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Converting flat garage roof to pitched and tiled - any advice?
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# 1
Raksha
Old 21-02-2009, 5:18 PM
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Default Converting flat garage roof to pitched and tiled - any advice?

OH wants to convert our flat concrete garage roof to a pitched tiled roof....... Several of the neighbours have alread done the same before we moved here. Problem is, owner of next doors property (garages are ajoined) doesn't want to do his.........

How hard would it be to DIY and do we need planning permission?

Roof is currently covered in felt which has started leaking (electric lights in garage and utility area O/S because of it ) How hard is it to replace this felt DIY - cost?
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# 2
planning_officer
Old 21-02-2009, 8:55 PM
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You would probably only need planning permission if the garage projects forward of the main house (because then the extended roof would be located closer to a highway than the original house) - if it is to the rear or completely to the side with no part of it projecting forward of the house, it would be classed as permitted development. Although, having said that, if you live in an AONB, National Park or conservation area, then you will permission no matter where the garage is. The only other reason for it needing planning permission is if permitted development rights have been removed for your property - the council can advise you on this.

Last edited by planning_officer; 21-02-2009 at 9:03 PM.
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1jim
Old 22-02-2009, 3:00 PM
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we briefly looked into this last year when all of the felt blew off the garage roof, we wanted to change to pitched roof from a flat one to prevent the same happening again, we called the council who said we would propably need planning permission as we had already put on a conservatory which had probably used all of the "permitted development" rights, we were told that the volume of the garage would increase (because of the angle of the roof) so might exceede this. The whole process of getting drawings done and submitting to see if we needed permission and then maybe try and get permission was just going to take too long (remember the felt had all blown off) so we just got on and repaired it...shame really as I think it would have looked so much better being pitched with tiles
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planning_officer
Old 22-02-2009, 11:08 PM
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Just to clarify, the post above refers to volume restrictions to the property, including previous additions, such as a conservatory - whilst that is all very true prior to 1 Oct 2008, the legislation changed then - so it is no longer volume based and you don't necessarily need to take account of previous extensions.
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mikey72
Old 22-02-2009, 11:11 PM
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We looked at this, but didn't bother, as the garage walls and foundations wouldn't take the weight of the new roof.
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# 6
1jim
Old 23-02-2009, 2:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by planning_officer View Post
Just to clarify, the post above refers to volume restrictions to the property, including previous additions, such as a conservatory - whilst that is all very true prior to 1 Oct 2008, the legislation changed then - so it is no longer volume based and you don't necessarily need to take account of previous extensions.
Thanks planning_officer.....if only my roof had blown off a few months later than it did....oh well, will know for next time I guess, but as it my current felting has a 10year guarantee it could be some time before I get around to it
thanks
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# 7
Raksha
Old 23-02-2009, 7:11 PM
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Thanks for all the help folks - other neighbours with identical garages have already had the work done succesfully, so foundations and weight shouldn't be an issue.
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# 8
Mr Warren
Old 23-02-2009, 9:14 PM
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Last June, the neighbour and I did that exact same conversion. The felt on his side of the joined garage was severely damaged and mine was going the same way. It was great fun to do the job (although we did not bother with contacting the council......) i am ok with DYI and next door is not but i couldn't have done it withouth his help.
Used the two outside walls (garage entrance and rear wall) as start up and screwed 4 x 3" rough timber into existing garage joists (every two joists). The frame was 2 x triangles bolted together and reenforced with noggins that met on the boundary (height of the triangles back to back). The height was "calculated" in such a way that i wasted the least timber out of every length. The slope ended up what it was. Got some 20mm marine ply nailed on those timbers and used corrugated bitumous sheets from Wickes as final covering. Verticals were covered with same marine ply and shiplap. The void created was made accessible over the exisiting garage door by 2 x small swing doors/shiplap made out of the left overs.

If you are going to tile, you can replace the ply with lengths of 1" x 1/2" nailed on the triangle's longest length (would be cheaper too)

We can now store ladders, bit and pieces, lengths of wood etc Pictures can be made available. PM me.
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