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  • FIRST POST
    • Fireflyaway
    • By Fireflyaway 18th Mar 17, 8:54 AM
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    Fireflyaway
    Interview outfit?!
    • #1
    • 18th Mar 17, 8:54 AM
    Interview outfit?! 18th Mar 17 at 8:54 AM
    I have an interview coming up and had intended to wear either smart trousers / skirt and a shirt or smart top. However family members are telling me I should wear a suit.

    I don't want to feel restricted and hot and many company's don't seem to dress in suits these days.

    If you are someone who interviews does it make a difference?
Page 1
    • agrinnall
    • By agrinnall 18th Mar 17, 9:05 AM
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    agrinnall
    • #2
    • 18th Mar 17, 9:05 AM
    • #2
    • 18th Mar 17, 9:05 AM
    For the sake of clarity, can you confirm your gender (the advice may differ depending on the answer)? And what type of job is it? There's not much point in telling you what to wear for an interview as a senior manager if the job is as a sewage worker (to take things to extremes!).
    • Fireflyaway
    • By Fireflyaway 18th Mar 17, 9:23 AM
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    Fireflyaway
    • #3
    • 18th Mar 17, 9:23 AM
    • #3
    • 18th Mar 17, 9:23 AM
    Thanks. I'm female and its for a project coordinator for a charity.
    • LadyMcFinch
    • By LadyMcFinch 18th Mar 17, 9:39 AM
    • 13 Posts
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    LadyMcFinch
    • #4
    • 18th Mar 17, 9:39 AM
    • #4
    • 18th Mar 17, 9:39 AM
    I know you asked for people who interview and I don't interview, but for what it's worth I've never worn a suit for an interview, I don't want to spend the money on a good one and could never find a reasonably priced one that looked good!

    I wear a smart dress (A-line, knee length navy silk, to be specific) and I've got every job I've interviewed for (3 in the past few years due to relocating). I'm a professional working in the public sector, I'd expect some of the private practices in my field would expect a suit but for a charity I reckon you'd been fine with what you're planning. Obviously a suit is a safe bet, but I don't think it's necessary.
    Last edited by LadyMcFinch; 18-03-2017 at 9:42 AM.
    • marliepanda
    • By marliepanda 18th Mar 17, 11:31 AM
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    marliepanda
    • #5
    • 18th Mar 17, 11:31 AM
    • #5
    • 18th Mar 17, 11:31 AM
    As long as you look clean tidy and smart it shouldn't matter what particular item of clothing you are wearing.
    Survey Earnings 2017 - £163
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 18th Mar 17, 11:33 AM
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    TELLIT01
    • #6
    • 18th Mar 17, 11:33 AM
    • #6
    • 18th Mar 17, 11:33 AM
    Smart clothing, of the type which would be appropriate for the work you would be doing, would seem the sensible option to me. I don't think a suit would be necessary. Sadly, the answer would be different if you were a man (I'm a bloke and have always hated wearing a suit).
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 18th Mar 17, 11:37 AM
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    NeilCr
    • #7
    • 18th Mar 17, 11:37 AM
    • #7
    • 18th Mar 17, 11:37 AM
    Have done a lot of interviewing in the past. Just started again for volunteers

    I don't think a suit is necessary. I'd say that most of the women I have interviewed did not wear a suit. Smart is good

    I am completely with TELLIT01 on suits for men. Hate them, hate them, hate them! Apart from a wedding I haven't worn a suit in the nine years since I retired.
    • pupgrum
    • By pupgrum 18th Mar 17, 1:49 PM
    • 124 Posts
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    pupgrum
    • #8
    • 18th Mar 17, 1:49 PM
    • #8
    • 18th Mar 17, 1:49 PM
    Skirt. For women, long as you look hot everything else does not matter. Sex sells. Political correctness aside, it's true that better looking people always get the better paying job.
    • Lioness Twinkletoes
    • By Lioness Twinkletoes 18th Mar 17, 1:52 PM
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    Lioness Twinkletoes
    • #9
    • 18th Mar 17, 1:52 PM
    • #9
    • 18th Mar 17, 1:52 PM
    Skirt. For women, long as you look hot everything else does not matter. Sex sells. Political correctness aside, it's true that better looking people always get the better paying job.
    Originally posted by pupgrum
    Taking your dubious logic a step further does this mean if the OP is not 'hot' and is, in fact, hideous (at best mediocre), she should:

