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  • FIRST POST
    • pollyanna 26
    • By pollyanna 26 11th Sep 16, 9:56 PM
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    pollyanna 26
    OS ways and Poor Health
    • #1
    • 11th Sep 16, 9:56 PM
    OS ways and Poor Health 11th Sep 16 at 9:56 PM
    Earlier today I joined a very good new thread on getting back to old style ways . I managed to take it in another direction by mentioning how ill health can impact on doing everything the old style way . As this was off topic to the original post . I will be posting on the original topic but without going off in another direction
    This seems to happen a lot of the time across the threads as many old stylers do have to cope with this problem .
    Many moons ago PREPARE AT HOME began a lengthy thread on being os with health problems and there have been a couple of other threads over the years .
    I am wondering if the time is right for another thread on the subject with the proviso it is not offering advice on medical subjects as that is for the professionals . We all do many things day to day to minimise fatigue and pain and though they are little things we have developed them to cope and others may not be aware of how helpful the little changes can be .
    I would be interested to see if others would like to join such a thread . I am not very techie as you will gather from my rambling post and have never started a thread before - I hope this posts !
    polly
Page 2
    • suki1964
    • By suki1964 12th Sep 16, 10:03 PM
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    suki1964
    I wish I had a diagnosis. Not that it would make any difference to our lives, just so I don't feel I'm a fraud

    Today I'm in agony. Fleet feel like every bone in them is broken and I'm literally hobbling

    But it will ease again in a few days

    Along with all joint pain which today is around a 7.

    The pain makes me tired more then anything

    Anyways, I love my feather duster. Well it's not feathers it's a fluffy thing on an extending handle. Light as a feather and I can easily do skirtings, walls ceilings etc.

    Hoovering I know I'm going to have to buy an upright soon enough, the cylinder is just getting too heavy. Shame cos it's brilliant

    Bedding I'm managing to fold with the use of pegs and the kitchen chairs. I prefer to use the clothes horse as the stretch to the line and the weight of wet clothes is getting harder to handle. Least if I hang up indoors I have the kitchen table to drop things on rather then the lawn

    Ring pulls on all tins

    I still scratch cook, but my knives have to be really sharp. Half way through chopping an onion my hands will cramp and lock. I prefer to use a meat slicer for joints


    I'm only 52, had to stop work before Christmas and I notice every week or month I struggle just that wee bit more. I limit my meds, painkillers, anti depressents, etc as I hate feeling totally whacked. However on or off them I feel I only function at half speed, always drowsy, yet I sleep badly because of pain

    Anyways today wasn't too bad, got the bedding washed and folded and hung to dry, vacuumed , and cooked dinner

    Thank god for the dishwasher
    if you lend someone £20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it

