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  • FIRST POST
    • emperorstevee
    • By emperorstevee 6th Aug 17, 2:37 AM
    • 38Posts
    • 20Thanks
    emperorstevee
    Best Investments To Save Money In The Long Run?
    • #1
    • 6th Aug 17, 2:37 AM
    Best Investments To Save Money In The Long Run? 6th Aug 17 at 2:37 AM
    Hello everyone, I hope you are well!

    I don't have too much money and I take satisfaction in investing in things that save money in the long run. I've invested in things such as LED bulbs due to less power consumption, curtains to conserve heat and shower heads with different settings for less water use. What genius ideas do you have for investments that save money in the long run? I'm looking for savings in any area at all - from cooking, to cleaning to gaming. I don't have a massive budget to work with, mind.

    Thanks
Page 1
    • tacpot12
    • By tacpot12 6th Aug 17, 8:52 AM
    • 668 Posts
    • 574 Thanks
    tacpot12
    • #2
    • 6th Aug 17, 8:52 AM
    • #2
    • 6th Aug 17, 8:52 AM
    I like repairing things and buy tools that allow me to do this. It saves a lot of money compared to hiring trades people to fix stuff.

    I buy used off eBay or new depending how much use I expect to get out of the tool and how expensive the tool is to buy new.
    • JackieO
    • By JackieO 6th Aug 17, 9:04 AM
    • 15,356 Posts
    • 125,105 Thanks
    JackieO
    • #3
    • 6th Aug 17, 9:04 AM
    • #3
    • 6th Aug 17, 9:04 AM
    My slow cooker has saved me a fortune over the years and I invested in a remoska several years ago which was ideal for me as it means I can cook stuff without having to put my big oven on A large empty emulsion plastic drum catches all the cold water in my shower ,before it runs hot, and I use the water on my garden in the summer as I am on a meter my water rates now are £14 per month .Why throw money down the drain

    I use all my bendy veg that I can and make soup,if I don't want to eat straight away they are frozen in pouches My freezer saves me a lot of cash as I freeze any left over bits if I can,even left over bits of pastry get frozen until there is enough to use in a pie Nothing is ever wasted in my house as to me food that I have bought I will use I can see no point in throwing cash away ,even if its in the form of food its still hard cash that you have paid for it.

    I don't eat bread anymore as it was just going off before I could eat it (I dropped a stone and a half as well ) I eat crackers .In the same way I use UHT milk instead of fresh as that too was going off before being used up and UHT is fine for me in a cuppa or with cereal.I make my own cakes and biscuits and shop bought cakes with a three month bbd to me must be full of chemicals and additives I don't think I want to eat a cake thats been sitting in a shop for three months !!
    Quot Libros,Quam Breve Tempus.
    • Prinzessilein
    • By Prinzessilein 6th Aug 17, 9:34 AM
    • 2,006 Posts
    • 9,274 Thanks
    Prinzessilein
    • #4
    • 6th Aug 17, 9:34 AM
    • #4
    • 6th Aug 17, 9:34 AM
    I totally agree about the value of a slowcooker...it easily recoups the initial investment ( a basic model can be bought for around £25 - and often cheaper)...and moreover, the food it cooks is sublime! From slowcooked pig trotters with split peas for a cheap but delicious soup in winter....to lamb slowcooked to melt-in-the-mouth tenderness for a meal worthy of gracing any posh dinner-party table (just add a slosh of red wine and a splodge of redcurrant jelly when cooking - and serve with buttery mash...drooooool!)....and it makes batch cooking super-easy too.

    Personally I have found a wide necked thermos to be a good buy...I eat lots of joghurt! Making your own saves £s over a year. (and then add whatever local grown fruit is on offer!)

    I also believe that a good pair of shoes is an investment worth the money....partly because I have very awkward feet and the bargain-shop shoes half cripple me....but also because a good pair can last me years!

    A good kettle is useful - one that boils just one cup at a time works for me - I live alone.

    But the single biggest investment to save money??????........a notepad and pencil!...costs just pennies and saves me untold pounds!...I can keep a record of what is in the freezer/cupboards....I can keep an ongoing list of what needs to be bought...I can write a shopping list (and avoid the temptations of impulse buying)...I can write out a menu plan so I KNOW what I will be eating rather than wondering half an hour before dinner what I 'fancy' having for my meal. (Funny, but 95% of the time, what I 'fancy' would cost way more than something planned!)....not that I NEVER give in to impulse, but the notepad sure helps!
    • Greenqueen
    • By Greenqueen 8th Aug 17, 7:30 PM
    • 319 Posts
    • 546 Thanks
    Greenqueen
    • #5
    • 8th Aug 17, 7:30 PM
    • #5
    • 8th Aug 17, 7:30 PM
    Sewing needle with black and white thread. Always try mending before buying new!
    • jk0
    • By jk0 8th Aug 17, 8:23 PM
    • 1,986 Posts
    • 23,075 Thanks
    jk0
    • #6
    • 8th Aug 17, 8:23 PM
    • #6
    • 8th Aug 17, 8:23 PM
    Miele washing machine. Yes, I know they are nearly £1000, but mine is nearly 12 years old, and not broken once. It is used almost daily as I have allergies and need to wash my blankets every two weeks.

