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  • FIRST POST
    • JackieO
    • By JackieO 27th Feb 17, 4:33 PM
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    JackieO
    Love Food, Hate Waste
    • #1
    • 27th Feb 17, 4:33 PM
    Love Food, Hate Waste 27th Feb 17 at 4:33 PM
    I have been surfing around the internet this afternoon and found a site about Stop Wasting Food I think had quite a good idea ,in that instead of restricting ourselves from certain stuff during Lent perhaps it would be better to limit the over buying, and use up the initial stuff we already have .There is apparently a Russian young lady who seemingly has reduced the amount that Dennmark wastes by changing peoples out look in the supermarkets, and they have significantly reduced the amount of stuff being binned into landfill

    Now to me that seems like a pretty good idea. The supermarkets have reduced amounts binned by instead of offering BOGOFFs they have reduced single purchases so its more economical to buy less. Doesn't sound like a bad idea ,I can understand people buying large amounts if they have larger families, but how often have we all been swayed by BOGOFFs,myself included. What do you all think ?



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    Last edited by MSE Andrea; 13-09-2017 at 9:14 AM.
    Quot Libra,Quam Breve Tempus.
Page 1
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 27th Feb 17, 4:45 PM
    • 13,426 Posts
    • 36,588 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    • #2
    • 27th Feb 17, 4:45 PM
    • #2
    • 27th Feb 17, 4:45 PM
    I think BOGOF's have long been a bone of contention to smaller households - ie we can't take advantage of the savings involved in getting them = because we would not be able to eat all the food involved before some of it went off on us. Anything that would involve just charging for the amount a smaller household would actually want has got to be good news.

    Long past time that supermarkets catered more for us. Add the fact that many people (even in bigger households) are only going to require a small amount of some ingredients (ie the more "interesting" ones) from the fact that recipes often only require tiny amounts of some of the ingredients and it's then a case of how to use up the rest.
    If there's "4 tendencies" type of people (Gretchen Rubin) = yep....Questioner type here
    - Meets an expectation only if they believe it's justified and resists anything arbitrary or ineffective
    • JackieO
    • By JackieO 27th Feb 17, 5:13 PM
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    JackieO
    • #3
    • 27th Feb 17, 5:13 PM
    • #3
    • 27th Feb 17, 5:13 PM
    I think BOGOF's have long been a bone of contention to smaller households. Anything that would involve just charging for the amount a smaller household would actually want has got to be good news.

    Long past time that supermarkets catered more for us. Add the fact that many people (even in bigger households) are only going to require a small amount of some ingredients (ie the more "interesting" ones) from the fact that recipes often only require tiny amounts of some of the ingredients and it's then a case of how to use up the rest.
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention
    probably why we end up with stuff that gets binned in the cupboards
    I have decided that I will use at least some items if I can over the next week, and hopefully not feel the need to replace them I have half a jar of hollandaise sauce, and some cajun spices to use up plus a half packet of what I think is a marinade sauce in the fridge These will be used up wth stuff from the freezer if I can.

    Tonight I have a bit of pork loin slice from the freezer which I am going to use the marinade with and make some HM wedges sprinkled with cajun spices, I will use up the rst of the brocolli in the fridge and also some of the sweetheart cabbage which I will steam.Any left over cabbage will be used tomorrow with grated cheese on top and some fish from the freezer and some of the hollandasie sauce
    Quot Libra,Quam Breve Tempus.
    • Mr_Singleton
    • By Mr_Singleton 27th Feb 17, 5:21 PM
    • 665 Posts
    • 1,449 Thanks
    Mr_Singleton
    • #4
    • 27th Feb 17, 5:21 PM
    • #4
    • 27th Feb 17, 5:21 PM
    Ultimately food is way way too cheap. How much bread would you throw away if it was a decent £4 loaf as opposed to the industrial rubbish that costs 40p?
    • Nelski
    • By Nelski 27th Feb 17, 5:29 PM
    • 12,023 Posts
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    Nelski
    • #5
    • 27th Feb 17, 5:29 PM
    • #5
    • 27th Feb 17, 5:29 PM
    I don't recognise Lent but have been on a use up campaign since new year. I am genuinely shocked at myself for the amount of food I have accumulated in my 2 freezers and numerous cupboards.

