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  • FIRST POST
    • kittie
    • By kittie 9th Dec 16, 7:42 AM
    • 10,619Posts
    • 56,800Thanks
    kittie
    The sewing thread
    • #1
    • 9th Dec 16, 7:42 AM
    The sewing thread 9th Dec 16 at 7:42 AM
    We have an active knitters thread on the os board, I always felt that we should have a sewers thread here too, in visible sight. Many many people sew and there are also many learners. I made my first skirt on a treadle singer machine at age 10, many of us oldies were taught sewing at a very early age. The craft died down for many years when cheap clothing shops flooded the high streets but there is a re-awakening and I have grandchildren who are desperate to learn how to sew. I believe that a sewers thread should take equal place with the knitters thread and on this board

    I am still an active sewer, using three machines, overlocker, sewing machine and coverstitch. Even sewing a plain hemmed tablecloth for all day coverage to keep the table nice, using good quality fabric, takes less than two hours and gets lots of good comments, also very practical and made in a light fabric, it brightens that corner of the room

    I am about to teach my 8 year old grand daughter, who is getting a future-proofed real janome sewing machine for christmas. She will obviously have to start with pedal control, forward and backward etc but I can see her making an apron for her mum after half an hour of basics. I have a simple paper pattern ready, the fabric and the notions. We will do simple cutting out of two fabrics, then will sew back to back, pulling the fabric through, there will be no seam edges, or finishing or hems.

    Let`s get this thread going. Join us if you sew, if you want to sew, if you have queries and questions
    Last edited by kittie; 09-12-2016 at 10:17 PM.
Page 1
    • VJsmum
    • By VJsmum 9th Dec 16, 7:47 AM
    • 4,652 Posts
    • 66,052 Thanks
    VJsmum
    • #2
    • 9th Dec 16, 7:47 AM
    • #2
    • 9th Dec 16, 7:47 AM
    I read that as sewers as in drains

    I am a bit of a sewer - and have aspirations for quilting. My daughter wanted to borrow my sewing machine but, when i spent a happy evening making some mini christmas stockings the other day, I realised i don't want her to have it as i doubt i'll get it back.

    I have decided to buy her a machine for christmas - there is a nice Brother one, with good reviews for 65 in Hobby craft that I think I'll get her.
    You're out with a friend in the capital, I'm a thousand leagues under the sea
    You're hovering worriedly over your eggs, And I'm pondering trees
    I'm wandering long, And I'm pondering trees
    For you and me
    Guy Garvey
    • kittie
    • By kittie 9th Dec 16, 7:53 AM
    • 10,619 Posts
    • 56,800 Thanks
    kittie
    • #3
    • 9th Dec 16, 7:53 AM
    • #3
    • 9th Dec 16, 7:53 AM
    lol, vsmum, I should have said sewing, oh well, I don`t think I can change it

    We seem to have missed a generation wrt sewing. I have two grown up daughters, one had no interest in sewing and the other has made cushions and bunting. It was quite frustrating not being able to pass skills on but the new generation seem to want to learn, my three grandchildren do want to learn crafts.

    I have never done machine quilting or machine embroidery, so I am open to learning from anyone. I did some hand quilting many years ago with cardboard templates but took me too long
    • jackyann
    • By jackyann 9th Dec 16, 7:56 AM
    • 2,983 Posts
    • 5,541 Thanks
    jackyann
    • #4
    • 9th Dec 16, 7:56 AM
    • #4
    • 9th Dec 16, 7:56 AM
    Thank you!
    I have been a 'sewer' all my life - we used to say 'dressmaking' but that limits it and 'needlework' implies hand sewing only. A lady near here calls herself a 'sewist' - I say that I make things!
    I helped to make my clothes from an early age, and like your lucky grand daughter, made an apron at about 8.
    The summer holiday just before I turned 11, my mother said I should make clothes completely and supervised a smart skirt & 'weskit' outfit (early 60s!. She then said that I should have a 'clothing allowance' and my goodness I learned to stretch it!
    I struggle a bit nowadays with fitting, but have found Michelle Pye's courses (English Couture Company, Leicester) very helpful, and they make a lovely day out.