    They are meant to last 20 years, so maybe £50 a year.

    BTW, I have them in 12 BTL flats and have about one repair per year.
    • krlyr
    • By krlyr 8th Aug 17, 8:33 PM
    • 5,779 Posts
    • 11,915 Thanks
    krlyr
    • #7
    • 8th Aug 17, 8:33 PM
    • #7
    • 8th Aug 17, 8:33 PM
    A thermostat for the heating - not only does it save having to whack the heating on for ages to warm the house up, but it keeps things like damp/mould at bay too
    • Hermia
    • By Hermia 8th Aug 17, 8:41 PM
    • 4,114 Posts
    • 11,054 Thanks
    Hermia
    • #8
    • 8th Aug 17, 8:41 PM
    • #8
    • 8th Aug 17, 8:41 PM
    I also believe that a good pair of shoes is an investment worth the money....partly because I have very awkward feet and the bargain-shop shoes half cripple me....but also because a good pair can last me years!
    Originally posted by Prinzessilein
    I agree. I recently bought some pricey walking trainers and I have been able to walk a lot more before my feet get tired (5-10 miles rather than a few miles) . I have therefore not had to catch the bus home from places like I used to.

    Good kitchen storage - since starting batch cooking I have bought some decent sturdy storage containers that stack in the freezer well and won't open accidentally.

    Kindle - I am a huge bookworm so I use this daily and have saved so much money on books.

    Netflix (or whatever service suits your taste in films) - I am also a big cinephile so have saved a fortune on DVDs since I started using online movie sites.
    • Ballymackeonan
    • By Ballymackeonan 9th Aug 17, 8:26 AM
    • 604 Posts
    • 1,451 Thanks
    Ballymackeonan
    • #9
    • 9th Aug 17, 8:26 AM
    • #9
    • 9th Aug 17, 8:26 AM
    I'd also agree about the Remoska - since I bought mine (10+ years ago) I've only needed to use the full oven on a few occasions! I've also got a Wonderbag which is great for casseroles etc -you start the cooking on the hob and then stick the pot in the Wonderbag to continue, a bit like a slow cooker as it retains the heat.

    I put part of every loaf of bread in the freezer, pre-sliced, and take out as needed - and also freeze blackberries at this time of year for use during the winter. A well-filled freezer is more economical to run.

    If you've got space for one, an old-fashioned clothes horse for drying clothes is useful - I've saved a fortune as I haven't used a tumble dryer for ages!
    • Blackbeard of Perranporth
    • By Blackbeard of Perranporth 9th Aug 17, 8:46 AM
    • 4,572 Posts
    • 27,554 Thanks
    Blackbeard of Perranporth
    I totally agree about the value of a slowcooker...it easily recoups the initial investment ( a basic model can be bought for around £25 - and often cheaper)...and moreover, the food it cooks is sublime! From slowcooked pig trotters with split peas for a cheap but delicious soup in winter....to lamb slowcooked to melt-in-the-mouth tenderness for a meal worthy of gracing any posh dinner-party table (just add a slosh of red wine and a splodge of redcurrant jelly when cooking - and serve with buttery mash...drooooool!)....and it makes batch cooking super-easy too.

    Personally I have found a wide necked thermos to be a good buy...I eat lots of joghurt! Making your own saves £s over a year. (and then add whatever local grown fruit is on offer!)

    I also believe that a good pair of shoes is an investment worth the money....partly because I have very awkward feet and the bargain-shop shoes half cripple me....but also because a good pair can last me years!

    A good kettle is useful - one that boils just one cup at a time works for me - I live alone.

    But the single biggest investment to save money??????........a notepad and pencil!...costs just pennies and saves me untold pounds!...I can keep a record of what is in the freezer/cupboards....I can keep an ongoing list of what needs to be bought...I can write a shopping list (and avoid the temptations of impulse buying)...I can write out a menu plan so I KNOW what I will be eating rather than wondering half an hour before dinner what I 'fancy' having for my meal. (Funny, but 95% of the time, what I 'fancy' would cost way more than something planned!)....not that I NEVER give in to impulse, but the notepad sure helps!
    Originally posted by Prinzessilein
    A thermostat for the heating - not only does it save having to whack the heating on for ages to warm the house up, but it keeps things like damp/mould at bay too
    Originally posted by krlyr
    second the thermostat. Get a programmable one. Ours is on 24/7 everyday of the year. No cold no mould. Bills are £75 a month fixed til December 17. Set at 19C when occupied. 14C when not. Boiler never on for more than five minutes unless it is very cold. Get rid of thermostat radiator valves.
    Watching the trail
    of cheap supermarket bags filled with a lfe gone by
    • grunnie
    • By grunnie 9th Aug 17, 9:00 AM
    • 1,584 Posts
    • 8,916 Thanks
    grunnie
    A freezer and keep a list of what is in it.
    Good shoes and a good bed ( my granny used to say if you weren't in one you were in the other)
    A clothes airer and if you use a tumble drier put a dry tea towel in and the wet washing will dry quicker.
    Good pans they last for ever - most of mine came from sales and charity shops.
    will add to the list later when I have more time


