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  • FIRST POST
    • emperorstevee
    • By emperorstevee 6th Aug 17, 2:37 AM
    • 38Posts
    • 20Thanks
    emperorstevee
    Best Investments To Save Money In The Long Run?
    • #1
    • 6th Aug 17, 2:37 AM
    Best Investments To Save Money In The Long Run? 6th Aug 17 at 2:37 AM
    Hello everyone, I hope you are well!

    I don't have too much money and I take satisfaction in investing in things that save money in the long run. I've invested in things such as LED bulbs due to less power consumption, curtains to conserve heat and shower heads with different settings for less water use. What genius ideas do you have for investments that save money in the long run? I'm looking for savings in any area at all - from cooking, to cleaning to gaming. I don't have a massive budget to work with, mind.

    Thanks
Page 2
    • bouicca21
    • By bouicca21 13th Aug 17, 2:50 AM
    • 3,145 Posts
    • 3,881 Thanks
    bouicca21
    I'd never heard of a remoska until I read this thread. Was really taken by the idea until I discovered how much they cost. How long/often would I have to use one to be in 'profit'. I have a double oven - both fitting into the size of a single ordinary one, and except at Christmas I only ever use the smaller of the two. I assume that because it is so small it's cheap to run. How much cheaper would a remoska be?
    • Living proof
    • By Living proof 13th Aug 17, 10:11 AM
    • 1,221 Posts
    • 7,983 Thanks
    Living proof
    I bought mine at a charity shop and I think it was £10. I have seen the larger one boxed at a car boot sale for very little, so it's worth looking out and maybe on Gumtree, etc.
    Solar Suntellite 250 x16 4kW Afore 3600TL dual 2KW E 2KW W no shade, DN15 March 14
    Mortgage and Debt Free. Unfortunately Pension Free too!
    • emperorstevee
    • By emperorstevee 13th Aug 17, 2:49 PM
    • 38 Posts
    • 20 Thanks
    emperorstevee
    Well, before we get this gas in our house, it is converted from various forms starting from crude oil. Each time this energy is transferred from one form to another, part of the energy will be transferred into forms that will not be collected, for example heat energy when the oil is being extracted. By the time it gets to your house, so much energy would have been lost from the system. And then every time you wish to use the central heating, new fossil fuels will have to be constantly burnt. A lot of the heat produced will be lost out of the windows, through walls, the ceiling, floors. You would save hordes of money by instead relying on such a wasteful system by simply wearing more layers, closing doors, investing in thick curtains etc.
    • mumofthetwins
    • By mumofthetwins 13th Aug 17, 4:45 PM
    • 870 Posts
    • 3,802 Thanks
    mumofthetwins
    I'd never heard of a remoska until I read this thread. Was really taken by the idea until I discovered how much they cost. How long/often would I have to use one to be in 'profit'. I have a double oven - both fitting into the size of a single ordinary one, and except at Christmas I only ever use the smaller of the two. I assume that because it is so small it's cheap to run. How much cheaper would a remoska be?
    Originally posted by bouicca21
    My mam picked my ramoska up at the boot sale £3 and I use it all the time !
    Perfect if it's just me or the kids. I cook everything from sausages to mince and dumplings and they all turn out fab .. best £3 spent (although she wouldn't take the money so effectively cost £0 )

