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  • moneysavingplumber
    • #2
    • 12th Oct 05, 12:03 AM
    • #2
    • 12th Oct 05, 12:03 AM
    It's probably possible but it depends on the location of the room and the type of soil connection you have, and the relative position to that of the proposed site of the toilet. If it's a ground floor room with a soil connection in the floor, it may be more awkward because of the lack of play to get a reasonable fall. Upstairs will likely be easier, soil pipes can be run inside or out, but should take the shortest route with the fewest bends possible. You should really only have one 110mm bend between the pan and the branch connection to the soil stack, if adding anymore then make sure it's an 'access' elbow (i.e. incorporating a rodding eye) and it is accessible.
  • moose
    • #3
    • 12th Oct 05, 7:05 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Oct 05, 7:05 PM
    Thanks for that, I have also had another thought...we currently have drainage at the rear of the house for kitchen sink/washing machine. What kind of costs would you estimate to put a new soil pipe in at the rear of the house.

    Thanks

    Moose
  • Ted_Hutchinson
    • #4
    • 12th Oct 05, 7:17 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Oct 05, 7:17 PM
    Welcome to www.saniflow.co.uk Cheap saniflow
    There are sometime situations where it would be cheaper to pump the effluent through a smaller pipe under the floorboards than rerouting or adding another full size wast pipe so it's worth investigating these pumped toilets.
    • Debt_Free_Chick
    • By Debt_Free_Chick 12th Oct 05, 7:36 PM
    • 13,152 Posts
    • 9,492 Thanks
    Debt_Free_Chick
    • #5
    • 12th Oct 05, 7:36 PM
    • #5
    • 12th Oct 05, 7:36 PM
    Is this subject to Building Control regulations? I thought it might be as it relates to disposal of sewage, which one imagines would be a key priority for building control.

    If you were siting the internal soil pipe so that it merely connected to the existing external pipe, I would be more relaxed.

    However, resiting the entire soil pipe in the way you describe, leads me to suggest that you should consider consulting the Building Control Officer at your local authority. There are certainly specific provisions for the provision of soil/waste disposal for new properties ... and for extensions. OK, you are not "building" but you seem to be re-siting the original pipe that was previously approved under the building regs.

    What do others think?
    • Debt_Free_Chick
    • By Debt_Free_Chick 12th Oct 05, 7:51 PM
    • 13,152 Posts
    • 9,492 Thanks
    Debt_Free_Chick
    • #6
    • 12th Oct 05, 7:51 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Oct 05, 7:51 PM
    The information offered by different local authorities varies, but according the Devon Council website here, you will need to comply with the Building Regulations.

    I'm no expert (as you will have noticed ), but I would expect the regulations to prescribe the minimum you must do. this seems to cover it, but a call to your local building control officer might get the "plain English version"
  • moneysavingplumber
    • #7
    • 12th Oct 05, 10:55 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Oct 05, 10:55 PM
    Moose isn't resiting the entire soil pipe or making any underground alterations. Connecting to an existing soil point in a downstairs WC or simply altering a branched section does not require building control involvement. The installation should comply with the regulations but that does not mean they will have to inspect it. Common sense applies, correct materials, correct fall and accessed elbows where they are necessary will suffice.
  • moneysavingplumber
    • #8
    • 12th Oct 05, 11:00 PM
    • #8
    • 12th Oct 05, 11:00 PM
    Apologies, I just spotted Moose's later post regarding a new soil pipe.

    New soil pipes are expensive. It depends on the drainage you have there. If you only have a gully joining the nearest manhole, any junction cut into that will need another manhole cut in, so a fair bit of groundwork. The combination of the groundwork and a new stack are not likely to cost much less than 1k. Saniflo is always an option, but they are noisy and horrible when they go wrong. Your original suggestion doesn't sound so bad, but it depends on the distances involved.
    • Debt_Free_Chick
    • By Debt_Free_Chick 12th Oct 05, 11:38 PM
    • 13,152 Posts
    • 9,492 Thanks
    Debt_Free_Chick
    • #9
    • 12th Oct 05, 11:38 PM
    • #9
    • 12th Oct 05, 11:38 PM
    I'm not clear either .. the first post mentions resiting the waste (soil?) pipe from a side external wall to a rear external wall. That sounds like it might be a complete re-routing of the soil pipe from its present site/flow to a new site/flow ... is it?

    The second post mentions installing a new soil pipe at the rear of the house.

    Soil, as I understand it, relates to the loo. Waste is dirty water only.

    A call to the local Buildings Regs Officer must be the only way to go .... :confused: ?
  • moneysavingplumber
    I'm not clear either .. the first post mentions resiting the waste (soil?) pipe from a side external wall to a rear external wall. That sounds like it might be a complete re-routing of the soil pipe from its present site/flow to a new site/flow ... is it?
    by Debt_Free_Chick
    I took this to mean simply extending the branched run around a corner.
  • moose
    Sorry, caused a bit of confusion I think. As you can tell I am no plumber.

    Just to clear things up...it seems that putting a new soil pipe at the rear is a major task. I have now discounted this. Also, Saniflow sounds like it is not ideal. I have discounted this as well.

    If we do go ahead with the bathroom reorganise then I guess I will be investigating the possiblity of routing the toilet waste to the current soil pipe.

    This would involve running the waste from the toilet along the rear wall of the property (about 1.2m to the corner) and then along the side of the property to the existing soil pipe (about 1.5m from the corner).

    Does this sound feasible? Would it be best to route this internally or externally?

    Many thanks for everyones comments

    Moose.

    PS. This has all come about because our new house has a corner bath which both me and Mrs Moose are unhappy about. We desperately need a standard bath and it looks like the only way is to move the loo.
  • moneysavingplumber
    Internally would be preferable because you can connect with a bent pan connector, then take it through the wall at the corner and use a 110mm bend towards the branch at the stack, effectively only using one soil bend. The only drawback is having to box it in.
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