Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • westworldfan1
    • By westworldfan1 17th Mar 17, 6:20 AM
    • 5Posts
    • 3Thanks
    westworldfan1
    Support Group/Condition improving
    • #1
    • 17th Mar 17, 6:20 AM
    Support Group/Condition improving 17th Mar 17 at 6:20 AM
    Hello, I wrote here back in November regarding the improvement of my condition. Basically, I was awarded the Support Group without a face to face assessment. My Clinical Psychologist sent a couple of letters to them before my award. My condition has improved since then, I am able to do things I couldn't do before the assessment. Not quite 100%, but getting there.

    My question is, do I inform them of this? I've been looking online and can't seem to find an answer. I don't want to the whole process of waiting/going to an assessment to start up again because it was very stressful the last around but I also don't want to be on the wrong side of the DWP.

    Thank you for your time
Page 1
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 17th Mar 17, 6:52 AM
    • 3,223 Posts
    • 3,274 Thanks
    TELLIT01
    • #2
    • 17th Mar 17, 6:52 AM
    • #2
    • 17th Mar 17, 6:52 AM
    You really need to have a conversation with your doctor and the clinical psychologist about this. Although you are improving, could attempting to get back into work too quickly still have a detrimental effect on your wellbeing?
    You can voluntarily attend sessions designed to get you back to work when in the Support Group, and that may be the better way forward.
    • Majorchance
    • By Majorchance 19th Mar 17, 5:34 AM
    • 7 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Majorchance
    • #3
    • 19th Mar 17, 5:34 AM
    • #3
    • 19th Mar 17, 5:34 AM
    I always thought the support group was paid for life and that you're condition would not improve what's why people get place in that
    • poppy12345
    • By poppy12345 19th Mar 17, 6:11 AM
    • 701 Posts
    • 545 Thanks
    poppy12345
    • #4
    • 19th Mar 17, 6:11 AM
    • #4
    • 19th Mar 17, 6:11 AM
    I always thought the support group was paid for life and that you're condition would not improve what's why people get place in that
    Originally posted by Majorchance
    Sorry you're wrong on this. It may sometime in the future for those with certain conditions but for now it's certainly not for life.
    • tomtom256
    • By tomtom256 19th Mar 17, 6:34 AM
    • 780 Posts
    • 1,446 Thanks
    tomtom256
    • #5
    • 19th Mar 17, 6:34 AM
    • #5
    • 19th Mar 17, 6:34 AM
    By virtue that you believe you have improved, this is classed as a change in circumstances, as such you need to notify this change to the DWP to ensure you are still eligible for the support group.
    • Tommo1980
    • By Tommo1980 19th Mar 17, 9:14 AM
    • 274 Posts
    • 341 Thanks
    Tommo1980
    • #6
    • 19th Mar 17, 9:14 AM
    • #6
    • 19th Mar 17, 9:14 AM
    As TELLIT01 said, you should do so under the advisement of your DR.

    Mental health conditions fluctuate over time. It is a good idea to have the unbiased view of a professional as to how significantly you have improved, before making decisions that could seriously impact your life.

    Tom
    • Penitent
    • By Penitent 19th Mar 17, 10:12 AM
    • 302 Posts
    • 773 Thanks
    Penitent
    • #7
    • 19th Mar 17, 10:12 AM
    • #7
    • 19th Mar 17, 10:12 AM
    I always thought the support group was paid for life and that you're condition would not improve what's why people get place in that
    Originally posted by Majorchance
    Entry into the support group is based on a list of criteria that many feel have been badly chosen in terms of ability to undertake training or return to work.

    Someone with a degenerative condition that will only worsen would be placed in the WRAG if they did not yet meet the support group criteria and they would be expected to go to meetings/classes to make them more employable, despite the fact that there is no realistic prospect of them ever going back to work.

    IIRC, a visually impaired person who reads Braille would go into the WRAG, but someone who cannot read Braille would go into the support group. They're both equally impaired and it's not like there's a lot of jobs out there where being able to read Braille would make a difference, yet someone decided that the Braille-reader should undergo preparations to re-enter the workforce and the non-Braille reader should not.