    Enjoy teaching your grand daughter, and may this be the beginning of a lifetime's sewing!
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 9th Dec 16, 9:03 AM
    • 16,938 Posts
    • 41,165 Thanks
    Pollycat
    • #5
    • 9th Dec 16, 9:03 AM
    • #5
    • 9th Dec 16, 9:03 AM
    We have an active knitters thread on the os board, I always felt that we should have a sewers thread here too, in visible sight. Many many people sew and there are also many learners. I made my first skirt on a treadle singer machine at age 10, many of us oldies were taught sewing at a very early age. The craft died down for many years when cheap clothing shops flooded the high streets but there is a re-awakening and I have grandchildren who are desperate to learn how to sew. I believe that a sewers thread should take equal place with the knitters thread and on this board

    I am still an active sewer, using three machines, overlocker, sewing machine and coverstitch. Even sewing a plain hemmed tablecloth for all day coverage to keep the table nice, using good quality fabric, takes less than two hours and gets lots of good comments, also very practical and made in a light fabric, it brightens that corner of the room

    I am about to teach my 8 year old grand daughter, who is getting a future-proofed real janome sewing machine for christmas. She will obviously have to start with pedal control, forward and backward etc but I can see her making an apron for her mum after half an hour of basics. I have a simple paper pattern ready, the fabric and the notions. We will do simple cutting out of two fabrics, then will sew back to back, pulling the fabric through, there will be no seam edges, or finishing or hems.

    Let`s get this thread going. Join us if you sew, if you want to sew, if you have queries and questions
    Originally posted by kittie
    It's a great skill to have, Kittie.

    My Nan taught me to sew on her old treadle machine and I made all my own clothes probably from the age of 15.
    We used to have wonderful fabric stalls on our market but they have sadly disappeared.
    My friend is also a sewist - the first thing we do when out shopping is feel the fabric of a dress, skirt or top then scrunch it to see if it creases.

    I made my first wedding dress, not a traditional one but my own style, and bridesmaid dresses.

    As you say, with the coming of cheap shops and also charity shops, I've not done much sewing for a lot of years but being able to sew means I can buy something from a charity shop and not worry about the length.
    I had my machine out yesterday to shorten some white linen M&S trousers that I bought for 1 from a charity shop.
    • kathrynha
    • By kathrynha 9th Dec 16, 9:20 AM
    • 1,249 Posts
    • 5,183 Thanks
    kathrynha
    • #6
    • 9th Dec 16, 9:20 AM
    • #6
    • 9th Dec 16, 9:20 AM
    I sew a little. Not great at it but can do it.

    I learnt hand sewing at about 4, and first used a machine at about 10.
    I'm not a natural sewer, and but I like to try. I have made cushions and curtains successfully. Would love to be able to make clothes, but have so far only made dress-up costumes for my daughter. Made her a lovely Elsa (from Frozen) dress a few years back.

    For making clothes for me I don't really know how to start. I'm a plus size, so patterns are very limited, and as I vary by 4 dress sizes between my chest, waist and hips, a pattern wouldn't fit all over. When I make for my daughter I put it on her and pin it to her shape, and I think the ability to do that is the key to successful dressmaking, so I feel I need a tailors dummy, but to get one to suit my body shape is stupidly expensive
    Weight loss start date: 3rd January 2017
    Weight loss total: 41 lb
    Last updated: 23rd May 2017
    • kittie
    • By kittie 9th Dec 16, 9:41 AM
    • 10,619 Posts
    • 56,800 Thanks
    kittie
    • #7
    • 9th Dec 16, 9:41 AM
    • #7
    • 9th Dec 16, 9:41 AM
    we are off!! up and running!!

    I am a plus size too kathrynha and used to be 5`, now shorter and everything has gone south. Shop bought clothes just do not fit. I had a model and kept it under the stairs for mny years, then I realised that I could make it my shape. I got wadding and a stretchy tube type interlock fabric. Carefully took my measurements and started padding, a bit at a time, used a curved needle and strong thread.. Put my bra on her and stuffed that, not perky unfortunately but realistic. This was a very slow process and not one that invited me to carry on but carry on I did. I pretty well got me and then made a slip over stretchy interlock top and put a zip in the back, ok the body does change, hence the zip. Put black tape around to mark waist, hips and bust and covered the lot in a loose pillow case. It works when I am making something that I need to fit against me, especially shoulder width etc and is very good when knitting a top down fitted shaped jumper

    ten years ago I made a lovely buttoned blouse, put it on and realised that the darts finished way up too high. There are ways and means of getting around bust problems, starting with simple darts at the shoulder and waist but you can get a pattern to fit properly by doing a full bust adjustment. I had never heard of this until ten years ago, never having needed to allow for my age. There is a lot of advice on line and especially via craftsy online classes and I bought many classes when on special offer. I also have a lot of american patterns, which are especially drafted for the shorter fuller figure

