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  • FIRST POST
    • t33
    • By t33 9th Aug 17, 7:35 PM
    • 30Posts
    • 2Thanks
    t33
    wild camping
    • #1
    • 9th Aug 17, 7:35 PM
    wild camping 9th Aug 17 at 7:35 PM
    Hi
    I guess this strictly should be on the UK holidays bit but I thought perhaps I'd try here what with the preppers and OS attitudes that seem to prevail here and is often my own approach to life (also, though I don't post much, I do think it's the nicest part of the forum).

    I'm newish to Scotland (Edinburgh) and hear people talk of going wild camping and it sounds very appealing and hopefully inexpensive and 'earthy' if you see what I mean. Done some research and looked at the various websites that are aimed at WC and like the idea of it.

    I haven't been camping in centuries so wondering if anyone could give a bit of an 'essentials list' apart from the obvious (tent!) and good sources for kit - I don't have anything so far, though can borrow bits, but want to start fairly inexpensively just in case it's a flash in the pan! I'm thinking of weekends away, travelling by car, setting up and exploring the area, there are two of us, adults.

    Also any recommendations of where to go for novices would be nice.

    Thanks.
Page 1
    • elf06
    • By elf06 9th Aug 17, 8:37 PM
    • 1,507 Posts
    • 14,975 Thanks
    elf06
    • #2
    • 9th Aug 17, 8:37 PM
    • #2
    • 9th Aug 17, 8:37 PM
    I'm over on the west coast. Great places over here so long as you can cope with (or be prepared for) the midges.
    We wild camp a fair bit and have just done the NC500 (although that was in the back of a van lol)
    I'll try and think of what you need. Baby wipes are a must. I'll be back once I've thought of a list
    Emma

    Aug GC - £88.17/£130
    NSD - target 18 days, so far 5!!
    • caronc
    • By caronc 9th Aug 17, 8:58 PM
    • 2,062 Posts
    • 14,002 Thanks
    caronc
    • #3
    • 9th Aug 17, 8:58 PM
    • #3
    • 9th Aug 17, 8:58 PM
    Midge spray, baby wipes, midge spray, baby wipes, things to eat that just need water added or not much heating up, midge spray, a spade/loo roll, windproof lighter, water, lots of booze. Plenty of changes of clothes so if you can layer up if you get cold or change if damp. Might be worth borrowing some kit if you can, see how you get on and take from there
    April GC £150/£160, May GC £150/£150, June GC £117/£120, July £185/£170, August £89/£120
    • caronc
    • By caronc 9th Aug 17, 9:00 PM
    • 2,062 Posts
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    caronc
    • #4
    • 9th Aug 17, 9:00 PM
    • #4
    • 9th Aug 17, 9:00 PM
    On places to go try somewhere that is not to far from civilisation at first so you can easily beat a retreat if it's not for you.
    April GC £150/£160, May GC £150/£150, June GC £117/£120, July £185/£170, August £89/£120
    • karcher
    • By karcher 9th Aug 17, 9:06 PM
    • 1,228 Posts
    • 10,262 Thanks
    karcher
    • #5
    • 9th Aug 17, 9:06 PM
    • #5
    • 9th Aug 17, 9:06 PM
    Midge spray, baby wipes, midge spray, baby wipes, things to eat that just need water added or not much heating up, midge spray, a spade/loo roll, windproof lighter, water, lots of booze. Plenty of changes of clothes so if you can layer up if you get cold or change if damp. Might be worth borrowing some kit if you can, see how you get on and take from there
    Originally posted by caronc
    You forgot to mention Midge Spray
    • MallyGirl
    • By MallyGirl 9th Aug 17, 9:12 PM
    • 1,829 Posts
    • 6,189 Thanks
    MallyGirl
    • #6
    • 9th Aug 17, 9:12 PM
    • #6
    • 9th Aug 17, 9:12 PM
    A trowel
    • karcher
    • By karcher 9th Aug 17, 10:44 PM
    • 1,228 Posts
    • 10,262 Thanks
    karcher
    • #7
    • 9th Aug 17, 10:44 PM
    • #7
    • 9th Aug 17, 10:44 PM
    My essentials are:
    Tea/coffee, long life milk, small stove and pan to boil water in.
    Tap water in a big plastic refillable container.
    Torch/ head torch...firelighters and a couple of lighters (twigs and logs for fire to be locally sourced).
    Toilet Roll

    Alcohol, corkscrew, munchies.... rinse and repeat.....

