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  • FIRST POST
    megasaver
    Breadmaking - recipes, hints, tips, questions
    • #1
    • 23rd Apr 05, 5:46 PM
    Breadmaking - recipes, hints, tips, questions 23rd Apr 05 at 5:46 PM
    Not sure how to go about this. But would it be possible to start a thread/ recipe index for all us "breadmaker" afficonados (sp) - and there seems to be quite a few of us .

    It just struck me that a lot of us through trial and error have come up with some fantastic breadmaker recipes and tips that would be great to share with others on this site. It would def save others time, energy and money!

    Judi and Squeaky could you please advise if this would be a good idea and how to go about it?

    For example my first tip is whenever I boil potatoes I keep the water and use that for my breadmaking - the starch in the water is very good for making bread!

    Megaxx
    Last edited by megasaver; 23-04-2005 at 7:37 PM.
Page 13
  • tattooed_lady
    Thank you very much for your quick reply Squeaky, really appreciate it. Will try our recipe tomorrow!
  • taplady
    I have just bought my first breadmaker on Ebay and am very excited waiting for it to arrive! thanks for all the tips ! I cant wait toproduce my first loaf!!!!
    Every penny saved is a penny saved
  • Allexie
    I've just acquired a new, (to me ), breadmaker today


    Its a Morphy Richards 48220 and it's a beast! I had no idea they were so big! Fortunately the manual was with it and also a cup-size measuring thingy but I think there should also be another measuring thingy (tsp?). Can anyone tell me...is this just a standard tsp measure or is it a 'special' one?

    Also, (really blonde questions coming up cos I'm a bit intimidated by the manual!), is it right that you just chuck all the ingredients in the pan? And then what...do you have to mix them at all yourself? And when you use the timer thingy is the water/flour/yeast etc happy to just sit there for hours til things start to happen. The manual says something about keeping the yeast away from the liquid...but how on earth do you manage to do that?

    I can see a steep learning curve ahead....good grief, becoming a breadmaker-owner is a bit like entering a parallel universe!!
    ♥♥♥ Genius - 1% inspiration and 99% doing what your mother told you. ♥♥♥

    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 5th Sep 05, 8:04 PM
    • 13,812 Posts
    • 15,845 Thanks
    squeaky
    I've just acquired a new, (to me ), breadmaker today

    Its a Morphy Richards 48220 and it's a beast! I had no idea they were so big! Fortunately the manual was with it and also a cup-size measuring thingy but I think there should also be another measuring thingy (tsp?). Can anyone tell me...is this just a standard tsp measure or is it a 'special' one?

    I'd bet on it being a standard (5ml) teaspoon measure.
    by Allexie

    Also, (really blonde questions coming up cos I'm a bit intimidated by the manual!), is it right that you just chuck all the ingredients in the pan? And then what...do you have to mix them at all yourself? And when you use the timer thingy is the water/flour/yeast etc happy to just sit there for hours til things start to happen. The manual says something about keeping the yeast away from the liquid...but how on earth do you manage to do that?

    I can see a steep learning curve ahead....good grief, becoming a breadmaker-owner is a bit like entering a parallel universe!!
    Yes just chuck everything in and then turn it on

    Using the timer... usually you are asked to keep the yeast and the salt separate because the salt kills off the yeast...

    ..anyway - some machines are liquids first and others are flour first.

    For liquids first - add your layer of flour on top of the water and sit the yeast and the salt in different places on the flour (not forgetting any other ingredients, of course )

    For flour first - then you'd best put your yeast in quite early.
    Last edited by squeaky; 05-09-2005 at 8:07 PM.
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
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  • Allexie
    Yes just chuck everything in and then turn it on

    Using the timer... usually you are asked to keep the yeast and the salt separate because the salt kills off the yeast...

    ..anyway - some machines are liquids first and others are flour first.

