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How much does a dehumidifier cost to run per 24 hours?
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# 1
Richy25
Old 02-02-2009, 2:36 PM
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Default How much does a dehumidifier cost to run per 24 hours?

HI all, wonder if anyone can help me work this. Our landlord has givin us a B and Q dehumidifier to soak up damp in our flaT.

http://www.diy.com/diy/jsp/bq/nav/nav.jsp?action=detail&fh_secondid=9446440&fh_view_ size=6&fh_start_index=6&fh_eds=%3F&fh_location=%2F %2Fcatal!!!1%2Fen_GB%2Fcategories%3C{10096}%2Fcate gories%3C{10098}%2Fsystem_basicsOnlineOnly%3E{1}&f h_refview=lister&ts=1227446555241&isSearch=false

THISIS THE MODEL;

Heres the spec of it;

Rated voltage -220-240V
Rated frequency - 50Hz
Rated power - 220W
Moisture removal -10 L/D @ 30*C 80% RH

Im on british gas duel fuel (just changed).

heres the price Im on.

Standard Electricity for;

Meter Type: Single Rate Credit

Payment Method: Quarterly Cash/Cheque

Tier 1 Tier 2 26.909p
per kWh

11.804p
per kWh

(inc.VAT)


does anyone know how to work out the cost for 24 hour period on this information.
Any help gratefully appriciated.
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# 2
Magentasue
Old 02-02-2009, 2:41 PM
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We have this one: http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Produc...3EDELONGHI.htm

I reckon it averages 4kwh over 24 hours. It's rated 190watts. I run it for 4-6 hours a day now, mainly because we have a bathroom at the back of the kitchen prone to damp. Has done a brilliant job. Well worth 50p a day when we first got it.
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# 3
Premier
Old 02-02-2009, 3:18 PM
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The unit is rated at 220W. This is the maximum power draw and so would cost about 2p per hour at tier2 level.

BUT...it works like a fridge. i.e. it does not draw maximum power continuously as the compressor cuts in and out. Therefore it will cost substantially less than 50p per day at tier2 rates.

Your only way to know how much it is actually costing you is to plug it into a power monitor (currently on offer @ 9.99 @ maplin)
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# 4
Magentasue
Old 02-02-2009, 3:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Premier View Post
Therefore it will cost substantially less than 50p per day at tier2 rates.
Yes, that's true. However, I factor the standing charge into my electricity costs so that I reckon a kwh costs me about 12.5p even though my tier 2 cost is less than that. I did plug mine into a monitor when I first got it, and it averaged 4kwh a day. That was running constantly - we put it on early evening and turn it off at bedtime now.
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# 5
Richy25
Old 02-02-2009, 5:33 PM
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thanks for the advice, I might get one of those power readers from maplin, to check.

so so appor 12 a month on 24 hours
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# 6
Magentasue
Old 02-02-2009, 5:41 PM
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We ran ours constantly for three weeks and then cut down to evenings only. We did this because the bathroom windows were no longer running with condensation so figured we could ease up. We'd had three bedrooms plastered and that was drying out plus the offending bathroom. There are six of us having a bath in the evening so that's when we run ours. I put it on at about 6pm when I start cooking and leave it running until bedtime, so usually about six hours and that works well for us.
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# 7
KimYeovil
Old 02-02-2009, 5:56 PM
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Magenta, unless you have no television, no toaster, no kettle, no fridge, no electric shower, no lighting, no washing machine, no children, no computers, etc you should not include the standing charge (whether daily or two tier) in your considerations. That should be separated out as a monthly or quarterly flat rate cost. You should use the tier 2 price.

Richy, don't forget the effectiveness of opening windows and doors for a couple of hours - even when it's cold and wet, the drying effect will be better (and subjectively it always feels less cold) than a locked-up clammy insulated shell.
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# 8
Magentasue
Old 02-02-2009, 6:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KimYeovil View Post
Magenta, unless you have no television, no toaster, no kettle, no fridge, no electric shower, no lighting, no washing machine, no children, no computers, etc you should not include the standing charge (whether daily or two tier) in your considerations. That should be separated out as a monthly or quarterly flat rate cost. You should use the tier 2 price.

Richy, don't forget the effectiveness of opening windows and doors for a couple of hours - even when it's cold and wet, the drying effect will be better (and subjectively it always feels less cold) than a locked-up clammy insulated shell.
I suppose so, but I like a price per unit that takes the standing charge into account as, since I have to pay it, I see it as part of the running cost of everything rather than just the everyday things. As for opening windows, that works in the rest of the house but not the bathroom. Bathroom is probably a misnomer as it's a converted outhouse tacked on to the back of the house. Opening the windows was enough until winter kicked in and then I couldn't wipe the walls and windows often enough to keep the mould at bay.
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# 9
Ken68
Old 02-02-2009, 6:10 PM
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I ventilate the bathroom a couple of hours a day, then a couple of hours de-humid in the evening when everything is locked down for the night.
Helping also are exterior window shutters made from polystyrene, guaranteed no condensation on the inside of the windows in the morning.
A builder friend has told me that over an extended period of use the demidifier will draw water from the toilet and 'S' bends of the bath and sink, so lid down and plugs in.
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# 10
bockster
Old 02-02-2009, 6:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken68 View Post
I ventilate the bathroom a couple of hours a day, then a couple of hours de-humid in the evening when everything is locked down for the night.
Helping also are exterior window shutters made from polystyrene, guaranteed no condensation on the inside of the windows in the morning.
A builder friend has told me that over an extended period of use the demidifier will draw water from the toilet and 'S' bends of the bath and sink, so lid down and plugs in.