    Oh and a tin of baked beans
    • Doveling
    • By Doveling 10th Aug 17, 9:06 AM
    • 393 Posts
    • 7,068 Thanks
    Doveling
    • #8
    • 10th Aug 17, 9:06 AM
    • #8
    • 10th Aug 17, 9:06 AM
    A bag to take your rubbish home in.
    No one should be able to tell where you've camped

    Oh, did anyone mention midge spray
    Not dim .....just living in soft focus
    • comeandgo
    • By comeandgo 10th Aug 17, 9:36 AM
    • 1,720 Posts
    • 2,296 Thanks
    comeandgo
    • #9
    • 10th Aug 17, 9:36 AM
    • #9
    • 10th Aug 17, 9:36 AM
    Don't skimp on your tent. Buy a decent second hand one rather than a cheap new one. Weather can be very very wet and windy so you need to keep dry. Keep your tent well airaited or you will get condensation. It can be cold at night. I'm a cold sleeper so my sleeping bag for summer goes to minus 10, in winter minus 33. You need sleeping mats to stop the cold seeping up from below.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 10th Aug 17, 10:12 AM
    • 12,531 Posts
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    Gloomendoom
    If your relationship with the other adult is close, I wouldn't bother with sleeping bags at all. Take two double (or king size duvets) and a double air mattress or, for the ultimate in comfort, two singles side by side.

    We used to use separate bags but found shared duvets warmer and less restricting.
    Advice; it rhymes with mice. Advise; it rhymes with wise.
    • culpepper
    • By culpepper 10th Aug 17, 10:15 AM
    • 3,845 Posts
    • 6,957 Thanks
    culpepper
    Use a head torch. It is so much easier to have both hands free.
    Look on instructables dot com for how to make lots of gear .
    Take a wool hat for night time .
    Have a plastic bag for putting wet /dirty gear in .
    You can get various 'just add hot water' type foods from places such as lidl and Aldi (savoury rice variations and noodles) without breaking the bank.
    • money tree
    • By money tree 10th Aug 17, 6:13 PM
    • 37 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    money tree
    Tent, any recommendations here for a good quality tent? The trouble with the cheap ones is that they are not water-proof (see some of the reviews on Amazon!), which is important particularly with reference to some of the deluges we have had recently!
    • t33
    • By t33 10th Aug 17, 8:10 PM
    • 30 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    t33
    Ah, I'd forgotten about the midges (as if!! haha). I had thought of the borders for a first venture or two so as to not turn off - somewhat reluctant - OH.

    Thanks for all the suggestions and hints. Though not sure quite why baby wipes? or a trowel ? (unless for making good the ground after use back to its original state).

    I also get cold easily so I'm thinking of a good roll up foam mattress I have in the garage anyway as un under layer.

    Things have changed and seemingly improved of late and see some very reasonably priced items to take (e.g. Campingaz Bistro stove). As for other cooking stuff, I think I can get together some stuff from what I have in the kitchen - small fry pan, saucepan, cutlery. Also have good portable torches, will look out for head torch though.

    Foodwise I'm thinking breakfast definitely home cooked, but hadn't really thought of lunch/supper ideas though something simple (maybe a breakfast repeat-ish?) for one meal and a meal in a pub (or is that cheating?).

    I'm not really one to borrow stuff, but have been offered various things and may well borrow a tent if I can't find something good and reasonably priced and definitely waterproof.

    Will have to look at a large water container, hadn't thought of that.

    Alcohol obviously essential! and added to growing Trip List.

    Thanks again.
    • caronc
    • By caronc 10th Aug 17, 8:26 PM
    • 2,062 Posts
    • 14,002 Thanks
    caronc
    Though not sure quite why baby wipes? or a trowel ? (unless for making good the ground after use back to its original state).
    Originally posted by t33
    If you're wild camping they'll be no showers, loos or washing facilities so you'll need a spade/trowel to bury what you "do" and wipes to clean face/hands etc. Be aware that the midges are particularly fond of areas that don't see the sun too often and watch out for nettles
    April GC £150/£160, May GC £150/£150, June GC £117/£120, July £185/£170, August £89/£120
    • Purple kitten
    • By Purple kitten 10th Aug 17, 10:01 PM
    • 1,701 Posts
    • 18,674 Thanks
    Purple kitten
    Avon skin so soft, is a brilliant midge repellent.
    • caronc
    • By caronc 10th Aug 17, 10:13 PM
    • 2,062 Posts
    • 14,002 Thanks
    caronc
    Avon skin so soft, is a brilliant midge repellent.
    Originally posted by Purple kitten
    sadly they have apparently changed the formula and it doesn't work as well shame was really good at keeping the little blighters at bay
    April GC £150/£160, May GC £150/£150, June GC £117/£120, July £185/£170, August £89/£120
    • glennevis
    • By glennevis 10th Aug 17, 10:15 PM
    • 101 Posts
    • 72 Thanks
    glennevis
    Avon stuff never works for me. Recommend something with deet in it. I use Ultrathon which is a waterproof cream. Was a quid from Home Bargains, though before I found it there I was paying about £3 a tube.
    • Purple kitten
    • By Purple kitten 10th Aug 17, 10:53 PM
    • 1,701 Posts
    • 18,674 Thanks
    Purple kitten
    Ahh shame, it was a good 5 years ago now. Why do they have to change these things...
    • culpepper
    • By culpepper 11th Aug 17, 12:13 PM
    • 3,845 Posts
    • 6,957 Thanks
    culpepper
    I have heard that sage leaves deter midges if burnt on a fire.
    We used neem oil last year after being gorged on ,you can add it to shampoo and shower gel. It smells a bit odd but it helped a lot.

