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  • FIRST POST
    • ralam
    • By ralam 16th Mar 17, 6:39 PM
    • 1Posts
    • 0Thanks
    ralam
    NHS Prescription Fraud
    • #1
    • 16th Mar 17, 6:39 PM
    NHS Prescription Fraud 16th Mar 17 at 6:39 PM
    I had a HC2 exemption form that meant I got free prescriptions. That expired over two years ago. Since then I have bought my medication from the local pharmacy.

    Recently the doctor electronically sent the a prescription to the pharmacy. Without my permission they delivered the prescription to my home. I didn't realize straight away and obviously this meant I didn't pay for it.

    Soon after I get a penalty charge notice saying that I did prescription fraud and I am asked to pay over £100.

    I called the NHS prescription department and they said they can't help me and that if I can get the pharmacy to admit liability then they can pay the charge for me. The pharmacy are not admitting liability.

    These are my main points of concern

    1. The pharmacy does not need to see continued record of exemption during the validity of the certificate.
    -Validity being the main point. The certificate expired over two years ago and so was not valid, and as such they would need to see proof of exemption right?

    2. Since July 2016, the pharmacy is required by its terms of use to inform me during every transaction that because they didn't see my certificate of exemption, NHS will routinely do fraud checks.
    - They didn't inform me of this.
    -Had they informed me of this I would have been able to remind them that I pay for my prescriptions and I am not exempt.

    3. They said it is my responsibility to inform them that I do not hold a HC2 exemption letter.
    - Wouldn't me paying for prescriptions after the HC2 expired imply that I am no longer exempt, especially since they need to check this when they fill out the prescription.

    I just want to know where I stand, because i honestly think the pharmacy are liable.
Page 2
    • preciousillusions
    • By preciousillusions 19th Mar 17, 9:31 PM
    • 519 Posts
    • 718 Thanks
    preciousillusions
    I get my prescriptions delivered (including controlled drugs) via a service called pharmacy2u and they don't need to be signed for, they are simply tracked. Sometimes they just come through the post-box.

    I really don't blame the OP to be honest as the cost of a prescription is so much these days and yes, some people are struggling to afford the medication they need (I feel very very lucky to be able to get all of mine free, on medical based as well as benefit exemption grounds). It doesn't make this right but I can understand why someone would be tempted to try and get away with it under certain circumstances, and fact is that we do not know the full background here. People are very quick to judge.
    • TBagpuss
    • By TBagpuss 19th Mar 17, 10:02 PM
    • 5,528 Posts
    • 7,247 Thanks
    TBagpuss
    Recently the doctor electronically sent the a prescription to the pharmacy. Without my permission they delivered the prescription to my home. I didn't realize straight away and obviously this meant I didn't pay for it.
    OP, are you saying that you didn't realise that the prescription had been delivered? Or that you knew it had been delivered but forgot that you hadn't paid for it?

    Did you sign for the prescription? If you did, then I don't think you have any chance at all of convincing anyone that you were not responsible, as you knew that you did not have an exemption.

    If you did not sign for the prescription, then it's slightly hazier but again, I think that you are likely to be asked why you didn't contact the pharmacy as soon as you realised that the prescription had been delivered but not paid for.
    • Marktheshark
    • By Marktheshark 19th Mar 17, 10:06 PM
    • 5,521 Posts
    • 6,924 Thanks
    Marktheshark
    Grow up.....
    Originally posted by Dullville
    What like trolling forums to castigate sick and vulnerable people caught out by a businesses mistake ?
    That kind of growing up ?

    No Thanks.
    Brexit will become whatever they invent it to be.
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 20th Mar 17, 8:13 AM
    • 3,571 Posts
    • 3,640 Thanks
    TELLIT01
    Did you not read the link, its not true you can still get paper prescriptions seriously its not true your GP cannot insist that you nominate anyone they really cant - I have checked and rechecked this,

    look at this
    https://digital.nhs.uk/Electronic-Prescription-Service/statistics-and-progress
    Originally posted by Londonsu
    I don't doubt that you are correct to say that the GP can't insist on this, but if you're at your GP and they say 'By the way the system is changing and we need you to nominate a pharmacy for your prescription to be sent to' most people would just accept that at being what will happen.
    I'm pleased to hear it's not mandatory as I can imagine our GP 'suggesting' that people use the pharmacy next door to the surgery, and receiving some form of commission from them. I might be wrong of course.
    • pmduk
    • By pmduk 20th Mar 17, 9:37 AM
    • 7,240 Posts
    • 5,219 Thanks
    pmduk