    For liquids first - add your layer of flour on top of the water and sit the yeast and the salt in different places on the flour (not forgetting any other ingredients, of course )

    For flour first - then you'd best put your yeast in quite early.
    by squeaky
    Thanks squeaks! Why couldn't the manual 'splain it like that :confused:
    ♥♥♥ Genius - 1% inspiration and 99% doing what your mother told you. ♥♥♥

    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 5th Sep 05, 8:21 PM
    • 13,812 Posts
    • 15,845 Thanks
    squeaky
    Dunno miss. I've spent my life (it feels like) explaining manuals. Maybe I should have got a job as a technical writer
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = £5.20 Apr £0.50
  • heather+tom
    I've just acquired a new, (to me ), breadmaker today

    by Allexie
    Buy yourself the VITAL Breadmix .. from LIDL ... makes 2 breads ...
    ALL is in ...
    Works every time ...
    costs 89 pence per Kg (hence 2 breads!)

    &…is even VERY healthy .. (looking @ the ingredients )


    People will believe 'YOU are in the KNOW' ... / tastes and looks so GOOD
    (or the mother/father of 'Jamie'..or some other fine dining geek ...)

    Good luck ...

    (P.S:this is our 15 year home breadmaker experience .. )

    Open recipes work ... sometimes ...

    The LIDL one ... is for the 'journal of reproducible results'
  • Ruby Pudding
    Quick question - I always sift my bread before adding it to the breadmaker but is this really neccessary do you think?
  • tom and barbara good
    Would having the kitchen door open a little (to the outside that is) have any effect on the bread baking correctly (ANOTHER sunken loaf!)
    If I screw my eyes up tight I can just about see where you're coming from
    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 6th Sep 05, 11:48 AM
    • 13,812 Posts
    • 15,845 Thanks
    squeaky
    Ruby - I've never sifted flour.

    Tom - ambient temperatures can make a difference to bread, so a draught from a door (if the breadmaker is in line) might possibly do that.

    Otherwise you could do what I do with mine which is ignore the programs!

    I set it to make dough. Then I set the kitchen timer for two hours and take a look at how much the bread has risen. If it needs to rise longer I set the timer to quarter hour intervals until the bread is high enough. Then I set the machine to bake. A bit of a pain but you get to know the minimum time a loaf needs and adjust your own timings accordingly.

    Sometimes a loaf is WELL up in two hours, yet the next, from the same packet of yeast sachets, will take considerably longer. The only way I've found to beat these variations is to use the technique outlined above.
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = £5.20 Apr £0.50
  • tom and barbara good
    Thanks, but it is rising well, then it sinks as it bakes - I'm beginning to get very disilliusioned with it!
    If I screw my eyes up tight I can just about see where you're coming from
  • Allexie
    Buy yourself the VITAL Breadmix .. from LIDL ... makes 2 breads ...
    ALL is in ...
    Works every time ...
    costs 89 pence per Kg (hence 2 breads!)

    &…is even VERY healthy .. (looking @ the ingredients )


    People will believe 'YOU are in the KNOW' ... / tastes and looks so GOOD
    (or the mother/father of 'Jamie'..or some other fine dining geek ...)

    Good luck ...

    (P.S:this is our 15 year home breadmaker experience .. )

    Open recipes work ... sometimes ...

    The LIDL one ... is for the 'journal of reproducible results'
    by heather+tom
    Oh rats!! Got a Netto and an Aldi and every other supermarket known to man/woman on me doorstep....but not a Lidl!!!
    ♥♥♥ Genius - 1% inspiration and 99% doing what your mother told you. ♥♥♥

    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 6th Sep 05, 12:23 PM
    • 13,812 Posts
    • 15,845 Thanks
    squeaky
    Thanks, but it is rising well, then it sinks as it bakes - I'm beginning to get very disilliusioned with it!
    by tom and barbara good
    Oh. Right.

    The troubleshooting bit in my hand book says this is because the dough was not strong enough.

    The main one here is too much water and not enough flour. (Maybe try reducing water by 20mil per loaf per time until the dough stays up?)

    They also say in my book that you should use proper bread flour. I know some of us do very well with ordinary plain flour but until you get this sorted it's best to stay with the book recipe.

