Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • kittie
    • By kittie 9th Dec 16, 7:42 AM
    • 10,852Posts
    • 58,585Thanks
    kittie
    The sewing thread
    • #1
    • 9th Dec 16, 7:42 AM
    The sewing thread 9th Dec 16 at 7:42 AM
    We have an active knitters thread on the os board, I always felt that we should have a sewers thread here too, in visible sight. Many many people sew and there are also many learners. I made my first skirt on a treadle singer machine at age 10, many of us oldies were taught sewing at a very early age. The craft died down for many years when cheap clothing shops flooded the high streets but there is a re-awakening and I have grandchildren who are desperate to learn how to sew. I believe that a sewers thread should take equal place with the knitters thread and on this board

    I am still an active sewer, using three machines, overlocker, sewing machine and coverstitch. Even sewing a plain hemmed tablecloth for all day coverage to keep the table nice, using good quality fabric, takes less than two hours and gets lots of good comments, also very practical and made in a light fabric, it brightens that corner of the room

    I am about to teach my 8 year old grand daughter, who is getting a future-proofed real janome sewing machine for christmas. She will obviously have to start with pedal control, forward and backward etc but I can see her making an apron for her mum after half an hour of basics. I have a simple paper pattern ready, the fabric and the notions. We will do simple cutting out of two fabrics, then will sew back to back, pulling the fabric through, there will be no seam edges, or finishing or hems.

    Let`s get this thread going. Join us if you sew, if you want to sew, if you have queries and questions
    Last edited by kittie; 09-12-2016 at 10:17 PM.
Page 3
    • kittie
    • By kittie 11th Dec 16, 3:38 PM
    • 10,852 Posts
    • 58,585 Thanks
    kittie
    I am finding the quilting posts very interesting, what a lovely way to preserve memories of clothing etc. Quilting isn`t for me but that does not stop me being interested in what you are doing and how you do it

    Today I put a wooden tree up, had to change from a green tree, due to circumstances. It had to go on a low round table that has a black top and three beech legs. I thought of putting some felt under the treeto protect the table but have just made a full length red cover for the table. Am so pleased with it, I have used a good lump of bright red stash which had a felt-like feel. Cutting a circle was not so bad using a string from a pivot point. Then I did a single hem using a fancy zig zag stitch. Look very very nice, Cost me nothing except a bit of time. Love sewing when I don`t have to work to my body measurements
    • westcoastscot
    • By westcoastscot 11th Dec 16, 4:13 PM
    • 1,360 Posts
    • 16,682 Thanks
    westcoastscot
    Kittie that sounds lovely!

    Fuddle, applique is really fun - I often do wee bits onto a quilt around memories of the fabric. Have you seen Helen Phillip's blog? Lots of quilty inspiration there :-)

    Something your wee girlies might like - mine used to draw on calico, and I'd stitch the picture, just in plain running stitch - like a redwork type picture. As they got older they'd stitch it themselves - just small squares to add to a quilt.
    Last edited by westcoastscot; 11-12-2016 at 4:15 PM.
    • kittie
    • By kittie 11th Dec 16, 5:00 PM
    • 10,852 Posts
    • 58,585 Thanks
    kittie
    Something your wee girlies might like - mine used to draw on calico, and I'd stitch the picture, just in plain running stitch - like a redwork type picture. As they got older they'd stitch it themselves - just small squares to add to a quilt.
    Originally posted by westcoastscot
    omg I absolutely LOVE that idea. What a fantastic way to make some treasured memories
    • FrugalinShropshire
    • By FrugalinShropshire 11th Dec 16, 5:37 PM
    • 192 Posts
    • 1,730 Thanks
    FrugalinShropshire
    Afternoon all, Fab Thread!
    I am a quilter, but have not had too much time lately and have a couple of half finished quilts. I do the basics for myself such as a wrap around skirt or pjama bottoms but nothing more complicated than that. I did make a gorgeous Liberty Tana Lawn dressing gown in the 80's !
    Proud to be mortgage free
    • thriftwizard
    • By thriftwizard 11th Dec 16, 8:05 PM
    • 2,411 Posts
    • 29,934 Thanks
    thriftwizard
    Evening all! Another fabric addict here... I don't get to stitch as often as I'd like, but that's just as well or no-one would ever get fed round here. I have a big computerised machine (bought secondhand) which is lovely & very capable but sulks quite easily, a Bernina workhorse (though I've lost that to DD1) an overlocker which I'm fairly terrified of but can just about manage, a 1909 Jones treadle which I love very much, and a tiny German long-bobbin handcrank which I've even been known to take camping! If I could only keep one, it would be the treadle every time.

