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  • FIRST POST
    • StevenB12
    • By StevenB12 13th Nov 17, 8:37 AM
    • 37Posts
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    StevenB12
    Leaving new jobs early?
    • #1
    • 13th Nov 17, 8:37 AM
    Leaving new jobs early? 13th Nov 17 at 8:37 AM
    Morning all,

    I was having a think about this the other day since I have recently just changed jobs, where do you draw the line on how long you should be in a job for after joining, in terms of if you didn't enjoy it, would you leave straight away?

    I've seen a lot of opinions on this one, I'm not one for trying to jump ship onto better things as soon as something comes up, but recently I've been angling more towards that way with more financial commitments now, mortgage etc.

    Example being -

    Left school at 16, worked for my local council for 6 years, left for better money to an engineering company, stayed 2 years, left to a drainage engineering job for better money, stayed 1 year, joined this company for better money and working hours..., but I'm still looking on Indeed etc and thinking I can do that, it's more money.

    Do you draw a line on how many jobs you would see yourself having or constantly chasing money and moving on to other jobs etc?
Page 1
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 13th Nov 17, 9:21 AM
    • 4,126 Posts
    • 4,254 Thanks
    TELLIT01
    • #2
    • 13th Nov 17, 9:21 AM
    • #2
    • 13th Nov 17, 9:21 AM
    Chasing money has never been the main driver for me. I do understand however that people need to earn enough to live on, and everybody's needs are different.
    You don't say how long you've been in your current job, but I think you do run the risk of being viewed as a job-hopper if you continue the pattern of shorter and shorter times in a job.
    • StevenB12
    • By StevenB12 13th Nov 17, 9:33 AM
    • 37 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    StevenB12
    • #3
    • 13th Nov 17, 9:33 AM
    • #3
    • 13th Nov 17, 9:33 AM
    I think the problem is that once I get settled into a job there always seems to be something that crops up that outcomes to a monthly bill that in turn ends up needing more money sadly. I think the one positive that doing about 4 jobs it has gave me a lot of experience to be able to go into a few jobs at the least.
    • Sanne
    • By Sanne 13th Nov 17, 10:05 AM
    • 340 Posts
    • 307 Thanks
    Sanne
    • #4
    • 13th Nov 17, 10:05 AM
    • #4
    • 13th Nov 17, 10:05 AM
    I've always - so far - chosen jobs based on career progression and not necessarily money, though it's obviously playing a role (and was more so in my first jobs).

    First job - just under two years, I knew it wouldn't be a forever job as it was too junior with no progression.

    Went on to my second job, could have got higher paid ones (by about £5k) but chose this as it was an amazing opportunity/career step.

    Stayed for four years and got fed up, the company was taking the mickey by then. Moved to job number three, again more money but also a good career move.

    Absolutely hated the environment and moved on after about 1.5 years - had a three months notice period and was picky, otherwise I would have been out earlier.

    Next job was a big pay jump again even though I hadn't looked for it - stayed for not even 1.5 years, then came a departmental re-structure. Was offered a too junior role in exchange for my job so left. Chose a job with a small pay cut as I really liked the sound and the company, there were higher paying roles around but really just want a job I can be happy in now and stay for a while - I have huge levels of autonomy, there may be career progression and it's generally a nice company to work for.

    If you have posted your entire job history I gather you're in your mid-twenties - I found (and have heard the same from others) that the focus changes a bit later - it's not so much about the money anymore (yes, of course it needs to pay the bills) but other factors get much more important.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 13th Nov 17, 10:06 AM
    • 30,307 Posts
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    getmore4less
    • #5
    • 13th Nov 17, 10:06 AM
    • #5
    • 13th Nov 17, 10:06 AM
    Your problem may be you are just spending the new higher income, a very common problem, spending ahead of the earning curve and also borrowing to pay for stuff rather than saving.

    With the job moves it helps to identify more than money to progress, professional development new skills so you can grow the salary in the new job for a year or two at least then if the growth dries up then look.
    • StevenB12
    • By StevenB12 13th Nov 17, 10:10 AM
    • 37 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    StevenB12
    • #6
    • 13th Nov 17, 10:10 AM
    • #6
    • 13th Nov 17, 10:10 AM
    26, well done haha

    Yeah when I first started work I had been left school about 4 days before I went into my first job and I loved it, started off doing the basics and progressed fairly high up, as did the money, but my local council as a whole went into massive debt and there were huge job cuts across the whole board, so I got out before it came to that.

    after that the jobs have been good but I usually feel after a while I've gone as far as I will get with them personally, most have promised career progression that has never come etc, as in the job I'm doing now, he basically outlined the chances of progression as in moving up weren't there as it's a very small company, the money goes up but you remain at the same level, and after about 5 or so years he is looking to hand the company over.
    • StevenB12
    • By StevenB12 13th Nov 17, 10:14 AM
    • 37 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    StevenB12
    • #7
    • 13th Nov 17, 10:14 AM
    • #7
    • 13th Nov 17, 10:14 AM
    Na most of any extra income I end up getting in, goes out on necessities rather than needs. In my current and last job I had to save up for a deposit for a house etc which was taking a big chunk of my monthly income, this was on top of rent,shopping,bills etc. Going into the job I'm in now the extra finance goes aside for emergency money and a bit extra towards the house, once the house comes around it's probably going to end up looking again to ensure that there's no struggles from month to month.

    In the career I've got, and even previous it's all been construction/engineering based mainly, progression in these roles usually comes after years and years of experience in multiple roles rather than just the one.
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 13th Nov 17, 10:20 AM
    • 60,731 Posts
    • 354,994 Thanks
    PasturesNew
    • #8
    • 13th Nov 17, 10:20 AM
    • #8
    • 13th Nov 17, 10:20 AM
    There is no answer that's right for all.

    If you're looking at other jobs you're not settled/happy, so if you see another that pays more money it seems daft not to go for it ... after all, if you don't like that one either at least you're paid more money while looking for the next job
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 13th Nov 17, 4:10 PM
    • 9,932 Posts
    • 7,998 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    • #9
    • 13th Nov 17, 4:10 PM
    • #9
    • 13th Nov 17, 4:10 PM
    How does your industry view frequent job changes at your particular level? Not staying anywhere more than 2 yrs can be seen as a negative by many prospective employers (I am ignoring the council employment as that was several jobs ago).
    • keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    • By keepcalmandstayoutofdebt 14th Nov 17, 7:40 PM
    • 2,918 Posts
    • 1,513 Thanks
    keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    Maybe it is to tempting to be taken away more today, then ever before.

    I can't imagine 20 years ago there was this bother, when the net was just not so easily available with new jobs being uploaded every day to be enticed away.

    Anyway, perhaps the people who need long term jobs are the less-able and fortunate - only today I was reminded how lucky I am to be able-bodied to move about, whereas others maybe less so and so understandably they need the security.
    Last edited by keepcalmandstayoutofdebt; 14-11-2017 at 7:40 PM. Reason: .
    "If you are caught in a rainstorm, once you accept that you'll receive a soaking, the only thing left to do is enjoy the walk"
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