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  • FIRST POST
    Rachelle
    Save Zillions On Cleaning Products
    • #1
    • 27th Sep 03, 4:52 AM
    Save Zillions On Cleaning Products 27th Sep 03 at 4:52 AM
    Official MSE Insert:

    Thanks to Rachelle for starting this legendary thread, which includes everything from cleaning your loo with cola to washing clothes with white vinegar.
    Scroll down for tons more tips.

    If you haven’t already,
    join the forum. If you aren’t sure how it all works, read our New to Forum? Intro Guide.


    Back to the original post...

    Forget about buying all those expensive cleaners they keep advertising on the telly ---- there are LOTS of ways to achieve the same results for relatively little outlay of cash.

    For instance, I have been using white vinegar for all sorts of things, from room deodoriser to laundry conditioner. And believe me, the stuff really works! (The vinegar smell evaporates after 5-10 minutes)

    To give you some examples:

    Laundry Products

    White Vinegar. Eliminate soap residue by adding 1 cup of white vinegar to the washer's final rinse. Vinegar is
    too mild to harm fabrics but strong enough to dissolve
    alkalies in soaps and detergents. Vinegar also breaks down uric acid, so adding 1 cup vinegar to the rinse water is especially good for babies' clothes.

    To get wool and cotton blankets soft and fluffy as new, add 2 cups white vinegar to a full tub of rinsewater. DO NOT USE VINEGAR IF YOU ADD CHLORINE BLEACH TO YOUR RINSEWATER. IT WILL PRODUCE HARMFUL VAPORS.

    Baking Soda. 1/4 to 1/2 cup baking soda per wash load
    makes clothes feel soft and smell fresh.

    Baking Soda. You can cut the amount of chlorine bleach
    used in your wash by half when you add 1/2 cup baking soda to top loading machines or 1/4 cup to front loaders.

    Vinegar. To remove smoky odor from clothes, fill your
    bathtub with hot water. Add 1 cup white vinegar. Hang
    garments above the steaming bath water.

    Cornstarch. For homemade laundry starch, dissolve 1
    tablespoon cornstarch in 1 pint cold water. Place in a
    spray bottle. Shake before using. Clearly label the
    contents of the spray bottle.

    Lime And Mineral Deposit Remover

    Vinegar and Paper Towels. Hard lime deposits around
    faucets can be softened for easy removal by covering the deposits with vinegar-soaked paper towels. Leave the paper towels on for about one hour before cleaning. Leaves chrome clean and shiny.

    For Plastic and Metal Showerheads: Vinegar. To remove
    deposits which may be clogging your metal shower head, combine 1/2 cup white vinegar and one quart water. Then completely submerge the showerhead and boil 15 minutes. If you have a plastic showerhead, combine 1 pint white vinegar and 1 pint hot water. Then completely submerge the showerhead and soak for about one hour.

    ***********
    Anyway, as I said earlier, I am quite happy with the results and it has certainly saved this household ££££!

    (Bet this is where the "How Clean is Your House" gang get their tips.)

    This Forum Tip was included in MoneySavingExpert's weekly email

    Don't miss out on new deals, loopholes, and vouchers

    Last edited by MSE Megan F; 08-03-2016 at 11:19 AM.
Page 29
    • supersaver1000
    • By supersaver1000 26th Oct 14, 6:19 PM
    • 1,926 Posts
    • 12,036 Thanks
    supersaver1000
    I agree with the coke, but I also used the toilet brush and some ajax power on ours. I then had to get the rubber gloves out and a scourer to really finish it off.

    Ours is the same - a new toilet - the old one was much better quality I think, but we are on spring water too, so maybe there is a connection.

    Have you thought about a bloo loo tablet - would that work?

    Good Luck with a yukky job!
    New Job - Degree started - get rid of big OD - Loans Repaid by 2020 - Debt and CC-free by Jun'21
    Consumerism is.... buying things you don't need with money you don't have to impress people you don't know and probably wouldn't like even if you did know them.
    It's not getting what you want, it's wanting what you've got
    • kboss2010
    • By kboss2010 26th Oct 14, 7:53 PM
    • 973 Posts
    • 5,977 Thanks
    kboss2010
    Broomstick - was that from drypak? I have looked on their site with a great deal of interest, but I won't be buying anything more until I absolutely have to!