    I do a little light quilting, make small & simple things from reclaimed materials (not always fabric; quite often old maps or wallpaper) to sell, make the odd uncomplicated garment and help DD2 with her dance costumes. I was never taught, having been pushed into the academic stream at school, and would love to do a pattern-cutting course & design my own clothes, being of the short & round persuasion so that hardly anything shop-bought ever fits.

    Looking forward to sharing in everyone's stitching adventures!
    Angie

    Money's just a substitute for time & talent...
    • Living proof
    • By Living proof 12th Dec 16, 9:43 AM
    • 1,194 Posts
    • 7,910 Thanks
    Living proof
    Enthused by this thread I have googled sewing classes in my area and to my amazement found a private class one evening a week for a couple of hours, or once a month all day on a Sunday. I've made contact with the teacher and hope to join a class after February, as I have many commitments up until then. All very exciting!
    Solar Suntellite 250 x16 4kW Afore 3600TL dual 2KW E 2KW W no shade, DN15 March 14
    Mortgage and Debt Free. Unfortunately Pension Free too!
    • maryb
    • By maryb 12th Dec 16, 10:43 AM
    • 3,300 Posts
    • 39,018 Thanks
    maryb
    OOOH! just found this thread!! Thank you Kittie!

    I used to love sewing but rarely had much time for it when I was working. I thought I'd have much more time when I retired but I started having a lot of trouble with my eyesight, one problem after another!

    However I have been extraordinarily lucky and my macular problem has spontaneously resolved (thankfully it wasn't macular degeneration, I was due to have an operation but in the end didn't need it). It has taken about 18 months but I can now see better than I could for the last 4 years so am hoping to do more sewing. Although I still swear by my Clover automatic needle threader!!

    My DD has also got into sewing in a big way and has overtaken me in many ways. She started by raiding my stash in her first year at uni to make a quilt for her cold room. Very simple just four inch squares of fabric but it was enough to give her the bug.

    After a year or so I thought she would like to move on to clothesmaking but I knew she would get disheartened if she just bought a pattern and made it up because women's figures have changed so much since the pattern companies last standardised their sizes. I had learned to do a Full Bust Adjustment from the Palmer and Pletsch book Fit for Real People and was stunned at the difference it made. Choosing a pattern size by my high bust measurement rather than my actual bust and then making an adjustment to give the 'girls' the room they needed gave me clothes that fitted! Because when your middle age spreads a bit, your shoulders don't necessarily come out in sympathy like a 1970s trade unionist!

    Anyway I found a course run by Mandy Bengeyfield at Fit2sew in South Croydon. She's a certified Palmer and Pletsch instructor so I bought a course for DD as a present. She loved it and was able to make herself a whole load of shift dresses for work for very little money. Now she tackles all sorts of things and it's a great hobby for her

    Except she raids my supplies. And never puts anything back
    It doesn't matter if you are a glass half full or half empty sort of person. Keep it topped up! Cheers!
    • katkin
    • By katkin 12th Dec 16, 2:44 PM
    • 557 Posts
    • 7,173 Thanks
    katkin
    Thanks for this thread, it is great inspiration.

    I've sewn since a small child, so young I can hardly remember when I took it up. My mum was a huge amateur dressmaker and did brides dresses etc for family and friends. Many memories I have was with my mum at the machine or learning to use a quick pick!

    My machine is out now to make "unique" lined tote shopping bags for Xmas gifts. I've also done a quilted few table runners and matching coaster. There's some amazing fashionable fabrics out there, Amy Butler being one of my favourites.

    Alterations and clothes make it a whole different ball game for me, I really need a pattern even if it is a freebie online one that needs sizing up.

    My next project is making an A-line skirt from some ikea fabric that more used for soft furnishings than clothes! It's a lovely print that will go well with winter knits and boots.


    Do you all think we should have a simple sewing challenge? Make something within so many weeks then post the finished item? Sharing knowledge and tips as we go along?
    Last edited by katkin; 12-12-2016 at 2:46 PM.
    • green_hat778
    • By green_hat778 12th Dec 16, 3:19 PM
    • 19 Posts
    • 45 Thanks
    green_hat778
    Lovely thread!