    The support group certainly isn't just for permanent conditions and those in that group will still undergo reassessment. I believe being at a certain stage of pregnancy will allow you to move from the WRAG into the support group (but you'd need to move back again once you've popped).
    • nannytone
    • By nannytone 19th Mar 17, 12:31 PM
    • 11,872 Posts
    • 17,483 Thanks
    nannytone
    • #8
    • 19th Mar 17, 12:31 PM
    • #8
    • 19th Mar 17, 12:31 PM
    its more than being visually impaired, as visual field is the main criteria for impairment.
    you can have no peripheral sight at all but have perfect central vision.

    entry into the support group is ( using all applicable aids)
    cannot read 16 point print and cannot read braille.

    i agree with the sentiment though as braille readers aren't in high demand
    • Muttleythefrog
    • By Muttleythefrog 19th Mar 17, 12:50 PM
    • 9,091 Posts
    • 17,070 Thanks
    Muttleythefrog
    • #9
    • 19th Mar 17, 12:50 PM
    • #9
    • 19th Mar 17, 12:50 PM
    I always thought the support group was paid for life and that you're condition would not improve what's why people get place in that
    Originally posted by Majorchance
    Unfortunately that may be the tabloid headline and government claim.. but the two groups for ESA do not determine whether you have a condition that will or will not improve... the only exception is probably in cases of terminal illness. The claim that WRAG is for those who eventually will return to work (or similar) is also technically baseless but commonly made out there in media.
    "Do not attribute to conspiracy what can adequately be explained by incompetence" - rogerblack
    • Penitent
    • By Penitent 19th Mar 17, 1:06 PM
    • 302 Posts
    • 773 Thanks
    Penitent
    its more than being visually impaired, as visual field is the main criteria for impairment.
    you can have no peripheral sight at all but have perfect central vision.

    entry into the support group is ( using all applicable aids)
    cannot read 16 point print and cannot read braille.

    i agree with the sentiment though as braille readers aren't in high demand
    Originally posted by nannytone
    I'm sorry, I'm not sure what the correct terminology is. I thought that many don't like being called blind or feel the term excludes those who still have limited sight, so visually impaired was now used instead. Is there a better term?
    • nannytone
    • By nannytone 19th Mar 17, 2:01 PM
    • 11,872 Posts
    • 17,483 Thanks
    nannytone
    i don't mind the term blind personally but i know others can be a bit precious about it

    the terminology is
    sight impaired + partially sighted
    severely sight impaired + blind.

    but that in itself is a minefield, as being registered blind doesn't mean without sight, but usually means complete loss of visual field ( peripheral vision) and very limited central vision.

    i met the criteria for 'blind' in 1996, uet at the time i thought i could see fairly well
    its only in the last 4 or 5 years that i haven't been able to see enough to read or recognise faces.
    i do have some sight but it doesn't make a whole lot of sense
    • Penitent
    • By Penitent 19th Mar 17, 3:37 PM
    • 302 Posts
    • 773 Thanks
    Penitent
    Oh, dear. Do you think we could all just come to an agreement to simplify things? You can be eye disabled, the bloke in the wheelchair can be leg disabled and I'll be brain disabled.

    westworldfan1 - Sorry, I'm derailing a bit. The criteria used to assess you are supposed to take into account whether you can do something reliably, not just if you can do it at all. If you're still unable to do the things reliably, then I'd argue you still qualify under the same criteria.

    I agree with TELLIT01 and Tommo regarding discussing this with your doctor before you do anything. If they agree, maybe you could try doing a few hours work or volunteering to see how it goes?

    Edit:
    You know, I think I've read your post wrongly. Is it more that you've improved in some ways but are still very ill in other ways and are concerned that the improvements will lead to assessment > WRAG > work before you're ready? If that's the case, ignore the bit about working/volunteering.
    Last edited by Penitent; 19-03-2017 at 4:11 PM.
    • westworldfan1
    • By westworldfan1 20th Mar 17, 7:26 AM
    • 5 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    westworldfan1
    What makes this complicated is that I didn't have an assessment (or fill in a ESA50 form, I was too ill to even do it then) so all the DWP has regarding my condition are the letters sent by my Clinical Psychologist. Reading other posts on this forum, I realise that I am incredibly fortunate.

    Penitent - Yes, that's the case. I'm not quite ready yet but what I don't want to happen is be accused of something like fraud because of the improvements I've made since that last letter was sent to the DWP. Perhaps I'm being paranoid but watching those shows on Benefit Fraud does not help, that's what spurred this question.

    I'm going to have to think about this and make a decision. Thank you for the responses.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

1,038Posts Today

5,517Users online

Martin's Twitter