    My Local Boots tried that on with me the other day, I told them that's A its not convenient and I will be having paper prescriptions and B If I was mandated to chose the EPS service I would not choose them because they keep @@@@@@ up my husbands prescriptions and I am sick of them (in a loud voice)
    Originally posted by Londonsu
    Most of my friends are switching their Boots' EPS Nominations for precisely the same reason as our local branch is rubbish.
    • Flugelhorn
    • By Flugelhorn 20th Mar 17, 9:42 AM
    • 573 Posts
    • 783 Thanks
    Flugelhorn
    I don't doubt that you are correct to say that the GP can't insist on this, but if you're at your GP and they say 'By the way the system is changing and we need you to nominate a pharmacy for your prescription to be sent to' most people would just accept that at being what will happen.
    I'm pleased to hear it's not mandatory as I can imagine our GP 'suggesting' that people use the pharmacy next door to the surgery, and receiving some form of commission from them. I might be wrong of course.
    Originally posted by TELLIT01
    Definitely not allowed to recommend or suggest any pharmacy - occasionally I have to fax a script to a pharmacy in the local town and people don't know which one they want to go to - I can't even suggest one - just rattle off a list of names in a random order
    • dippy3103
    • By dippy3103 20th Mar 17, 9:43 AM
    • 1,639 Posts
    • 2,495 Thanks
    dippy3103
    My prescriptions go electronically to pharmacy. I still have to sign a declaration to say that I have a prepayment card.
    If they are giving you a penalty then you must have signed something to say that you are entitled
    • takman
    • By takman 20th Mar 17, 10:35 AM
    • 2,278 Posts
    • 1,893 Thanks
    takman
    I get my prescriptions delivered (including controlled drugs) via a service called pharmacy2u and they don't need to be signed for, they are simply tracked. Sometimes they just come through the post-box.

    I really don't blame the OP to be honest as the cost of a prescription is so much these days and yes, some people are struggling to afford the medication they need (I feel very very lucky to be able to get all of mine free, on medical based as well as benefit exemption grounds). It doesn't make this right but I can understand why someone would be tempted to try and get away with it under certain circumstances, and fact is that we do not know the full background here. People are very quick to judge.
    Originally posted by preciousillusions


    Prescriptions arn't expensive at all, the most that anyone has to ever pay is £2 a week for unlimited items!. When you compare that to the actual cost of medicine your paying on a very small fraction of the actual cost.


    So if someone who has to pay for prescriptions is saying they can't afford £2 a week then they need to sit down and budget properly!. A lot of people spend that on lottery tickets!.
    • dippy3103
    • By dippy3103 20th Mar 17, 11:00 AM
    • 1,639 Posts
    • 2,495 Thanks
    dippy3103
    Prescriptions arn't expensive at all, the most that anyone has to ever pay is £2 a week for unlimited items!. When you compare that to the actual cost of medicine your paying on a very small fraction of the actual cost.


    So if someone who has to pay for prescriptions is saying they can't afford £2 a week then they need to sit down and budget properly!. A lot of people spend that on lottery tickets!.
    Originally posted by takman
    I pay for my pre payment card by direct debit. It's under a tenner a month. I have 6 items on repeat presecription. It's paid for its self over and over .
    • pmduk
    • By pmduk 20th Mar 17, 3:21 PM
    • 7,240 Posts
    • 5,219 Thanks
    pmduk
    If they are giving you a penalty then you must have signed something to say that you are entitled
    Originally posted by dippy3103
    If you reread the OP it was the pharmacy that completed the declaration.
    • Londonsu
    • By Londonsu 20th Mar 17, 7:09 PM
    • 1,280 Posts
    • 2,728 Thanks
    Londonsu
    I don't doubt that you are correct to say that the GP can't insist on this, but if you're at your GP and they say 'By the way the system is changing and we need you to nominate a pharmacy for your prescription to be sent to' most people would just accept that at being what will happen.
    I'm pleased to hear it's not mandatory as I can imagine our GP 'suggesting' that people use the pharmacy next door to the surgery, and receiving some form of commission from them. I might be wrong of course.
    Originally posted by TELLIT01

    This is why they do it and there is actually a scientific reason for it, there is a wide gulf between intention and action, you can invite people to nominate but a lot of people wont bother or put it off even though they would be more than happy to join it, if you tell someone its mandatory and they wont get their next prescription unless they do (even though its a bare faced lie) then people will comply and 90% of them will be happy they have done so (me, I am an awkward madam and will be happy to show them a print out of the rules but then I am in the minority).


    There is actually a whole department dedicated to getting patients to comply for quite a few things, its called the behavioural insight team, they have increased the uptake of the NHS Health Check, just by changing the invite letter its quite fascinating although it didn't work with me
    Last edited by Londonsu; 20-03-2017 at 7:12 PM.
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