    I've had a desire to learn to sew my own clothes for a while now, and my mum has recently started to teach me. Together we made one top for me that came out well, since then I've made one very simple top on my own that fits but is a bit uninspiring in terms of fit. It may have been better in a different fabric. I'm three quarters of a way through a second top on my own that I've realised would have looked good on someone 2 sizes smaller, sometime in the mid 70's.

    Still, mum and I came upon a fabric shop that was closing down a while back and we bought about a dozen massive rolls of fabric for £5 a go. Most of it was upholstery fabric, but I did get one lovely roll of something that mysteriously calls itself 'cotton satin'. My three rolls have easily 20m + of fabric on them, so the materials for the two tops cost about a quid each (+60p for a zip that might not be used). Its a learning experience...

    Since starting I've developed a fabric buying habit... I now have a huge stock of fabric I'm scared to use because I'm afraid I'll make something that will be a disaster/wont fit. None of it was terribly expensive in the grand scheme, (but more than my massive rolls) and I'd be sad not to get something wearable from it!

    Will follow this thread with interest
    • maryb
    • By maryb 12th Dec 16, 4:40 PM
    • 3,300 Posts
    • 39,018 Thanks
    maryb
    Careful Green Hat!! SABLE awaits! (Stash Acquired Beyond Life Expectancy)

    Geoff Rosenberg, who exhibits at most of the stitching exhibitions, also has a Travelling Fabric Show. He takes over the Village Hall for a day once a month and lays out bolts and bolts of gorgeous cut price fabric. That man is EVIL! (he's lovely, such a nice man, and you come home barely able to carry all the lovely fabric you have bought)
    It doesn't matter if you are a glass half full or half empty sort of person. Keep it topped up! Cheers!
    • jackyann
    • By jackyann 12th Dec 16, 9:53 PM
    • 3,052 Posts
    • 5,812 Thanks
    jackyann
    I'll start katkin's challenge in the New Year, I have 3 potential projct and am not sure where to begin, but when I decide, I'll post!
    • fuddle
    • By fuddle 12th Dec 16, 10:23 PM
    • 5,726 Posts
    • 87,061 Thanks
    fuddle
    I'd be up for a challenge but I'm not very able yet.

    Maryb, did you say an automatic needle threader I've learned something new today. I'm sorry to read your eyes haven't been playing the game properly but pleased to read they're righting their wrongs now.

    I have 4 rows left to stitch of my top quilt. Some, a fair few most squares don't quite match up but it's so busy it's not easy to tell. I'm quite a perfectionist so a bit shocked at how this is ok and I actually l.o.v.e my quilt top.
    Success.
    It's not always what you see.
    • Franalamadingdong
    • By Franalamadingdong 12th Dec 16, 11:24 PM
    • 328 Posts
    • 3,264 Thanks
    Franalamadingdong
    Fuddle I use frixion pens. To remove the mark I either use the iron, or if particularly idle I use a hairdryer.

    I think I might be one of the younger sewers here. I've made curtains and cushions, quilts and clothes, aprons, bags, pencil cases, purses, jewellery rolls, toys, a tree skirt and an armchair sewing organiser thing. I'm doing an English paper piecing quilt at the moment. No doubt I will hugely regret such an insane undertaking.

    Green hat, you could use your cheap stuff as a muslin, then when you've worked out all the tweaks and changes you need to make to the pattern you can use your good stuff.

    Anyone done any leather work? I've been eyeing some up. I've used the fake stuff, buy I'd love to work with some real leather.
    My mum bought me a machine from the charity shop about 6 or 7 years ago. This broke recently and was such an obscure make I couldn't get a replacement part. I ended up treating myself to a fancy pants machine and I love it. It made such a difference to my sewing! I also have an overlocker, but I've not used this as much as my machine. And now after teaching myself English paper piecing (EPP) last Christmas I use both a little less. Boy is it addictive! I do intersperse the EPP with quicker projects, like the tree skirt, to get a little quick gratification!