    This is a fab american sewing forum, which helped to get me going again after a long gap
    http://artisanssquare.com/sg/index.php
    Last edited by kittie; 09-12-2016 at 9:43 AM.
    • fuddle
    • By fuddle 9th Dec 16, 9:53 AM
    • 5,609 Posts
    • 85,504 Thanks
    fuddle
    • #8
    • 9th Dec 16, 9:53 AM
    • #8
    • 9th Dec 16, 9:53 AM
    Perfect timing Kittie.

    I'm about to embark on row 3 of my first patch work quilt. I have put off doing it for years but I'm surprised at how well I'm managing.

    I have stumbled upon a problem though. I'm still on the John Lewis basic mini machine and I don't think I can actually quilt the quilt so will have to ask around to use a full size machine when I'm ready and look to invest in a proper machine for the future.

    My girls both have an interest in sewing. My 8 year old has cut up a jumper of hers to make her teddy a jumper for Christmas. Every time I get my machine out I inspire one of the kiddlers to have a go.

    Going forward I intend to make my own clothes and did try following a skirt pattern in the summer but I failed. I'm very much at the beginner stage and have been for years.

    Do you have your machines out on show all the time and if not where do you store them?

    You can change the title kittie. I think it will show up if you go to edit the first post... I think

    • Living proof
    • By Living proof 9th Dec 16, 10:28 AM
    • 1,205 Posts
    • 7,883 Thanks
    Living proof
    • #9
    • 9th Dec 16, 10:28 AM
    • #9
    • 9th Dec 16, 10:28 AM
    As Fuddle has said, perfect timing.

    I learnt to sew from an early age, making myself a lined quilted anorak when about 12. At school we had to make a hideous blouse and dress, in fabric chosen by our mums which could have put me off for life.

    I made several really gorgeous party-type dresses for my daughter over the years and a lot of basic trousers, etc. but for many years the sewing machine has sat unloved under a bed in the spare room. I have recently been planning to transfer all my sewing equipment into my study where I currently work. State retirement age looms close now in November and I haven't exactly decided when the day will finally come, but I will have the choice at least to stop working in just a few months.

    I used to go to day classes run by the local Adult Education Authority but these long ago got either cut completely or became so expensive that only people on benefit could afford to go! It was a shame as they ran a pattern-making class which would benefit all of us who are not a perfect proportioned size. Added to the fact that fabric shops are like hens' teeth and clothes in general have been up to now ridiculously cheap, it's not been worthwhile making items. In fact I think being able to alter clothes is probably more pertinent for me and being able to make soft furnishings as well.

    I look forward to reading all the exciting projects from all you sewistas until I finally get the time to start my own.
    Solar Suntellite 250 x16 4kW Afore 3600TL dual 2KW E 2KW W no shade, DN15 March 14
    Mortgage and Debt Free. Unfortunately Pension Free too!
    • srn
    • By srn 9th Dec 16, 10:34 AM
    • 73 Posts
    • 222 Thanks
    srn
    Hi,