    Lisa x
    This time I'm sticking with it !!
    Oct /£300 3NSD
    PAD
    June £3362.78 July £1803.88 Aug £1895 Oct £483.77
    • pineapple
    • By pineapple 13th Aug 17, 5:27 PM
    • 5,939 Posts
    • 27,910 Thanks
    pineapple
    You would save hordes of money by instead relying on such a wasteful system by simply wearing more layers, closing doors, investing in thick curtains etc.
    Originally posted by emperorstevee
    You said this earlier so I'll ask again 'Are you saying you have no heating at all? Because earlier you were talking as if central heating was the only form of heating and of course that's not the case. Plenty of us don't have CH. I have no heating in the bedrooms but I do have a solid fuel stove that spreads warmth throughout the house. Plus when it is on I also use it to heat water and cook meals.
    I wouldn't like to be without any form of warmth at all and all the layering and thickest curtains in the world won't save an older person from hypothermia.
    • Hermia
    • By Hermia 13th Aug 17, 6:38 PM
    • 4,114 Posts
    • 11,054 Thanks
    Hermia
    You said this earlier so I'll ask again 'Are you saying you have no heating at all? Because earlier you were talking as if central heating was the only form of heating and of course that's not the case. Plenty of us don't have CH. I have no heating in the bedrooms but I do have a solid fuel stove that spreads warmth throughout the house. Plus when it is on I also use it to heat water and cook meals.
    I wouldn't like to be without any form of warmth at all and all the layering and thickest curtains in the world won't save an older person from hypothermia.
    Originally posted by pineapple
    I have a well insulated house, but when the heating has been off in winter it still can get very cold indeed. I wouldn't be able to do any work at home in that temperature. I have storage heaters, not CH.
    • Slinky
    • By Slinky 13th Aug 17, 9:35 PM
    • 4,580 Posts
    • 19,559 Thanks
    Slinky
    Bunging on another layer of clothes is all well and good but homes do need heating to keep them in good order. A relative of mine doesn't heat his properly and it's full of damp and mould. The fabric of the house is deteriorating through not being kept sufficiently warm and dry.
    • pineapple
    • By pineapple 14th Aug 17, 10:08 AM
    • 5,939 Posts
    • 27,910 Thanks
    pineapple
    Bunging on another layer of clothes is all well and good but homes do need heating to keep them in good order. A relative of mine doesn't heat his properly and it's full of damp and mould. The fabric of the house is deteriorating through not being kept sufficiently warm and dry.
    Originally posted by Slinky
    Indeed. I'm still waiting to hear how stevee has found CH to be 'unreliable' and also whether he is advocating no heating at all. Just to repeat - plenty of us manage without CH. It can make life more comfortable but it is not essential to life. On the other hand going without any form of heat is likely to have a detrimental effect on life as well as on the fabric of your home (as you say).
    • Out, Vile Jelly
    • By Out, Vile Jelly 14th Aug 17, 11:31 AM
    • 3,590 Posts
    • 11,921 Thanks
    Out, Vile Jelly
    I must have saved a lot of money over the years by being vegetarian (that means eating vegetable-based meals, not buying pricey meat substitute products). Hoping it's an investment in my health too.

    Another biggie is vehicles; they all depreciate (unless it's some kind of unique vintage rarity that collectors will fight over) but a shiny new one will depreciate faster and sharper. I do wonder how much of the UK economy is based on people being encouraged to buy new cars all the time.
    They are an EYESORES!!!!
    • Wednesday2000
    • By Wednesday2000 14th Aug 17, 12:26 PM
    • 1,135 Posts
    • 5,911 Thanks
    Wednesday2000
    I'd never heard of a remoska until I read this thread.
    Originally posted by bouicca21
    Same here!
    "It doesn't cost any more to dream big."
    • pineapple
    • By pineapple 14th Aug 17, 1:06 PM
    • 5,939 Posts
    • 27,910 Thanks
    pineapple
    I've started doing more batch cooking and need larger pans. I think a decent large stockpot or similar would pay for itself over time.
    Plus I'm looking at pressure cookers. Being on E7 means a hiked day time rate so for me a pressure cooker would definitely help. Also looking at thermal cookers but they are such an expensive outlay. I know you can make your own haybox type arrangement but it's a bit of a faff.
    Last edited by pineapple; 14-08-2017 at 1:08 PM.
    • krlyr
    • By krlyr 14th Aug 17, 7:11 PM
    • 5,780 Posts
    • 11,915 Thanks
    krlyr
    I have a no central heating rule. It is unreliable and expensive, as are all fossil fuels Rather than keeping central heating on, which has to constantly burning fuel aka money for every second that it is on, I have invested in curtains and wear more layers, close windows and doors etc
    Originally posted by emperorstevee
    I'm certainly not a softy when it comes to cold weather, I grew up in a farm cottage with original single glazed sash windows (rather on the draughty side, too) and no central heating - we wore jumpers, snuggled under blankets, and all retreated to the living room in front of a log fire in winter. Hot water bottles at the foot of the bed to take the chill off, PJs and socks were a must. I'm still often found in a t-shirt in cold weather with people giving me puzzled looks and asking if I'm not freezing.

    But it's about more than keeping warm, the house I'm in now (like many of the houses on this road) has had issues with condensation and damp. I'm certainly happy to open windows and doors for ventilation, but the issue didn't get under control until we fitted a thermostat and kept the house at a fairly constant temperature (nothing too hot - 16-18 degrees).
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