    A) Not bother attending as she has no chance, despite potentially have the best skill set for the job
    b) Wear a bin bag and a hood so as not to offend with her hideous looks?

    • pupgrum
    • By pupgrum 18th Mar 17, 2:21 PM
    • 124 Posts
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    pupgrum
    Taking your dubious logic a step further does this mean if the OP is not 'hot' and is, in fact, hideous (at best mediocre), she should:

    A) Not bother attending as she has no chance, despite potentially have the best skill set for the job
    b) Wear a bin bag and a hood so as not to offend with her hideous looks?

    Originally posted by Lioness Twinkletoes
    Long as the good looking woman is trainable, who cares? I have seen this a number of times, the skilled candidate is rejected and the better looking candidate is hired, despite lacking the skills. If you're hiring a surgeon then yes, the skillset matters the most, but for most jobs, not so much. Why hire someone so skilled they can be a threat to your own job in the future when you can hire someone whose appearance is attractive, and looks good to have walking about when a client walks into the office?

    I don't think anyone should ever wear a bin bag. You don't need to hide, but it's true you lose out to attractive women.
    • cavework
    • By cavework 18th Mar 17, 2:30 PM
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    cavework
    Which are you.. The good looking woman or the skilled candidate? Why are you aiming this just at women? are you a woman ? You really sound very sour and bitter. Women ( I hope) are employed for their skills and qualifications ..not because of the length of their skirt???
    Last edited by cavework; 18-03-2017 at 2:38 PM.
    • Lioness Twinkletoes
    • By Lioness Twinkletoes 18th Mar 17, 2:42 PM
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    Lioness Twinkletoes
    Long as the good looking woman is trainable, who cares? I have seen this a number of times, the skilled candidate is rejected and the better looking candidate is hired, despite lacking the skills. If you're hiring a surgeon then yes, the skillset matters the most, but for most jobs, not so much. Why hire someone so skilled they can be a threat to your own job in the future when you can hire someone whose appearance is attractive, and looks good to have walking about when a client walks into the office?

    I don't think anyone should ever wear a bin bag. You don't need to hide, but it's true you lose out to attractive women.
    Originally posted by pupgrum
    You do realise I was mocking you, don't you?
    • cavework
    • By cavework 18th Mar 17, 2:57 PM
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    cavework
    pupgrum....you really have a weird way of looking at employment. I honestly do not like your references regarding female employees....it is offensive or uneducated ..you choose
    Why on earth do you imagine in this day and age that the length of a skirt or the attractiveness of a woman employee should be taken into consideration? You TBH are still living in the 70's and I suspect you still have the mullet hair style...
    Last edited by cavework; 18-03-2017 at 3:00 PM.
    • trailingspouse
    • By trailingspouse 18th Mar 17, 7:03 PM
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    trailingspouse
    Fireflyaway - I agree with previous posters that suits are no longer necessary, just look smart and professional.

    Pupgrum - you're neither terribly smart, nor terribly professional, are you? I don't employ people who can't cope in a modern workplace, so I hope you won't be applying to work for me any time soon. This attitude really isn't appropriate any more. It might have been funny once, but that was a while ago now. I suspect you are either an older man who hasn't noticed how times have changed, or you're quite young and naive, and you're repeating stuff you've heard other people say in the past.
    • Voyager2002
    • By Voyager2002 18th Mar 17, 7:45 PM
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    Voyager2002
    FWIW I have often conducted interviews in a charity context.

    The panel always included senior management of the charity, who are female, so the comments about looking 'hot' are certainly wrong in my experience.