    Anyway since 31st Dec which was my last online shopping delivery I have not bought anything significant bar a couple of cheap loafs of bread and some potatoes/veg and have managed to have good meals from the freezer every day. Embarrassingly I think I probably will be able to manage for at least another 2 months so far more than 44 days for me
    • JackieO
    • By JackieO 27th Feb 17, 5:30 PM
    • 15,237 Posts
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    JackieO
    • #6
    • 27th Feb 17, 5:30 PM
    • #6
    • 27th Feb 17, 5:30 PM
    Ultimately food is way way too cheap. How much bread would you throw away if it was a decent £4 loaf as opposed to the industrial rubbish that costs 40p?
    Originally posted by Mr_Singleton
    Unfortunately there are a good few folk who couldn't afford a £4.00 loaf I am old enough to remember when a large loaf went up from elevenpence halfpenny to a shilling and the furore that created I am quite lucky in that I gave up eating bread of any sort about two years ago,don't miss it at all
    Quot Libra,Quam Breve Tempus.
    • caronc
    • By caronc 27th Feb 17, 5:35 PM
    • 2,222 Posts
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    caronc
    • #7
    • 27th Feb 17, 5:35 PM
    • #7
    • 27th Feb 17, 5:35 PM
    I'm not intending giving up anything for Lent but am working on reducing my household stocks to a more appropriate level for a single person household. If I really didn't mind what I ate I would still probably at the moment have enough to last 3 or 4 months but it would end up being fairly monotonous and unhealthy so it's a long term project for me. I don't waste stuff though I just need to keep tweaking my buying habits. That said if I see a really good offer on a bigger pack of something I know I will use and it can be frozen I'm not going to ignore it
    May GC £150/£150, June GC £117/£120, July £185/£170, August £108/£120, Sep GC £109/£120
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 27th Feb 17, 6:15 PM
    • 17,625 Posts
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    Pollycat
    • #8
    • 27th Feb 17, 6:15 PM
    • #8
    • 27th Feb 17, 6:15 PM
    I'm not giving anything up for Lent either.
    Although I was sent to a Methodist Sunday school, I'm not religious.

    Ultimately food is way way too cheap. How much bread would you throw away if it was a decent £4 loaf as opposed to the industrial rubbish that costs 40p?
    Originally posted by Mr_Singleton
    I've not thrown bread away for years.
    I usually have a thick sliced loaf (or buy a 800gm unsliced & do it myself) & a pack of granary rolls that we use for lunchtime sandwiches a couple of times a week.
    Both are in the freezer.
    I replace when we're running low.
    I have a pack of burger buns in the freezer too as I'm doing home made burgers tonight = they were bought YS
    I'll use the rest over a month or so for bacon butties etc.

    I can't remember the last time I threw food away.

    I don't mind BOGOF deals.
    I have an integrated garage and have shelves in there for food and other stuff so buy coffee, tomatoes etc when on offer.
    I rarely pay full price for anything.
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 27th Feb 17, 6:29 PM
    • 59,916 Posts
    • 350,249 Thanks
    PasturesNew
    • #9
    • 27th Feb 17, 6:29 PM
    • #9
    • 27th Feb 17, 6:29 PM
    How much bread would you throw away if it was a decent £4 loaf as opposed to the industrial rubbish that costs 40p?
    Originally posted by Mr_Singleton
    None, because I'd not be able to afford to buy it in the first place
    I'd switch to some cheaper food. So long as there's something edible I could eat that'd do.

    I don't throw away a single slice of the 40p loaves; they're the ones I buy and I eat every slice.
    • Ilona
    • By Ilona 27th Feb 17, 6:39 PM
    • 1,872 Posts
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    Ilona
    I can't understand why anyone throws any food away. You buy it, it costs money, it's in the house, just chuffin well eat it. Even if you don't fancy it, if you had the same the day before, and the day before that. It's food, it keeps your body alive. People in the world are starving, it's criminal to buy food then chuck it away.

    Ilona
    I love skip diving
    • VJsmum
    • By VJsmum 27th Feb 17, 6:47 PM
    • 4,733 Posts
    • 68,190 Thanks
    VJsmum
    My household would throw more food away if i didn't live here - OH will eat what he fancies, regardless of if there is stuff to use up.

    I put ham, etc in the fridge in date order - this usually means that salami or prosciutto is at the bottom as they have longer dates. But if OH wants prosciutto he will dig it out, even if there is ham with a sell by date of today. I make wrinkled veg into soup or curry, he would chuck it.