    Have you checked your scales? It's possible you have the wrong flour weight. Find an unopened pack of rice or pasta or flour and check its weight on your scales. The packaging for those shouldn't weight more than a few (ten?) grams so if your result is off by more than this the scales are wrong.
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = £5.20 Apr £0.50
  • tom and barbara good
    Thanks again - I'm going to have one more go this evening with the door closed and all the suggested points carried out.
    If I screw my eyes up tight I can just about see where you're coming from
  • larmy16
    Thanks again - I'm going to have one more go this evening with the door closed and all the suggested points carried out.
    by tom and barbara good
    Tom and Barbara,

    I had the MR breadmaker you have, and I had the same problem with the bread rising, then collapsing in the centre. Despite all the tricks, I never did resolve the problem. I do think I had a dodgy machine too though, as all my loaves came out dark crusted, even if I chose the light setting. The loaves were on the heavy side.

    Any deviation from the exact measurements resulted in a disaster, as did trying recipes off the back of bread flour packets.

    In the end I bought the Panasonic and gave the MR to a neighbour.
  • Fluffy Bunny
    Morphy Richards Fastbake (48280)
    I have had varying success with my BM. The recipes in the book seem to require far too much sugar - 3 tablespoons for the 2lb loaf. And the bread does come out v. sweet. says to use oil which does give a silky loaf if you like that sort of texture - more like a madiera cake.
    I rang up Morphy Richards who assured me recipe required the exact measurements. Most recipes I've seen have 1-3 teaspoons of sugar. They insisted not an error on their part.

    Also as it is a fastbake, was looking forward to quick loaves as I've greedy gannets in my house but if using fastbake (1 hour) I get bricks.

    Any suggestions. :confused:
  • tom and barbara good
    The machine can stay, it was touch and go for a while! we have had success by totally ignoring the recipes in the manual and using the recipe I would have followed if I'd been using my trusty old Kenwood Chef (this is the recipe from the back of the strong flour packets this means that the sugar is optional and no oil, just a little soft butter or if you are really old fashioned and for the traditional taste, lard)

    I made a white loaf last night and a brown one today, both stayed risen and didn't collapse whilst baking AND I took the paddle thingy out as soon as the kneading was over so that I didn't have to wrench the bread from the tin and leave a big chunk of it behind, now there is just a little hole where the spindle was.
    If I screw my eyes up tight I can just about see where you're coming from
    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 7th Sep 05, 5:36 PM
    • 13,812 Posts
    • 15,845 Thanks
    squeaky
    How much different in terms of water and flour were the recipes?

    I saw yesterday while looking up troubleshooting for you that they reckoned a collapse was due to too much water v flour. Since my loaves all drop by about an inch (2cm) I put 20mil less water in the mix and the loaf dropped MORE! So much for that idea and back to my old recipe

    Glad to know you have good loaves now
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = £5.20 Apr £0.50
  • tom and barbara good
    The Hovis strong flour pack has the traditional bread recipe that I have used for years and years, the only difference being that these day the yeast has changed from the 'real' yeast to the fast action. Back to basics saved the day

    1 lb 2 ounces flour
    1 oz butter (lard is nicer)
    1 1/2 teasp salt
    1 1/4 teasp fast action yeast
    12 fl oz water
    optional 2 teasp sugar

    The brown version was the same mixture, I just tinkered around with the proportions of wholemeal, white and granary flour, it was a mixture.
    If I screw my eyes up tight I can just about see where you're coming from
    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 7th Sep 05, 7:35 PM
    • 13,812 Posts
    • 15,845 Thanks
    squeaky
    That's a higher water to flour ratio than any of the mixes shown in my book.

    Flour 1 lb 2 oz = 450g
    Water 12 oz = 336g

    in your recipe, versus

    Flour 460g
    Water 260g

    ..in mine

    Almost the same amount of flour but very different amounts of water. Hmm...
    Last edited by squeaky; 07-09-2005 at 7:38 PM.
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = £5.20 Apr £0.50
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