    MrsGSR - I tried making laundry gloop but I got a funny smell in the washing. It wasn't in the gloop, and it persisted even when I added tea tree oil. I don't think it was even the washing machine as the laundry was fine with normal powder. I got some Ariel professional at Makro, working out at 170 of their washes for, I think, £18 but I can't remember clearly. When that runs out I plan to try Aldi powder as it is supposed to be very good indeed. I have run out of Vanish and I am already doing a boost for whites with washing soda.

    How do we stand on brillo pads? I don't seem to need them, but that could be because I haven't tackled my oven.
    Originally posted by wannabe sybil
    Aldi washing powder and liquid is great!

    I use the lavender scented bio powder for my clothes (it's cheaper than the gel) and non-bio gel for OH's because he has very sensitive skin. The gel is around £2.99 a bottle and the powder is slightly cheaper (I think around £2.20?) but if you live in a soft water area you can get away with using half a capful of gel instead of a full one per load. I also use the gel bottle lids to measure out my washing powder, an almost-full cap will do a washer load.

    I've never lived in a hard water area so I can't say if they're the same or not.

    I've cleaned my oven once in the last 3 years. It's way past its sell-by date but belongs to a rented flat so I can't replace it. I used that really nasty oven cleaner liquid that comes in an orange bottle and it worked really well.

    My OH uses scourers every so often otherwise I wouldn't bother buying them. Never buy Brillo, just the cheap round ones from £1 shops and add my own soap.

    I've got some blocks of green Fairy clothes washing bars from what looks like 1960 (inherited from an elderly relative) and I haven't a clue what to do with them! I'm concerned about using them to wash dishes as I don't know what they're made from and they look old enough to possibly be from an era when no one knew that asbestos was toxic.

    Does anyone older than me remember them and, if so, what can I do with them besides hand washing clothes?

    Edit: So, uh, I googled it and apparently I can fleabay 2 bars of the stuff for around £12?! Why do people want this stuff?
    Last edited by kboss2010; 26-10-2014 at 8:07 PM.
    "I want to be a glow worm, A glow worm's never glum
    'Coz how can you be grumpy, when the sun shines out your bum?" ~ Dr A. Tapping


    I'm finding my way back to sanity again... but I don't really know what I'm gonna do when I get there
    ~ Lifehouse
    • mositt
    • By mositt 9th Mar 16, 5:55 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    mositt
    As well as vinegar ...
    Thanks for all the brill tips! I agree that vinegar is the wonder liquid, use it all the time, (got 10% proof off the internet and since it is stronger than store bought ones I can use less) Coke is great too, I use it to clean my stainless steel sink. My favourite cleaner is in-wash cleaning crystals - Vanish if on offer or cheapie ones - great for cleaning items with hard to reach nooks & crannies eg metal sieves, fork tines, and any utensil that is washable, incl stained cups etc. I put a scoop in a big bowl, add really hot water then steep items for a while and hey presto! If you have time you can amuse yourself by watching the grime float to the surface! M
    • givememoney
    • By givememoney 10th Mar 16, 3:21 PM
    • 923 Posts
    • 1,181 Thanks
    givememoney
    Stains
    For stains I find damping them then rubbing them with green bar soap, then letting it dry in before putting in the machine can often get out stubborn stains or even ones that have been through the wash.
    • Cambrinus
    • By Cambrinus 11th Mar 16, 6:05 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    Cambrinus
    Fishy fridge
    A fishy smell means that gas has escaped; no cheap repair possible.
    • Treasurequeen
    • By Treasurequeen 24th Mar 16, 9:46 PM
    • 169 Posts
    • 1,727 Thanks
    Treasurequeen
    I make up a mold spray using vinegar and tea tree oil, it works wonders and is cheap to make. You just need a good spray bottle, vinegar, distilled water and a few drops of tea tree oils. Much cheaper than the mold sprays stocked at the supermarket and online and there is no nasty chemicals in it.
    • Boodedoo
    • By Boodedoo 21st Sep 16, 8:08 PM
    • 135 Posts
    • 417 Thanks
    Boodedoo
    Hoping someone can advise.
    Have recently bought (but not yet moved into) a flat as we are downsizing.