any traps will refill as soon as you next flush, drain sink, etc.
me thinks you have to go quite some time without washing/bathing for this to happen in the first place
Please note, we've had to remove your signature because it was sh*te!
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# 11
Ken68
Old 03-02-2009, 6:35 AM
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Thought this was interesting...

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/09/re...te/09home.html
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# 12
Cardew
Old 03-02-2009, 9:29 AM
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Condensation on the windows is just a symptom. Preventing it forming on the widows by using polystyrene shutters does not cure the problem(if indeed a problem exists)

In the same way a heated rear window on a car does not dry out the inside of a car.
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# 13
Ken68
Old 03-02-2009, 11:07 AM
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Condensation on the inside of windows is caused by the temperature difference between interior and exterior. Reduce that difference by placing 50mm into the window reveal on the outside of the house does the job.It doesn't work if you put the polystyrene on the inside. And fire or smoke risk anyway.
Easily made (20 for 4 windows) and handled.
Proof of the pudding is in this house. NO CONDENSATION on the inside of the windows with exterior shutters and condensation otherwise.
And further proof is my bills..a saving of 60 a year.
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# 14
Ken68
Old 03-02-2009, 11:13 AM
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This is the material...

http://www.wickes.co.uk/Polystyrene-...ne/invt/210802
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# 15
Premier
Old 03-02-2009, 11:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken68 View Post
Condensation on the inside of windows is caused by the temperature difference between interior and exterior.
Not quite. Warmer air can, but doesn't necessarily, carry more moisture than cold air. It's when that air with higher moisture content meets a colder surface, any higher mositure content condenses out.

If the interior window surface is the same temperature as the interior air, then condensation will not form on the windows ... but the warmer heavier water laden air still exists inside the property so water will condense if it hits a cooler surface, e.g. an exterior wall, perhaps behind a wardrobe etc.

The solution to a condensation problem is to remove the increased moisture content of the air inside the property, either by ventilation, the use of a dehumidifier or best of all, don't allow the air to become so water laden in the first instance.
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# 16
Ken68
Old 03-02-2009, 11:54 AM
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That is what I said, Premier, increase the window pane temperature to match the inside of the house temperature.
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# 17
Cardew
Old 03-02-2009, 11:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken68 View Post
Condensation on the inside of windows is caused by the temperature difference between interior and exterior. Reduce that difference by placing 50mm into the window reveal on the outside of the house does the job.It doesn't work if you put the polystyrene on the inside. And fire or smoke risk anyway.
Easily made (20 for 4 windows) and handled.
Proof of the pudding is in this house. NO CONDENSATION on the inside of the windows with exterior shutters and condensation otherwise.
And further proof is my bills..a saving of 60 a year.

Ken,
We are at cross-purposes.

It is not in dispute that you can prevent condensation forming on the windows. - as said above, a heated rear widow on a car does that as well. However condensation on a window is just a symptom that demonstrates there is humidity.

The purpose of a dehumidifier is to remove the high humidity(dampness) that is in the house. That dampness is in the fabric of the house and furniture etc.

Preventing condensation forming on a window does nothing to remove that dampness.

In fact high humidity is a bigger problem abroad in hot humid climates where no condensation ever forms on the inside of widows and it is necessary to take measures to reduce humidity.

With respect you have no 'proof' that you have saved 60 by putting anything on your windows. Double glazing, triple glazing or even bricking up the window might save a small amount of heat loss. However it will have done nothing to have solved the problem of a damp house.

You have to remove that moisture/dampness, or take measures to prevent the dampness.
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# 18
Ken68
Old 03-02-2009, 12:22 PM
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Yes see your point Premier/Cardew tis a different topic.
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# 19
DocBrown
Old 03-02-2009, 1:11 PM
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I think you have to multiply the rating of the device in watts by number of hours used to get KW/h figure i.e 220 watts X 24 hours = 5,280 watts. Divide by 1000 to get Kilowatt/hour figure = 5.28 which is in Units. Multiply units by your electric kWh price - say 11 pence. Total 5.28 X 11 = 58pence per 24 hours or 211.70 per year.
Hope this helps. I've just carried out a rough energy audit on my house and we're using between 6 to 8 units per day.
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# 20
Ken68
Old 03-02-2009, 1:23 PM
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The default on my de-humidifer is set at 60, is this normal, is there an average setting?
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