on fruit and veg with no problems, but it is said that it can be too strong)

I use it as a good home grown veg keeper. If someone comes round who is not a good friend, I make sure I point out that everything is watered with my own wee, amazing how many won't eat a tomato after that.... more for me

edit, looks like we have the same idea I used to think that it had to be a mans urine, but apparently not... they will be wanting the vote next :rolleyes:

Last edited by Lotus-eater; 01-03-2009 at 7:52 PM.
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# 12
phizzimum
Old 01-03-2009, 7:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lotus-eater View Post
edit, looks like we have the same idea I used to think that it had to be a mans urine, but apparently not... they will be wanting the vote next :rolleyes:
that's good - don't have to involve DH in any more of my batty ideas!
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# 13
elliep
Old 01-03-2009, 8:41 PM
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It'll be hard enough to persaude my DH to eat any of my veg anyway (he just doesn't 'do' veg) I think I'll be doing this kind of watering while he's at work and I won't tell him.

Is there any veg that won't like it? I read somewhere that peas and beans produce nitrogen and don't appreciate highly nigtrogenated (is that a word?) soil. So I'm guessing that if wee contains nitrogen they wouldn't like it?
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# 14
angelavdavis
Old 02-03-2009, 3:27 PM
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It depends on the usage of the urine as to whether male or female is preferred as male urine contains hormones which deters rats as well.

I think you can use either if you are just using it for its nitrogen value.
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# 15
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Old 02-03-2009, 3:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by angelavdavis View Post
It depends on the usage of the urine as to whether male or female is preferred as male urine contains hormones which deters rats as well.
I've never heard that one before. Mine certainly doesn't deter rats at all, in fact it seems to be an attractant.
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# 16
phizzimum
Old 03-03-2009, 5:36 PM
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I've taken a photo but can't work out how to include the image in my post.

the outer leaves are turning completely red, and yellowing a little too.

I haven't had a chance to put any fertiliser on them, so I'll stop fiddling about trying to load photos and go and do that instead!

thanks for all the advice everyone
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