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  • FIRST POST
    • MaliyahSunset
    • By MaliyahSunset 11th Oct 17, 1:26 PM
    • 3Posts
    • 0Thanks
    MaliyahSunset
    Leaving job during probation period
    • #1
    • 11th Oct 17, 1:26 PM
    Leaving job during probation period 11th Oct 17 at 1:26 PM
    Hi Iím new here and was wondering if anyone could help.
    Iím 4 months in to my 6 month probabtionary period, but I want to leave.
    Iíve decided the job is too difficult for me.
    What would my notice period be?
    I want to go back to my previous job if I can, but in my area, jobs are few for someone who canít drive.
    What can I do please?
    Thanks
    Last edited by MaliyahSunset; 13-10-2017 at 5:39 PM.
Page 1
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 11th Oct 17, 1:35 PM
    • 1,212 Posts
    • 1,003 Thanks
    Comms69
    • #2
    • 11th Oct 17, 1:35 PM
    • #2
    • 11th Oct 17, 1:35 PM
    What does your contract say?


    Write a letter and present it. Life is uncomfortable, you will have to just deal with it
    • bargainbetty
    • By bargainbetty 11th Oct 17, 1:40 PM
    • 3,101 Posts
    • 7,142 Thanks
    bargainbetty
    • #3
    • 11th Oct 17, 1:40 PM
    • #3
    • 11th Oct 17, 1:40 PM
    Firstly, have you contacted your old employer about returning? You must establish if you have a job to go to there before anything.

    If you do have an offer to return, then check your contract for your notice period. If nothing is listed then you should be OK to offer statutory notice only (one week).

    If you do not have an offer to return, then focus your energy on finding a new role before you quit. You can acknowledge to potential new employers that you have moved recently, but have realised it was not the right role for you and want to find a permanent place somewhere.

    Personally, I wouldn't quit until you have somewhere to go. Once you have a new contract in your hand, hand in a letter stating you are giving one week's notice and write very little else. You may need a reference and other than 'It's turned out that it isn't right for me' you don't have to give any explanation whatever.

    Good luck
    Some days, it's just not worth chewing through the leather straps....
    LB moment - March 2006. DFD - 1 June 2012!!! DEBT FREE!
    MFW - Joined May 2012, aiming to cut the mortgage by an extra two months every year. (Overpaid £3000 so far)
    , only 11 years to go.

    • keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    • By keepcalmandstayoutofdebt 11th Oct 17, 9:10 PM
    • 2,932 Posts
    • 1,521 Thanks
    keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    • #4
    • 11th Oct 17, 9:10 PM
    • #4
    • 11th Oct 17, 9:10 PM
    I’ve decided the job is too difficult for me
    Also, I’m not looking forward to the conversation with my boss about my resignation, how can’t I best approach the matter with her? (She’s not very approachable, and a bit of a bully)
    I want to go back to my previous job if I can (which I didn’t love)
    Originally posted by MaliyahSunset
    Surely in the kindest sense if the job is to difficult, you're boss may already be slightly aware. That's the way to think.

    I always remember when I saw the boss on a Friday, before what I said next day, my background picture on the PC was of some rock climbing picture and the boss just went - is that you here?

    I said goodbye to this someone who swore every second word and featured as a (self confessed) bully - to be honest he refrained from this behaviour at this type of meeting. I don't regret facing it. Turned out he was worth his salt alright. Anyway made me promise I'd stay in the next job that bit longer and perhaps where I had gone wrong, it's stuck so I suppose something good came out of it. Sorry current company.

    What didn't you love about previous job? Try not to worry, things happen for a reason.
    Last edited by keepcalmandstayoutofdebt; 11-10-2017 at 9:11 PM. Reason: .
    "If you are caught in a rainstorm, once you accept that you'll receive a soaking, the only thing left to do is enjoy the walk"
    • MaliyahSunset
    • By MaliyahSunset 12th Oct 17, 6:20 AM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    MaliyahSunset
    • #5
    • 12th Oct 17, 6:20 AM
    • #5
    • 12th Oct 17, 6:20 AM
    My last job was ok apart from standing all day long.
    Last edited by MaliyahSunset; 13-10-2017 at 5:37 PM.
    • neartowhere
    • By neartowhere 13th Oct 17, 3:42 AM
    • 2 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    neartowhere
    • #6
    • 13th Oct 17, 3:42 AM
    • #6
    • 13th Oct 17, 3:42 AM
    I experienced the same thing before. I quickly resigned when I reached my 2nd month. I was not happy and I don't think I will be comfortable. I just said it nicely that I need to resign and fortunately, she just said ok.
    • lillie421
    • By lillie421 13th Oct 17, 9:37 AM
    • 44 Posts
    • 23 Thanks
    lillie421
    • #7
    • 13th Oct 17, 9:37 AM
    • #7
    • 13th Oct 17, 9:37 AM
    Take a look at your contract and it should have some information about how much notice you need to give them. In this instance, whether your boss is approachable or not doesn't really matter. If you aren't happy, don't stay there. There is no choice but to talk to her.
    I would definitely make sure that there was still a position available at your old job before you leave your current one and if not, stay there until you find something else.
    Good luck!!
    • indianabones
    • By indianabones 13th Oct 17, 1:49 PM
    • 193 Posts
    • 198 Thanks
    indianabones
    • #8
    • 13th Oct 17, 1:49 PM
    • #8
    • 13th Oct 17, 1:49 PM
    Only you know whether you can afford a period of time away from employment and if so how long. That should be the determining factor as to when you resign and I think most of us agree if you're unhappy and see no change to your normal work patter, you should resign.

    Make sure you have something lined up before you resign if finance is an issue.

    Don't ever feel uncomfortable or scared about resigning. It is your life and your decision as to what you do with it. Perhaps they will improve their application process or better still improve the way they operate to ensure they don't see others in the situation like you.

    Once you have a new contract in your hand, write a simple 2 line draft email stating your resignation and the last date. Based on your contract, if it's stated as a week, then use that date. It's probably best to finish on a Friday, who knows they might even let you leave early or give a week's garden leave. Good luck.
    • MaliyahSunset
    • By MaliyahSunset 13th Oct 17, 2:35 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    MaliyahSunset
    • #9
    • 13th Oct 17, 2:35 PM
    • #9
    • 13th Oct 17, 2:35 PM
    I wouldnít be able to leave without having something else lined up as jobs here are pot luck. I rang my previous employer today (well he was on holiday so I spoke to the manager), but because the time of year they probably wonít be hiring. So Iím guessing the answer will most likely be no.
    Thanks all for your help and good wishes.
    Last edited by MaliyahSunset; 13-10-2017 at 5:38 PM.
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