    I remember one unsuccessful candidate who wore a suit, and our feedback to her (the polite version) was that we felt that she would be a poor fit for our organisational culture. While I remember quite a lot of the things that the successful candidates said I cannot remember at all what they were wearing.
    • keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    • By keepcalmandstayoutofdebt 18th Mar 17, 8:41 PM
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    keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    its for a project coordinator for a charity.
    Originally posted by Fireflyaway
    As the weather allows around this time I would wear a suit, unless I already saw or know people already working there.

    What's that saying you dress to the position.

    It's a hard one, my last interview was for a charity office and I was kind of glad I went smart definately as the position arose simply due to retirement and so the interviewers/co workers were of the more mature years so it was a little old fashioned. Though it did bucket down on me on the day because I was more worried of the do I carry my coat around with me! I definately got the wrong time!

    Good luck
    "If you are caught in a rainstorm, once you accept that you'll receive a soaking, the only thing left to do is enjoy the walk"
    • xapprenticex
    • By xapprenticex 18th Mar 17, 8:51 PM
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    xapprenticex
    I think being a 'hot' female can be an advantage or disadvantage, you could be interviewed by a guy who finds you very attractive and hires you over others (assuming you are qualified to do the role) or you can be interviewed by a woman who is the current 'hot' one who sees you as a threat OR they may not consider your looks at all. But it does happen, not that its the right thing to do or anything.
    • Fireflyaway
    • By Fireflyaway 18th Mar 17, 9:20 PM
    • 1,296 Posts
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    Fireflyaway
    Thanks everyone. My aim is to look smart and definitely not ' sexy' , ' hot' or anything similar! This is a project coordinator job, not a position at hooters.
    If I was to get overlooked in favour of someone more physically attractive so be it. I want to be hired for my skills, not because the interviewer fancies me.
    • bouicca21
    • By bouicca21 18th Mar 17, 10:42 PM
    • 3,231 Posts
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    bouicca21
    Smart, clean and tidy. Simples.

    I'd never expect a woman to wear a suit. Personally I wouldn't expect a man to either, but I know that a lot of male candidates feel more confident in a suit.
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 19th Mar 17, 1:21 AM
    • 37,823 Posts
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    Savvy_Sue
    I've never worn a suit. It is tbh a long time since I had an interview, but I think my experience still holds good - and I now work for a charity.

    We were interviewing for someone to replace me in my previous job. I noticed that I was wearing a black jacket, my two colleagues interviewing with me were wearing black jackets, and each of the three candidates wore a black jacket, all with dark skirts or trousers. I vowed never to wear a black jacket to an interview!

    I had a cornflour blue jacket, a bright pink jacket, and yes, a black jacket. If I wore the blue or pink jacket, I wore black trousers. If I wore the black jacket, I wore blue trousers. I cannot remember which I was wearing when I got my current job.

    In part this desire to stand out stemmed from that previous job: as part of it I had to organise dance auditions, and we requested candidates NOT to wear black leotards and tights but to choose something distinctive. We didn't want to number them, but we had to distinguish them.

    So I'd say you want to stand out from other candidates, but obviously in a good way. There's no harm in dressing above the smartness you'd expect to wear in this new role (definitely do so if you expect to wear jeans and trainers!) but I'd say comfort and practicality trump suits every time. Not that a suit can't be practical! And that's where a jacket can be good - you want a tissue handy, maybe a pen etc. But it doesn't have to be a suit.

    When I'm representing the charity I work for, I tend to 'dress up'. As it happens, I have a dark jacket in one of our logo colours, which I team with a pale shirt in one of our other colours. Usually smart trousers because I hate skirts ...

    I'd say charities tend to be more 'traditional' in their outlook but it does depend on the charity and how long it's been running, and who's involved in interviewing you.

    I'm thinking what my colleagues / our trustees wear when they are interviewing people, and I don't think suits feature very highly!
    Still knitting!
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