    I am 100%, totally and absolutely not at all MSE when it comes to my sewing. If I am going to spend hours and hours of my time on something I won't compromise, it'll be exactly what I want. However, I do find use for scraps. I used some when learning EPP, and the leftovers from the tree skirt made my scrappy wreath. Well meaning people tend to give me mildew stinking scraps, as in 4" x6", of upholstery fabric. I'm not going to use it, and I'm not going to store it with my nice fabric so it can transfer it's stink over! I'm very firm with them saying that others could make better use of it and I won't accept it now Sounds rude but it's - I am polite about it, but some people will not take no for an answer. It's like people who like to ride bikes being given a punctured car tyre and expected to be grateful.
    Nov: £144.48/200 (£55.53 left) Dec: £207.43/200 £7.43 over Jan: £167.33/180 (£12.67 left)
    Feb: £159.95/176 (£16.05 left)
    March Grocery Challenge: £128.78195 (£66.22 left)
    • parsniphead
    • By parsniphead 13th Dec 16, 7:22 AM
    • 2,075 Posts
    • 13,218 Thanks
    parsniphead
    Thanks for starting the thread Kittie. I have sewn for many years and have asked for fabric and patterns for Christmas presents. I also like to draft my own patterns but time is a little short at the moment.

    I have made a puff quilt, a embroidered bean bag and a 50's style mans work shirt as gifts this year. Time for some things for me I think.

    I shall read with interest and post when I can.
    Debts as of 08/07/17 Credit cards £7811 majority on 0%. Car loan £1500 my half. Mortgage £36272 remaining balance (10 yrs 2 mnths remaining - i think not). Emergency fund £500/500
    GAZELLE INTENSE AND GAINING TRACTION
    • parsniphead
    • By parsniphead 13th Dec 16, 7:25 AM
    • 2,075 Posts
    • 13,218 Thanks
    parsniphead
    Fuddle I use frixion pens. To remove the mark I either use the iron, or if particularly idle I use a hairdryer.

    I think I might be one of the younger sewers here. I've made curtains and cushions, quilts and clothes, aprons, bags, pencil cases, purses, jewellery rolls, toys, a tree skirt and an armchair sewing organiser thing. I'm doing an English paper piecing quilt at the moment. No doubt I will hugely regret such an insane undertaking.

    Green hat, you could use your cheap stuff as a muslin, then when you've worked out all the tweaks and changes you need to make to the pattern you can use your good stuff.

    Anyone done any leather work? I've been eyeing some up. I've used the fake stuff, buy I'd love to work with some real leather.
    My mum bought me a machine from the charity shop about 6 or 7 years ago. This broke recently and was such an obscure make I couldn't get a replacement part. I ended up treating myself to a fancy pants machine and I love it. It made such a difference to my sewing! I also have an overlocker, but I've not used this as much as my machine. And now after teaching myself English paper piecing (EPP) last Christmas I use both a little less. Boy is it addictive! I do intersperse the EPP with quicker projects, like the tree skirt, to get a little quick gratification!

    I am 100%, totally and absolutely not at all MSE when it comes to my sewing. If I am going to spend hours and hours of my time on something I won't compromise, it'll be exactly what I want. However, I do find use for scraps. I used some when learning EPP, and the leftovers from the tree skirt made my scrappy wreath. Well meaning people tend to give me mildew stinking scraps, as in 4" x6", of upholstery fabric. I'm not going to use it, and I'm not going to store it with my nice fabric so it can transfer it's stink over! I'm very firm with them saying that others could make better use of it and I won't accept it now Sounds rude but it's - I am polite about it, but some people will not take no for an answer. It's like people who like to ride bikes being given a punctured car tyre and expected to be grateful.
    Originally posted by Franalamadingdong
    I used to teach leatherwork Franalamadingdong so if you have any questions please feel free to ask.
    Debts as of 08/07/17 Credit cards £7811 majority on 0%. Car loan £1500 my half. Mortgage £36272 remaining balance (10 yrs 2 mnths remaining - i think not). Emergency fund £500/500
    GAZELLE INTENSE AND GAINING TRACTION
    • kathrynha
    • By kathrynha 13th Dec 16, 7:49 AM
    • 1,485 Posts
    • 6,812 Thanks
    kathrynha
    Do you all think we should have a simple sewing challenge? Make something within so many weeks then post the finished item? Sharing knowledge and tips as we go along?
    Originally posted by katkin
    I'm up for a challenge, and I have a sewing project that I have been meaning to do for ages.
    I'm a Guide leader and I have a great big pile of neckers (the scarves Guides and Scouts wear round their necks), from lots of camps and special events, so they all have a sentimental value, but just end up in a box. My plan for them is to make a new Guide bag (tote bag) for me, and a plate bag for camps. Using them in a quilting like way. Never done quilting before, but I want to try.
    I won't be starting till after Christmas though.
    Weight loss start date: 3rd January 2017
    Weight loss total: 50.5 lb
    Last updated: 1st August 2017
    • maryb
    • By maryb 13th Dec 16, 9:12 AM
    • 3,300 Posts
    • 39,018 Thanks
    maryb
    Fuddle, this is the needle threader I was talking about
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Clover-Desk-Needle-Threader-Pink/dp/B00172MKO4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1481620077&sr=8-1&keywords=clover+needle+threader

