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  • FIRST POST
    • vikkic
    • By vikkic 14th Feb 06, 2:28 PM
    • 19Posts
    • 2Thanks
    vikkic
    9.5kw or 10.5kw shower?
    • #1
    • 14th Feb 06, 2:28 PM
    9.5kw or 10.5kw shower? 14th Feb 06 at 2:28 PM
    Can anyone tell me whether it's worth paying the extra money for a 10.5kw electric shower, or will a 9.5kw be OK - I've got an 8.5kw at the moment which needs replacing and don't know whether the extra money is worth spending.

    Thanks
    Vikki
Page 1
    • Browntoa
    • By Browntoa 14th Feb 06, 3:02 PM
    • 29,945 Posts
    • 35,456 Thanks
    Browntoa
    • #2
    • 14th Feb 06, 3:02 PM
    • #2
    • 14th Feb 06, 3:02 PM
    the cabling + fuses for the existing one may not support the higher rated shower anyway
    I'm the Board Guide of the Referrers ,Telephones, Pensions , Shop Don't drop and Discount Code boards which means I'm a volunteer to help them run smoothly and I can move and merge posts there. However, please remember, board guides don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.
    • Sooler
    • By Sooler 14th Feb 06, 3:23 PM
    • 2,804 Posts
    • 1,987 Thanks
    Sooler
    • #3
    • 14th Feb 06, 3:23 PM
    • #3
    • 14th Feb 06, 3:23 PM
    As a 8.5 KW one had been sufficient we replaced ours with a 9.5 KW.

    We did have to have the wiring upgraded as the existing electrical cable (4mm) was too small for current requirements (8mm I think) and you also have to have a RCD circuit breaker device if you don't have a RCD fusebox.
  • mercurystar999
    • #4
    • 14th Feb 06, 5:32 PM
    • #4
    • 14th Feb 06, 5:32 PM
    No electric shower is that good. I wouldn't of thought you would notice a difference. Depending on what kind of plunbing system you have havr you thought of a power shower?
    • mr_fishbulb
    • By mr_fishbulb 14th Feb 06, 5:50 PM
    • 5,047 Posts
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    mr_fishbulb
    • #5
    • 14th Feb 06, 5:50 PM
    • #5
    • 14th Feb 06, 5:50 PM
    What's the difference between an electric shower and a power shower?
    I wish I could invest in taxes - they're the only thing guaranteed to go up.
    • caveat_emptor
    • By caveat_emptor 14th Feb 06, 6:12 PM
    • 648 Posts
    • 176 Thanks
    caveat_emptor
    • #6
    • 14th Feb 06, 6:12 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Feb 06, 6:12 PM
    What's the difference between an electric shower and a power shower?
    by mr_fishbulb
    Electric uses the pressure in the supply pipe, which if from loft tank can be low and power shower is pump assisted.
    Named after my cat, picture coming shortly
    • jennifernil
    • By jennifernil 14th Feb 06, 7:26 PM
    • 4,889 Posts
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    jennifernil
    • #7
    • 14th Feb 06, 7:26 PM
    • #7
    • 14th Feb 06, 7:26 PM
    What type of hot water system do you have? These electric showers are not that great, get it changed to run off "proper" hot water if you can. If you have a combi boiler you cannot have a "power shower", but usually the pressure is so good you would not need one. We recently replaced our daughter's electric shower with a thermostatic one through the bath mixer, it is so powerful the water bounces out of the bath!!!!! ( she has a combi boiler)
    • Doonhamer
    • By Doonhamer 14th Feb 06, 9:57 PM
    • 469 Posts
    • 152 Thanks
    Doonhamer
    • #8
    • 14th Feb 06, 9:57 PM
    • #8
    • 14th Feb 06, 9:57 PM
    Easiest and cheapest thing for you to do is to replace it with another electric one, though a thermostatic one off the hot water is much better.

    If you go for 10.5kW I would think that you will need 10mm≤ cable and I doubt that you will have this, I would be almost certain that you have 6mm≤.

    If you were happy with the 8.5kW one just go for the 9.5kW.
    Only Sheep Need A Shepherd
    • vikkic
    • By vikkic 15th Feb 06, 10:06 AM
    • 19 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    vikkic
    • #9
    • 15th Feb 06, 10:06 AM
    • #9
    • 15th Feb 06, 10:06 AM
    My cold water comes straight from the mains rather than stored in a tank.

    I'm sorry to be thick, but other than a 10kw shower heating the water quicker(??) what are the benefits? ie. what does it do that a 8.5kw or 9.5kw doesn't?