    Its lovely, the lady who was the previous owner proudly told me she 'cooked a lot', Good for her!
    Now that we have the keys, I have poked around the kitchen a bit more effectively. She must have been so busy cooking that cleaning took a back seat :-)

    I took out (with difficulty) one of the two metal (?? aluminium ??) metal filters in the cooker hood. They are almost solid grease :-(
    They are dishwasher safe but really are SO clogged I think I'd need to try to eat through the layers of grease before the dishwasher could do anything significant.


    ( I did look at just binning them and buying new but its at least 10 years old and the cost of replacement metal filters makes a new cooker hood look more cost effective, given its age - though I'd rather not spend the extra at the mo)
    If anyone has any suggestions that will help cut through the grease I'd be happy to know about them.

    Thanks
    • suki1964
    • By suki1964 21st Sep 16, 11:47 PM
    • 9,028 Posts
    • 19,565 Thanks
    suki1964
    For the fans in work we have to be harsh

    Caustic soda bath over night, the a good blast out with a pressure washer


    Do use gloves and very old clothes and leave them to soak outside. Any large plastic container will work


    Not envoiremently friendly but saves time and effort
    if you lend someone £20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it
    • Boodedoo
    • By Boodedoo 22nd Sep 16, 7:26 AM
    • 135 Posts
    • 417 Thanks
    Boodedoo
    For the fans in work we have to be harsh

    Caustic soda bath over night, the a good blast out with a pressure washer


    Do use gloves and very old clothes and leave them to soak outside. Any large plastic container will work


    Not envoiremently friendly but saves time and effort
    Originally posted by suki1964
    Thanks, sounds a bit aggressive but will have a word with my eldest daughter who is a chemist - I'm not too keen on using something like caustic soda at home !
    • suki1964
    • By suki1964 22nd Sep 16, 7:37 AM
    • 9,028 Posts
    • 19,565 Thanks
    suki1964
    Caustic soda is fine to use as long as you follow the instructions
    if you lend someone £20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it
    • Gwendolyn
    • By Gwendolyn 22nd Sep 16, 10:23 AM
    • 49 Posts
    • 417 Thanks
    Gwendolyn
    Has anyone found anywhere good to buy a decent quantity of bicarbonate of soda. It works wonders on my bath but the small tubs are expensive for the purpose I'm using it for.
    I'm also going through a lot of white vinegar.
    I had a huge success recently - my children's plastic bath toys had scratched the bath with brown marks. No product I could find would get the marks out. But a bicarb scrub followed by vinegar lifted them off. Though I would advise caution. This is an old tub and I wasn't too worried if it were to go wrong and I were to stain it. And yes there was a nice little chemical reaction!
    • Slowly57
    • By Slowly57 22nd Sep 16, 3:31 PM
    • 70 Posts
    • 329 Thanks
    Slowly57
    I buy from the Astonish range - from 99p a go in our hardware shop - cruelty-free and all that good stuff and baby wipes clean most things lol
    getting my ducks in a row and my parachute ready Oct GC £65.43 / £200 28/9/16 - 26/10/16
    Saved nearly £100 each on car + home insurance 2016 by telling my insurer about better quotes elsewhere - feeling assertive - yay!
    • Anne_Marie
    • By Anne_Marie 22nd Sep 16, 6:07 PM
    • 1,888 Posts
    • 2,641 Thanks
    Anne_Marie

    I've got some blocks of green Fairy clothes washing bars from what looks like 1960 (inherited from an elderly relative) and I haven't a clue what to do with them! I'm concerned about using them to wash dishes as I don't know what they're made from and they look old enough to possibly be from an era when no one knew that asbestos was toxic.

    Does anyone older than me remember them and, if so, what can I do with them besides hand washing clothes?

    Edit: So, uh, I googled it and apparently I can fleabay 2 bars of the stuff for around £12?! Why do people want this stuff?
    Originally posted by kboss2010
    I vaguely remember my Mum using them on the collars of white school shirts, before popping in the washing machine. Other than that I have not a clue. I also remember her using a scrubbing board.
    • Slowly57
    • By Slowly57 22nd Sep 16, 10:42 PM
    • 70 Posts
    • 329 Thanks
    Slowly57
    Those magic eraser sponges are great!