    We car camp and take a bucket loo for that. Basically a bucket with bags and wood based kitty litter. You can then dispose of waste in a dustbin .
    When tent camping ,we have a pop up loo tent which works for a shower tent too (about £20)and then I have a fold up home made loo made from a seat and a bag and the same kitty litter.Its a Big bag and smaller bags, the big for outer bag and the small for individual uses. An elastic band half way up the big bag so when the small bags are used and tied,they can be enclosed in bottom of big bag without the need to disclose the previous offerings. Even the OH will use them and he is very anti pooo.
    Take a little bottle of hand cleanser for your paws.

    It can get quite expensive if you are feeding yourself at the pub more than once or twice.
    We dehydrate some meals at home to take and take a few things vacuum sealed .
    I made a cooler from some discarded polystyrene fish boxes and that worked quite well on its maiden voyage to hold marg and vac sealed cooked meats/mayo and bread.

    Extra stuff to take..
    Sewing kit (tooth floss and some needles in the tooth floss box).
    A couple of needles threaded with a length of black and white cotton in there too.
    Gaffer tape
    Small pocket knife
    tin opener
    matches and a lighter


    Something to guard against wind when lighting and using your stove.
    (you can make a mini wind guard from a bit of tarp/plastic bag and sticks)

    Emergency grub...

    Powdered soups.
    Ramen type noodles
    Sweets
    Dried milk
    Cocoa
    Rice cakes or crackers
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 11th Aug 17, 8:55 PM
    • 22,775 Posts
    • 87,598 Thanks
    Jojo the Tightfisted
    A Kelly Kettle.

    It means you'll be able to get hot water quickly from a tiny amount of flammable stuff and you can cook over the top with the appropriate attachments. And you're significantly less likely to set fire to half the hillside in the process. They're expensive, but they really work, even in rain, wind and tempest. And three lighters in a waterproof bag.

    I wouldn't use a gas powered stove - you then have a gas can to dispose of or you drive back to civilisation with a vague whiff of flammability in the car...


    Other than that, warm socks, waterproof boots, waterproof trousers, waterproof jacket, waterproof ground sheet, water and sun proof hat, waterproof bag to store your bedding in every morning (if you don't have to dry it first, that is) - some cheapo fleece blankets are good because they're light and dry quickly and can be wrapped around you even in the rain - coffee, teabags, biscuits and mugs (enamel are perfect for a reason) in a waterproof container, an OS map of where you are going in a waterprrof bag, a compass (it's very easy to get lost in the dark), a headtorch each so you can find each other in the dark after a visit to the treeline with spare batteries in a waterproof bag, first aid kit including paracetamol and waterproof dressings, tick removers, antiseptic wipes, antihistamine cream, alcohol hand gel (which can be used in a pinch on cuts, but it stings like the Devil) - and maybe a bit of midge spray.


    You also need to make sure somebody knows exactly where you are going/have got to, when you will be returning, a powerbank for keeping mobile phones charged will be useful in case of emergencies (check if you have signal, because if there's a choice of two places, choosing a place with signal is incredibly handy if one of you trips and breaks an ankle, for example).

    Starting out in a more accessible area makes more sense than disappearing off into the back of beyond with no experience at all - the people who do it make it sound easy, but unless they are utter fools, they have already followed the learning curve. Make sure you can read a map properly - which means understanding all the symbols on it and can navigate from a starting point of not having a clue where you are - and how to give a precise grid reference for your position. You will not be able to rely upon Google Maps or a Sat Nav to tell you or anybody else where you are.


    Other important things are knowing what's happening with wildlife/flora/fauna at the time of year - you don't want to set up camp in the middle of a capercaille lek as they're endangered or disturb nesting raptors, if it's in the middle of the rut, stags are more argumentative, you might stumble upon a shooting party (always a bad idea), some trees are more prone to branches snapping, there could be rare plants on the ground you're stamping on...and along with that, make sure you know how to read the weather and how it could affect your site; heavy rain on the top of a far off hill could mean the little stream you're camped by suddenly becomes very cold, very deep, very fast running and very wet in your camp, or the slight yellow tinge to the edge of those clouds could mean it's likely to snow overnight.

    And your vehicle needs to be able to get out of wherever it is after 24 hours of solid rain. Pointing it halfway down a slope (especially if the tent is lower) is not the way to find out whether the car can cope with six inches of squish.


    Other than that, it's simple. Have fun!

    ETA: you didn't know about the need for a trowel or babywipes and you have no equipment. Are you sure you're ready for wild camping? There's no shame in going to sites for a few times before setting out *thataway*, just to get your bearings again.
    Last edited by Jojo the Tightfisted; 11-08-2017 at 8:59 PM.
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

    Yup you are officially Rock n Roll
    Originally posted by colinw
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