    Today i had a left over roast dinner from yesterday - OH wouldn't have dreamed of having that, but he's not here and it saves me from cooking and saves money.
    You're out with a friend in the capital, I'm a thousand leagues under the sea
    You're hovering worriedly over your eggs, And I'm pondering trees
    I'm wandering long, And I'm pondering trees
    For you and me
    Guy Garvey
    • *Margaret*
    • By *Margaret* 27th Feb 17, 7:06 PM
    • 88 Posts
    • 1,019 Thanks
    *Margaret*
    Ultimately food is way way too cheap. How much bread would you throw away if it was a decent £4 loaf as opposed to the industrial rubbish that costs 40p?
    Originally posted by Mr_Singleton
    The industrial rubbish I buy is 36p, actually. I don't waste any of it, having bought it today half of it has gone into the freezer for next week. I don't like the heels so I grate them and use them as breadcrumbs in recipes that ask for them.

    I obviously don't want price to be the only consideration when it comes to food production, but if bread was £4 and everything else was more than 10 times the price too I would struggle much more. I don't see how it makes sense for poorer people to struggle in the hope that it will stop richer people wasting food. I'm sure there are fairer ways to encourage people not to waste food.

    Anyway, I'm just off to have some toast
    • funfairprincess
    • By funfairprincess 27th Feb 17, 8:02 PM
    • 1,673 Posts
    • 34,413 Thanks
    funfairprincess
    I'm totally guilty of wasting food.
    Bread for one, some days I can go through 2 loaves no problem other times I feel I'm throwing 3/4 of a loaf out.
    So I'm in for lent. It will make me think about what I actually do need to buy.
    I'm not a muggle...I'm just magically challenged
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 27th Feb 17, 9:01 PM
    • 59,916 Posts
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    PasturesNew
    I'm sure there are fairer ways to encourage people not to waste food.
    Originally posted by *Margaret*
    Ration books .... that'd work.

    Ditto for household energy use...
    • kboss2010
    • By kboss2010 27th Feb 17, 9:15 PM
    • 1,029 Posts
    • 7,741 Thanks
    kboss2010
    The industrial rubbish I buy is 36p, actually. I don't waste any of it, having bought it today half of it has gone into the freezer for next week. I don't like the heels so I grate them and use them as breadcrumbs in recipes that ask for them.

    I obviously don't want price to be the only consideration when it comes to food production, but if bread was £4 and everything else was more than 10 times the price too I would struggle much more.I don't see how it makes sense for poorer people to struggle in the hope that it will stop richer people wasting food. I'm sure there are fairer ways to encourage people not to waste food.

    Anyway, I'm just off to have some toast
    Originally posted by *Margaret*
    The bolded bit.

    I was watching that food programme with Roux Jnr on it which I really quite like but there was a frightfully obnoxious woman on it a few weeks ago with a section waxing lyrical about how food is too cheap and prices should be raised to cut wastage and it made me

    I'm not rolling in money, I'm frugal by choice and don't waste what I have. I'm in a comfortable situation where large price rises would annoy me because I'd have to spend a bit less on hobbies etc but I wouldn't starve *touch wood* BUT when we have a nation so divided by wealth, with record numbers using foodbanks because they're having to choose between heating & eating and having been close to that myself not a million years ago when a min. wage part-time job was all I could get, the (perhaps unintentional) ignorance of privilege of my fellow "middle-class" folk annoys the stuffing out of me.

    Just like alcohol, price increases only affect the behaviour of the poor and, unlike alcohol and with such a vital thing like food, you can almost guarantee that it isn't the poor wasting food - it's the folk who can afford to throw away hundreds of £ of food a year who need to be curbed and if they're doing that then they're not going to care about their food bill rising.

    Raising prices has never been an effective solution to changing behaviour - be that alcohol, smoking or anything else - it just disproportionally affects those who are already struggling. It's madness!

    Anywho, I don't understand why people have to throw away food like bread, cheese, leftover meals, soft fruit, vegetables etc., most of that stuff can be frozen when it's close to being past its best and fruit used for smoothies, veg used for soup, cheese grated & used for sauces or garnish, bread for toast etc. Etc.

    More education on how to check food, store it and defrost it correctly is what is needed. My OH drives me scatty about refusing to eat certain foods which have been frozen because he was raised to be slightly paranoid about food poisoning. Fair enough but he's a scientist like me, he should have got over his irrational fear of salmonella & E.coli by now lol!
    Last edited by kboss2010; 27-02-2017 at 9:24 PM.
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    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 28th Feb 17, 9:11 AM
    • 17,625 Posts
    • 44,863 Thanks
    Pollycat
    I think a lot of people who post on here don't have much food waste as a lot menu plan to use stuff up.
    I buy a family pack of mushrooms and a family pack of peppers and know that I'll use them all up in a few different dishes..
    Much more cost effective than buying 1 green pepper for a specific recipe.

    If I have half a cabbage left over from a dinner, I'll freeze it and use it to add to mashed potatoes in a shepherd's pie - ups your 10 a day count too.
    Ditto cauliflower, I'll either mash it to add to mashed potatoes or blanch/freeze and use it in gobi aloo.