    Cheers
    Vikki
    • Browntoa
    • By Browntoa 15th Feb 06, 10:21 AM
    • 29,945 Posts
    • 35,456 Thanks
    Browntoa
    does nothing apart from heat the water quicker like you say

    I've got a 7kw one downstairs and an 8.5kw upstairs abd I don't really notice the difference once you have set the temperature to how you like it

    if it's a Triton shower they have a guide that shows you the equivalent modern model on their web site, my new one went straight back on the old plumbing, just had to re-align the cable slightly
    I'm the Board Guide of the Referrers ,Telephones, Pensions , Shop Don't drop and Discount Code boards which means I'm a volunteer to help them run smoothly and I can move and merge posts there. However, please remember, board guides don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.
    • dadrock
    • By dadrock 15th Feb 06, 11:53 AM
    • 111 Posts
    • 30 Thanks
    dadrock
    An electric shower should always be from the Mains pipe and not gravity-fed from a tank in the attic.

    Upgrade your cable to 10mm and consider a 9.8kw one?
    • Doonhamer
    • By Doonhamer 15th Feb 06, 12:06 PM
    • 469 Posts
    • 152 Thanks
    Doonhamer
    It's not that it heats the water quicker, it heats it more. The temperature dial on a shower alters the flow of water through the heater. The more powerful the shower the more flow you get at a given temperature.
    Only Sheep Need A Shepherd
    • Browntoa
    • By Browntoa 15th Feb 06, 12:17 PM
    • 29,945 Posts
    • 35,456 Thanks
    Browntoa
    kilowatt-hour

    The kilowatt-hour (symbolized kWh) is a unit of energy equivalent to one kilowatt (1 kW) of power expended for one hour (1 h) of time.

    so basic maths says 8.5 kw will heat water quicker than a 7 kw....

    flow has to do with the water pressure
    I'm the Board Guide of the Referrers ,Telephones, Pensions , Shop Don't drop and Discount Code boards which means I'm a volunteer to help them run smoothly and I can move and merge posts there. However, please remember, board guides don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.
    • Doonhamer
    • By Doonhamer 15th Feb 06, 12:55 PM
    • 469 Posts
    • 152 Thanks
    Doonhamer
    The temperature adjustment on an electric shower adjusts the flow of water through the shower, it is just a valve. The heater in the shower is a tiny tank that the water flows through. The more kW the shower has the bigger the temperature increase in the water between the inlet and outlet of the shower at a given flow. So a more powerful shower will heat the water more (faster if you like)allowing you to increase the flow. This means that a shower with more kW gives you more flow of water at the same temperature as a lower kW one.
    Only Sheep Need A Shepherd
    • grumbler
    • By grumbler 15th Feb 06, 2:29 PM
    • 50,949 Posts
    • 21,494 Thanks
    grumbler
    A few threads with useful information:
    Is this electric shower any good?
    Electric Power Shower
    What's the difference between a Power Shower and an Electric Shower?
    upgrading Shower
    Approximately how much will it cost to install an electric shower? (further links inside)
    We are born naked, wet and hungry...Then things get worse.

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  • BeepBeep
    Electric uses the pressure in the supply pipe, which if from loft tank can be low and power shower is pump assisted.
    by caveat_emptor
    Would a power shower just use a reservoir between the loft tank and shower with an integral pump? Would it use both cold and hot water feeds? I'm checking the web also for this info; but if anyone can point me in the direction of useful links for power showers, it'll be much appreciated. Thanks.
    • jennifernil
    • By jennifernil 15th Feb 06, 10:06 PM
    • 4,889 Posts
    • 2,016 Thanks
    jennifernil
    As the water is heated quicker you can turn it on more and get more "skoosh" , so a better shower.
  • bernlyn
    just bookmarking this
    • Doonhamer
    • By Doonhamer 16th Feb 06, 12:16 PM
    • 469 Posts
    • 152 Thanks
    Doonhamer
    Would a power shower just use a reservoir between the loft tank and shower with an integral pump? Would it use both cold and hot water feeds? I'm checking the web also for this info; but if anyone can point me in the direction of useful links for power showers, it'll be much appreciated. Thanks.
    by BeepBeep
    A tank fed thermostatic shower has a hot and a cold feed to it. To ensure that the hot and cold pressures are equal the cold comes off the header tank in the loft that feeds the hot water tank, not direct from the mains. So both sides of the shower have the pressure generated by the hight of the loft tank above the shower head.

    To make this a power shower you fit a twin impeller pump. The cold goes in one section and the hot in the other. It goes just before the shower, so it is after the hot water tank.

    It effectively sucks the water from the hot tank and from the header tank to give a flow higher than you just get from gravity alone. It is as if you have raised the header tank higher up.

    A typical pump is abour 2 Bar and a 1 Bar is 10m of water. So a 2 Bar power shower is like having your header tank 20m above your shower.
    Only Sheep Need A Shepherd
  • fatbobbutler
    I've got the opposite problem, I've had an 10.5kw shower for 3 years and it finally gave up the ghost last week. I looked online for a replacement and noticed the 9.5kw model at half price and so obviously snapped it up. Can I down grade from 10.5 to 9.5 using the existing wiring???
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