    Great new thread.
    I too learned to sew as a child, made all of my own clothes in my teens, but stopped as clothes became cheaper and life, marriage and children got in the way. I have always had a sewing machine for simple things like hems, curtains, cushion covers etc. However when I retired I decided to take up quilting but my husband persuaded me to buy a hugely expensive sewing machine that embroiders as well - WOW. I have a new hobby, it is wonderful, I can even quilt on it! I have attached a couple of photos (hopefully) of two quilts I have just finished, made from the bunting I made for my son's wedding in July. The photos of them are of them not finished, but I finished them both with some deep purple binding and I am quite proud of them.
    http://s591.photobucket.com/user/srnorth1/library/Quilting?sort=3&page=1
    I am now working on some Christmas wall hangings.
    • kathrynha
    • By kathrynha 9th Dec 16, 10:36 AM
    • 1,249 Posts
    • 5,183 Thanks
    kathrynha
    I am a plus size too kathrynha and used to be 5`, now shorter and everything has gone south. Shop bought clothes just do not fit. I had a model and kept it under the stairs for mny years, then I realised that I could make it my shape. I got wadding and a stretchy tube type interlock fabric. Carefully took my measurements and started padding, a bit at a time, used a curved needle and strong thread.. Put my bra on her and stuffed that, not perky unfortunately but realistic. This was a very slow process and not one that invited me to carry on but carry on I did. I pretty well got me and then made a slip over stretchy interlock top and put a zip in the back, ok the body does change, hence the zip. Put black tape around to mark waist, hips and bust and covered the lot in a loose pillow case. It works when I am making something that I need to fit against me, especially shoulder width etc and is very good when knitting a top down fitted shaped jumper
    Originally posted by kittie
    Thanks Kittie, that's really helpful. I will have to see if I can manage to make something similar
    Weight loss start date: 3rd January 2017
    Weight loss total: 41 lb
    Last updated: 23rd May 2017
    • Emm-in-a-pickle
    • By Emm-in-a-pickle 9th Dec 16, 11:33 AM
    • 1,598 Posts
    • 8,226 Thanks
    Emm-in-a-pickle
    Thankyou Kittie! It`s really great to see this thread on the OS board - there is another thread tucked away somewhere where nobody seems to find it and post, so I hope the forum team won`t move this.
    WHAT could be more truly OS Moneysaving than folks making something out of something else, altering charity shop bargains to fit, using up fabric remnants to make things, and teaching the youngsters to enjoy sewing, passing on a great life skill!?

    I too learned to sew when i was 10, on an old treadle when my mum had a sore knee and taught me so I could help her with curtains - simple stuff first then anything and everything. I made all mine and the kids clothes, my daughter had a doll that always had clothes to match her new dresses, made from the scraps!
    I lapsed for years when the kids grew up, I was working full time and feeling less creative, but when I semi-retired last year I got back into it and I am just LOVING IT!

    My daughter had no inclination to sew, nor does my eldest granddaughter, but my youngest granddaughters (9 and 10) are eager. They have had a few goes on my machine (Brother Industrial straight-stitch) and made their own pencil cases for September. - this is a great project imho, lots of scope to use small remnants and recycled zips!
    My daughter said they were still very keen so I`ve bought them a new Brother LS14 between them for Christmas. (I have one of these as well now, slower than by big beastie but ideal for starters and it`s portable. VJ` mum, sounds like you`re looking at the same one, I reckon it`s going to be perfect for my girls and it`s a great price too.
    I have some projects lined up to help them with - flannelette remnants for pillowcases, in gorgeous pink and lilac (I remember feeling SO clever getting the envelope bit right!) and linen aprons for their big brother and dad, a couple of nice fabric shopping bags, and some blingy fabric pieces for dressing-up. I`m really exited about it.
    • csarina2
    • By csarina2 9th Dec 16, 11:47 AM
    • 1,500 Posts
    • 13,273 Thanks
    csarina2
    My grandmother was a tailoress and could make suits etc by just laying out the fabric and chalking it. She worked from home and there were often ladies and gentlemen coming for fittings. She made my uncle a morning suit for his wedding.

    She worked on a treadle machine, my grandfather bought it for her as a wedding present. When they married she gave up her job working for the tailor she had been apprenticed to.

    She made all my clothes including my school uniform, the only things that were bought was my gaberdine raincoat and school hat.

    In later years my mother took up sewing, she did make a couple of outfits, one for my wedding.

    I started sewing myself when my eldest daughter was born, I borrowed my mothers sewing machine to make nighties for her. I also made a christening robe which was worn by her and her brother. That subsequently was lent to someone and it was never returned. I made another robe when I was expecting my youngest daughter and it has done sterling work for my two youngest has been lent out several times, used for my grand daughter, and now resides with my eldest daughter.

    I made lots of clothes for my children and myself, I did make a shirt for my husband, it was ok, but not perfect. I never attempted to make him trousers though.

    Through the years I have always had a sewing machine. Indeed I worked for what is now Janome and bought their first computerised machine. I am still a Janome girl, but no longer make clothes, I am into Patchwork and quilting and have been for the past 25 years. Just now I am making a baby quilt for a great grandchild expected in March

    I have 3 machines, one is a fairly basic Elna which is made by Janome, a computerised Atelier which has a big harp to get a quilt under and a Janome 500 embroidery machine. I have not had a chance to use the embroidery machine much but it will be getting a real work out in the next 12 months.