    I got a slow cooker and used it twice so it is on freegle in the hope someone near me wants it.
    • Hermia
    • By Hermia 9th Aug 17, 11:10 AM
    • 4,114 Posts
    • 11,054 Thanks
    Hermia
    If you've got space for one, an old-fashioned clothes horse for drying clothes is useful - I've saved a fortune as I haven't used a tumble dryer for ages!
    Originally posted by Ballymackeonan
    I have one of those heated ones from Lakeland and it is honestly one of my best purchases. I live in a flat so even having damp bath towels hanging around is not good re: mould etc. I use my airer every day.
    • Wednesday2000
    • By Wednesday2000 9th Aug 17, 11:25 AM
    • 1,132 Posts
    • 5,891 Thanks
    Wednesday2000
    A
    A clothes airer and if you use a tumble drier put a dry tea towel in and the wet washing will dry quicker.
    Originally posted by grunnie
    I've never heard of that.
    "It doesn't cost any more to dream big."
    • grunnie
    • By grunnie 9th Aug 17, 11:27 AM
    • 1,584 Posts
    • 8,916 Thanks
    grunnie
    I've never heard of that.
    Originally posted by Wednesday2000
    Shortens the time from about 60 minutes to about 40 for a pair kingsize cotton sheets.
    The dry tea towel absorbs the water from the washing and then it dries too. magic
    • Wednesday2000
    • By Wednesday2000 10th Aug 17, 12:05 PM
    • 1,132 Posts
    • 5,891 Thanks
    Wednesday2000
    I'm going to try the tea towel thing right after my load of washing finishes.
    "It doesn't cost any more to dream big."
    • emperorstevee
    • By emperorstevee 11th Aug 17, 11:50 PM
    • 38 Posts
    • 20 Thanks
    emperorstevee
    I have a no central heating rule. It is unreliable and expensive, as are all fossil fuels Rather than keeping central heating on, which has to constantly burning fuel aka money for every second that it is on, I have invested in curtains and wear more layers, close windows and doors etc
    • grunnie
    • By grunnie 12th Aug 17, 8:52 AM
    • 1,584 Posts
    • 8,916 Thanks
    grunnie
    I also believe in good door mats at every entrance. Most dust comes in on your feet so a door mat cuts down on the amount of dust over your floors. I also take my outside shoes off when I come home and have a pair of shoes just for in the house. Cuts the need to hoover everyday if you have kids ( I had 3 sons ) when their pals came round I could work out who was upstairs by recognising their trainers.
    • pineapple
    • By pineapple 12th Aug 17, 3:24 PM
    • 5,939 Posts
    • 27,910 Thanks
    pineapple
    I have a no central heating rule. It is unreliable and expensive, as are all fossil fuels Rather than keeping central heating on, which has to constantly burning fuel aka money for every second that it is on, I have invested in curtains and wear more layers, close windows and doors etc
    Originally posted by emperorstevee
    How is central heating 'unreliable'? Are you saying you have no heating at all then?
    • pineapple
    • By pineapple 12th Aug 17, 3:41 PM
    • 5,939 Posts
    • 27,910 Thanks
    pineapple
    I totally agree about the value of a slowcooker...it easily recoups the initial investment
    Originally posted by Prinzessilein
    But does it? There have been mixed opinions on here. http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=518702&highlight=slow+cooker+elec tricity+cost I've tried to get an answer off the net but a lot of comparisons are based on cooking in the oven as an alternative. But what about something simmering on a hob? And what if you use the oven to capacity when it's on?
    I've heard of people cooking things like bolognese in a slow cooker. Imo that's ridiculous. I do have a slow cooker but only use it for cheap cuts of meat. Plus I'm on E7 so for me, putting it on overnight is good value.
    Not convinced generally though.
    Last edited by pineapple; 12-08-2017 at 3:50 PM.
    • Living proof
    • By Living proof 12th Aug 17, 8:10 PM
    • 1,221 Posts
    • 7,982 Thanks
    Living proof
    I have three slow cookers of varying sizes, paid £5/£3/£1 for them at car boot sales. I think they pay their way!
    Solar Suntellite 250 x16 4kW Afore 3600TL dual 2KW E 2KW W no shade, DN15 March 14
    Mortgage and Debt Free. Unfortunately Pension Free too!
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