    Worth every penny for me and I think it would also be really good if you are doing some hand sewing where you need to thread a lot of needles - it's so quick
    It doesn't matter if you are a glass half full or half empty sort of person. Keep it topped up! Cheers!
    • thriftwizard
    • By thriftwizard 13th Dec 16, 9:15 AM
    • 2,411 Posts
    • 29,934 Thanks
    thriftwizard
    Whilst I am in utter agreement with Franalamadingdong about little mildewy scraps, I'm usually very happy working with reclaimed fabrics!

    Yesterday evening I made a pair of curtains from one enormous one rescued by a friend who was redecorating a country house after a fire; it's a Colefax & Fowler linen/cotton union and the sort of fabric I could only dream of buying new in any quantity, but just happens to be the exact colour I need for the room I'm currently re-decorating. The other curtain had been badly scorched & was being burnt; my friend asked politely whether he could rescue this one before it went into the bonfire, and was given permission. As the curtains I've made from it are purely decorative, the cotton bump interlining is going into a cot quilt I'm halfway through, and the lining is in my rag bag. Later on I'll be making two cushion/pillow covers from the leftovers. There's already a quilted roman blind at that window in a C&F stripe which contains the same blue, bought as a remnant; I still have some of that too, so two more cushions will be made up in that.

    My living room & hallway curtains are Laura Ashley's Pelham Stripe, four long pairs cut down from two huge pairs bought for £1.50, scrumpled up in a big bin-liner at the local Tip. Now with matching cushions! Not to everybody's taste, obviously, but it really suits the age & style of our house. Originally the two big pairs, made to measure at LA rather than off-the-peg, would have cost well over £1,000, and the fabric itself was in good nick once washed & ironed.

    My very favourite thing to work with is old silk... from time to time, in the course of my business, I'll buy a bundle of old silk saris. Whilst I'll sell most of them on, usually to fashion students at the local uni, one or two of them will inevitably make their way into our own stash. But it's not the easiest stuff to stitch & we go through acres of tissue paper trying to keep it stabilised under the needle, even with a dual-feed machine! However, the softness, drape and flow of the fabric itself are utterly addictive. And don't get me started on old kimonos - Japanese weaves & prints are just to die for!

    So it's horses for courses! We do occasionally buy & use new fabric - we, by the way, is myself and my two DDs - but in the course of what I do (and they help with) we just keep coming across the most beautiful fabrics, lace & other stuff that other people have rejected, usually for a fraction of the cost of buying good stuff new. I'm perfectly happy with other people only using new, though - it leaves all the more for me!
    Angie

    Money's just a substitute for time & talent...
    • maryb
    • By maryb 13th Dec 16, 9:19 AM
    • 3,300 Posts
    • 39,018 Thanks
    maryb
    I've tended to use Vogue/McCall/Butterick/Simplicity patterns up to now and I have a pretty good idea of the adjustments I need to make. Has anyone used Burda patterns very much? Specifically, do they tend to run big or not? I've heard that their trousers fit much better than American patterns.

    I'll be using a paper pattern - I don't think my poor eyes are up to tracing from the magazine!!
    It doesn't matter if you are a glass half full or half empty sort of person. Keep it topped up! Cheers!
    • loocyloo
    • By loocyloo 13th Dec 16, 1:47 PM
    • 251 Posts
    • 1,442 Thanks
    loocyloo

    edited to add: loocyloo that would work fine - if the sides are straight you could shorten the work by cutting the sides and backs all in one piece, sew the two together leaving the shoulders open and turn it through that? Then you'd just need to sew the shoulders up?
    Originally posted by westcoastscot


    THANK YOU! just need to find some time to get going!




    Emminapickle, I always use cheap pillows or cushions for stuffing! the 'real' stuffing is SOOO expensive!


    I'm loving reading about everyones projects and sewing history x
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

19Posts Today

4,242Users online

Martin's Twitter