    And meat left over from a dinner will be sliced and frozen for another easy dinner.

    I was horrified when I went to my friend's house for dinner and she just bundled up all the leftovers - including half of a roast beef joint - and dumped it all in the bin.

    It's people like this who need educating about food wastage.
    Last edited by Pollycat; 28-02-2017 at 10:08 AM.
    • Ilona
    • By Ilona 28th Feb 17, 10:29 AM
    • 1,872 Posts
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    Ilona

    I was horrified when I went to my friend's house for dinner and she just bundled up all the leftovers - including half of a roast beef joint - and dumped it all in the bin.
    Originally posted by Pollycat
    I was at a house on Christmas Day for dinner. Everyone left food on their plate, except me, I ate all I was given. Shocking waste.

    Ilona
    I love skip diving
    • usernameisvalid
    • By usernameisvalid 28th Feb 17, 10:46 AM
    • 288 Posts
    • 727 Thanks
    usernameisvalid
    I think a lot of people who post on here don't have much food waste as a lot menu plan to use stuff up.
    I buy a family pack of mushrooms and a family pack of peppers and know that I'll use them all up in a few different dishes..
    Much more cost effective than buying 1 green pepper for a specific recipe.

    If I have half a cabbage left over from a dinner, I'll freeze it and use it to add to mashed potatoes in a shepherd's pie - ups your 10 a day count too.
    Ditto cauliflower, I'll either mash it to add to mashed potatoes or blanch/freeze and use it in gobi aloo.

    And meat left over from a dinner will be sliced and frozen for another easy dinner.

    I was horrified when I went to my friend's house for dinner and she just bundled up all the leftovers - including half of a roast beef joint - and dumped it all in the bin.

    It's people like this who need educating about food wastage.
    Originally posted by Pollycat
    Pollycat, I've a friend whose worse then that. She goes through her freezer and anything older then 3 months gets binned

    I told her to bin it my direction. She thinks I'm joking
    • MallyGirl
    • By MallyGirl 28th Feb 17, 10:53 AM
    • 1,902 Posts
    • 6,345 Thanks
    MallyGirl
    My household would throw more food away if i didn't live here - OH will eat what he fancies, regardless of if there is stuff to use up.

    I put ham, etc in the fridge in date order - this usually means that salami or prosciutto is at the bottom as they have longer dates. But if OH wants prosciutto he will dig it out, even if there is ham with a sell by date of today. I make wrinkled veg into soup or curry, he would chuck it.

    Today i had a left over roast dinner from yesterday - OH wouldn't have dreamed of having that, but he's not here and it saves me from cooking and saves money.
    Originally posted by VJsmum
    Same here - my lunches are often leftovers from the night before.

    OH can take direction on what to eat but doesn't think ahead. I was away last week and he used the fridge contents and freezer list ok, but when I got back there were raw sausages about to go out of date and a portion of cooked meatballs in sauce in a pot. It would not occur him to put these items in the freezer before they became unsafe to eat.
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 28th Feb 17, 11:00 AM
    • 17,625 Posts
    • 44,863 Thanks
    Pollycat
    I was at a house on Christmas Day for dinner. Everyone left food on their plate, except me, I ate all I was given. Shocking waste.

    Ilona
    Originally posted by Ilona
    We did have a bit of leftover food after our Christmas dinner as we don't like that 'stuffed' feeling.

    I mixed it all together and ate it as a very thick soup on 27th December, it was yummy!

    Pollycat, I've a friend whose worse then that. She goes through her freezer and anything older then 3 months gets binned

    I told her to bin it my direction. She thinks I'm joking
    Originally posted by usernameisvalid
    Lordy! Lordy!

    I have to confess to finding some raw diced beef in my freezer that had been in there since 2015.

    It was fine in a beef, potato, turnip and carrot stew in the slow cooker.
    And we're still here.

    Anywho, I don't understand why people have to throw away food like bread, cheese, leftover meals, soft fruit, vegetables etc., most of that stuff can be frozen when it's close to being past its best and fruit used for smoothies, veg used for soup, cheese grated & used for sauces or garnish, bread for toast etc. Etc.
    Originally posted by kboss2010
    Me neither.
    I buy bread and cheese that is reduced (as long as the bread feels fresh) and put it in the freezer.
    I bought a piece of extra mature cheddar, over 800gms, reduced to 59p and that went straight into the freezer.

    I know Ilona does this too (if she's the lady I'm thinking about).
    In fact, I do believe she has it down to a fine art.
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