    Sorry how random was that? Aimed at the person looking to clean a cooker splashback ...
    Last edited by Slowly57; 22-09-2016 at 10:45 PM. Reason: To make sense
    getting my ducks in a row and my parachute ready Oct GC £65.43 / £200 28/9/16 - 26/10/16
    Saved nearly £100 each on car + home insurance 2016 by telling my insurer about better quotes elsewhere - feeling assertive - yay!
    • cornishchick
    • By cornishchick 23rd Sep 16, 2:07 PM
    • 575 Posts
    • 5,677 Thanks
    cornishchick
    Hoping someone can advise.
    Have recently bought (but not yet moved into) a flat as we are downsizing.

    Its lovely, the lady who was the previous owner proudly told me she 'cooked a lot', Good for her!
    Now that we have the keys, I have poked around the kitchen a bit more effectively. She must have been so busy cooking that cleaning took a back seat :-)

    I took out (with difficulty) one of the two metal (?? aluminium ??) metal filters in the cooker hood. They are almost solid grease :-(
    They are dishwasher safe but really are SO clogged I think I'd need to try to eat through the layers of grease before the dishwasher could do anything significant.


    ( I did look at just binning them and buying new but its at least 10 years old and the cost of replacement metal filters makes a new cooker hood look more cost effective, given its age - though I'd rather not spend the extra at the mo)
    If anyone has any suggestions that will help cut through the grease I'd be happy to know about them.

    Thanks
    Originally posted by Boodedoo
    I have metal filters, I make up a spray bottle of white vinegar, ( left over from pickles ) few shakes of lemon juice, squirt of washing up liquid and topped up with warm water .. ( sorry no measurements) it's works brilliantly .. I spray and leave the filters in the sink. Then after a while( a few hours) I scrub them , then chuck in the dishwasher, if they need a second/ third go , do it.

    This is my default cleaner for everything except stainless steel lol
    live, love,laugh.
    living on my memories, my darling husband's soul flys on the wind.
    "Sealed Pot Challenge 5" #1841 now I have a sealed tin, anyone got a tin opener?
    C.R.A.P.R.O.L.L.Z #43 cornishchick - laughing first aider and coffee monitor.
    No debt now, but I'd rather have my husband back and live in a cardboard box.
    • imho
    • By imho 23rd Sep 16, 4:17 PM
    • 2,334 Posts
    • 1,538 Thanks
    imho
    Hoping someone can advise.
    Have recently bought (but not yet moved into) a flat as we are downsizing.

    Its lovely, the lady who was the previous owner proudly told me she 'cooked a lot', Good for her!
    Now that we have the keys, I have poked around the kitchen a bit more effectively. She must have been so busy cooking that cleaning took a back seat :-)

    I took out (with difficulty) one of the two metal (?? aluminium ??) metal filters in the cooker hood. They are almost solid grease :-(
    They are dishwasher safe but really are SO clogged I think I'd need to try to eat through the layers of grease before the dishwasher could do anything significant.


    ( I did look at just binning them and buying new but its at least 10 years old and the cost of replacement metal filters makes a new cooker hood look more cost effective, given its age - though I'd rather not spend the extra at the mo)
    If anyone has any suggestions that will help cut through the grease I'd be happy to know about them.

    Thanks
    Originally posted by Boodedoo
    Have you tried putting them in the bath with hot water and a few dishwashing tablets? Or you can use Bio washing powder or liquid and just leave to soak then finish off in dishwasher.
    • charlies-aunt
    • By charlies-aunt 23rd Sep 16, 8:40 PM
    • 1,525 Posts
    • 12,986 Thanks
    charlies-aunt
    Quick and effective degreaser.


    Try putting your metal filters in a dustbin bag - add a good cupful of neat ammonia, tie the neck of the bag tightly and leave in a warm sunny place for at least 4 or 5 hours.


    Open bag with care, remove filters and hose off with plain water - the grease will just rinse off - a quick going over with a cheapo 'Brillo-type' pad will remove any stubborn stains and have them looking like new
    The best things in life aren't things
    C.R.A.P.R.O.L.L.Z. Member #58 Duct-tape queen
    2016 is my year of personal change - 4st to lose! now 2st 1lb down with 1st 13lb to go
    Be a diamond in a rhinestone world


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