    I have a sewing room now but have worked in the corners of various bedrooms, on the kitchen table and also in the sitting room.

    There are quite a few sites on the internet that deal with patchwork and quilting. One of the best is MSQC.com Jenny Doan shows a different quilt block every friday. You can also find the videos on You Tube; There is also a useful forum on the site. Craftsy have classes which you can download. There is another site I think its the National Quilting site. Cannot just remember it. I will have a look and post the URL later.

    Thats enough to be going on with. Just as a foot note I won first prize and best in show at our local village show with a quilt I made.

    I have a blog which is based around our village but there is a page on there with a majority of my quilts on. If you PM me I will send you the link.

    Time to go we are off to the over 60's Christmas Lunch.
    Last edited by csarina2; 09-12-2016 at 11:50 AM.
    • Callie22
    • By Callie22 9th Dec 16, 11:53 AM
    • 2,838 Posts
    • 7,557 Thanks
    Callie22
    I love sewing but I'm mainly a hand-sewer - machines have always been a bit of a mystery to me. I've recently been given an old Bernina machine so I'm determined to learn, my local sewing shop runs beginner's machine sewing courses and I'm very tempted to sign up for the one starting in January. They do a dressmaking course too which I'm also thinking about. I'm one of those people that benefits from a bit of tailoring () and it'd be great to learn how to do this properly.
    • jackyann
    • By jackyann 9th Dec 16, 12:56 PM
    • 2,983 Posts
    • 5,541 Thanks
    jackyann
    I was wondering about cashmerette patterns,as they seem expensive, but was recommended them, and have found them excellent!
    They also remind me of the old type of patterns that last and last.
    • Proxima Centauri
    • By Proxima Centauri 9th Dec 16, 1:44 PM
    • 942 Posts
    • 1,661 Thanks
    Proxima Centauri
    Great thread

    I love sewing. I usually do crafts more than sewing clothes or larger items, but it would be great to learn to sew those things as well. I love the Sewing Bee when it's on (one of the few things that's worth watching on telly!)

    I am about to teach my 8 year old grand daughter, who is getting a future-proofed real janome sewing machine for christmas.
    Originally posted by kittie
    My 8 year old nephew has also said he wants to learn to sew. I don't think I learned to use a sewing machine until I was secondary school age but he's quite good with his hands, loves doing 3D puzzles, etc, so maybe he'd get on ok with the machine, supervised of course!
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 9th Dec 16, 1:52 PM
    • 58,692 Posts
    • 338,033 Thanks
    PasturesNew
    I can't sew. I changed schools after 2 years so missed it; first one started it in the 3rd year, second school did it in years 1-2. I then "chose" it in year 4 for O level .... did it for about a term and was then "thrown out" for not having done it before, when everybody else had already done the basics.

    I'd like to be able to sew, but to go from nothing to being able to produce anything worthwhile would be cost prohibitive.

    I'd probably be most likely to use any "skill" to adjust clothing as nothing ever fits me, so I don't buy many clothes as I'm an odd shape/size.
    • TheScarletPixie
    • By TheScarletPixie 9th Dec 16, 1:54 PM
    • 39 Posts
    • 263 Thanks
    TheScarletPixie
    What a great thread :-)

    My sewing journey started when I was about 5, my Grandparents bought me a purple suede purse kit to sew for Xmas and that was the start.... I hand stitched all sorts of clothes for my dolls - they probably looked awful but I was proud of them. My Nana and Auntie started to teach me to sew and then when I was 8 I got my first real sewing machine, a Jones hand machine and never looked back. When we started sewing at school I was way ahead and the teacher let me get on with my own thing.

    I call myself a seamstress and I make all sorts from corsets to cushions and everything in between. Some years ago I took a millinery course and so do a bit of that from time to time. There's always more to learn and I'd like to have a go a machine embroidery when I get some time maybe next year.
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 9th Dec 16, 2:13 PM
    • 16,938 Posts
    • 41,165 Thanks
    Pollycat
    I read that as sewers as in drains
    Originally posted by VJsmum
    Now you've done it!
    Every time I look at the title of this thread, it makes me smile.

    And I also read it as 'drains' now.
    • t14cy t
    • By t14cy t 9th Dec 16, 2:18 PM
    • 978 Posts
    • 6,292 Thanks
    t14cy t
    i read it as sewers ie drains too!! xx
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