    still singing, loud and clear
    • pollyanna 26
    • By pollyanna 26 12th Sep 16, 10:04 PM
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    pollyanna 26
    Hi I am rubbish at posting links , The e cloths are available from lakeland , and other places . I often find the original cloths in tk maxx at good prices . You can buy other cheaper cloths but over the years I found the original ones were better and lasted much longer .
    The mop and the various heads were originally from Lakeland but when I decided to buy LL were stocking another brand . I found mine on amazon . If you put e cloth into google it should bring up the manufacturers page which should show their current range .
    Just spent a long time writing a long post and lost it !
    polly
    • pollyanna 26
    • By pollyanna 26 12th Sep 16, 10:38 PM
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    pollyanna 26
    Following the loss into the ether of my long post I will attempt a short one . Welcome to the new faces lovely to meet you all .
    There are so many good ideas and such a lovely atmosphere on here already . Someone used the word solidarity earlier and I think that is a good feeling to have . I know I live a lot inside my head and do a fair bit of listening to the negative and judgemental side of my brain . The comments on that from Lame Wolf and Larumbelle on being your own worst critic have resonated with me and I hope will make me challenge that way of thinking so thank you both .
    I posted at length on various topics all of which escape me at the moment Can openers was one I recall , as a lefty I could never use the traditional type opting for the manual top of the can sort and as my joints and muscles became bad I opted for the battery type , they worked well but were short lived as the battery was virtually impossible to replace and a google search brought up pages of complaints on the subject . I was in the local sainsbury about 3 years ago and spotted a kenwood electric can opener at a hugely reduced price and it is still going strong . Perfect as long as the stars are in alignment and the brain is working with the hands to secure the can onto the grabby thing - technical term I buy ring pull where possible but my go to when I can barely lift a finger is Ambrosia full cream rice ( I tell myself is must have a lot of calcium in the same way chocolate is a wonderful source of iron ) it comes in the old style can so I need a means of opening cans .
    Tired now so will talk myself into heading for bed and will see you all tomorrow . Wishing you all restful sleep .
    polly
    • pollyanna 26
    • By pollyanna 26 12th Sep 16, 11:57 PM
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    pollyanna 26
    Too much debt .
    I had a quick google about the e mop Lakeland have it again at £19.99 and you can also buy the various pads for wet dry use .
    JL are matching lowest prices and selling for os £ 12.93 as are Amazon where I bought mine . Amazon also have the different pads on the mop page .
    Hope this helps and you do get on of the basic floor pads with the mop wherever you buy from . I find the fluffy dusting head a great addition as you can sweep and dust with it . All the pads are washable and I eventually found two of each in rotation work well but tried the supplied pad and a fluffy one first to make sure it was suitable for my needs .
    Good night
    polly
    • getting my life straight
    • By getting my life straight 13th Sep 16, 9:14 AM
    • 86 Posts
    • 95 Thanks
    getting my life straight
    Love this thread, I have lupus and am hypermobile, with suspected fibro. I struggle with everyday tasks. I had a session with occupational therapy at the hospital and they came up with some great ideas. One of the best was when cooking veggies or anything in water in a pan, was to use a metal basket (bit like the old chip pan baskets) put veg etc in there. When you come to drain, just lift the basket out. Saves struggling and the risk of hot water splashing. Also showed me new ways of peeling, also the idea of filling kettle with water from a jug. Found it very helpful and if anyone is offered it I would recommend it.
    • pollyanna 26
    • By pollyanna 26 13th Sep 16, 10:22 AM
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    pollyanna 26
    Hi GMLS welcome
    That's a really good point about OT . Also if there is a good local pain clinic locally it is well worth anyone asking to be referred there . My daughter who like myself has psoriatic atrhritis and fibro was helped a great deal by ours . There is a wonderful doctor who is a specialist in medication for severe and debilitating pain , a physio team and also o.t and a mental health team . It is a holistic way of dealing with all the various effects of a diagnosis and after assessment you can use all of the options available or choose the ones best for you depending on your health and level of energy . She was also given a course of therapy at the heated pool in the local spinal unit . Being given the chance to discuss her fear , anger and frustration as she was very young led to some excellent coping skills and an open invitation to go back for whichever things she felt would help again .
    I am stubborn and part of my thinking at present is to put a sensible head on and overcome the idea that I need to do everything while in reality a lot of things are not being done .
    My advice is to listen to the real experts who are here on the thread and ignore " the warriors " in real life who if you listen can make you feel as though you're not making an effort .
    polly
    • getting my life straight
    • By getting my life straight 13th Sep 16, 10:44 AM
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    • 95 Thanks
    getting my life straight
    Thanks Polly, I too sometimes try and work through regardless, but boy do I suffer in the days that follow. Pacing yourself is the only way to deal with these illness's and if people don't understand - then stuff them. I have been stubborn in the past, but have got to know limitations and if there is something that can't be avoided like family event, trauma, stress etc, then I adjust meds accordingly. I am on steroids and do increase when not well or if need a helping hand. I would say make use of physio, occ therapy sessions offered as they do help. I appeared one day at a session and was in tears through pain and she popped on a relaxation tape and had me relaxing for the whole session. Probably did more good than my exercises at that particulat time. Hope u have a good pain free day.
    • ArthriticOldThing
    • By ArthriticOldThing 13th Sep 16, 10:53 AM
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    ArthriticOldThing
    What a great thread. Thank you so much for starting it polly.
    I have Psoriatic Arthritis which had never heard of before was diagnosed. Am also diabetic with a few other medical 'incidentals' and struggle so much with tiredness - which is NOT a strong enough word - that have felt like giving up. It's so good to read other people's experiences.
    Reading the comments about kettles has anyone else got a 'kettle tipper'? It's a wonderful gadget like a swing that the kettle is strapped into and boils as usual but swings up to make easy pouring without having to actually lift it.
    The business about pacing oneself is so true. I do a bit then rest a bit and if something doesn't get done then it doesn't!
    Suki, I had to buy an upright a few years ago and am now considering a cordless - all the sockets a at floor level and bending down to plug/unplug often sees me on the floor.
    With can-openers I use the battery type but have two so when the battery goes in one I can use the other til my son visits when he can change the battery.
    Use it up, Wear it out, Make it do, Do without.
    • lessonlearned
    • By lessonlearned 13th Sep 16, 10:58 AM
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    lessonlearned
    Great thread lots of tips - I think I will go through and jot some down.

    I have decided to keep a little notebook of what works, what complimentary medicines or supplements help me most, what gadgets etc might be worth trying.

    Well I don't know about being a "life warrior" but I often feel like I've been in the wars and often for no obvious reason. Sometimes my muscles hurt so much and I just feel shattered and as weak as a kitten. I do try to "soldier on" though because I find its best to keep some movement or I just seize up.

    Anyway lots of tips on here about lifting etc. - especially when cooking. Like the "chip basket" idea for vegetables, will definitely give that a go.

    I have recently bought an extending fluffy duster, it's brilliant. I'm thinking also of a lightweight steam cleaner. Any recommendations please.

    I think the trick is to use any gadgets or gizmos that help and to take short cuts.

    For me the biggest help was to have a serious declutter and trying to adopt the principles of minimalism. I have still got a long way to go, especially in the kitchen. I need to buy some "magic corners" for the base units and some pull out baskets. Hoping to organise that in the next couple of weeks.

    Thanks for the thread, some brilliant ideas.
    • pollyanna 26
    • By pollyanna 26 13th Sep 16, 11:32 AM
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    pollyanna 26
    Thanks GMLS wise words .
    One thing some may do is to educate yourself about your health . I just carried on for many years . PSA is a sero-negative disease and all the blood tests my doctor did never showed the marker for inflammatory arthritis in the end I was wrongly diagnosed with osteo so got by on brufon which eventually began to damage my stomach . Some years later I was diagnosed with Fibro so I put everything down to that although my joints were becoming increasingly damaged . Youngest was then diagnosed with fibro but was really ill . She has badly damaged tendons now in one of her feet due to a wrongly placed steroid injection by the most rude and arrogant consultant it has ever been our misfortune to meet .
    I began to really research all aspects of conditions and patients rights . We spoke to our wonderful young GP and he referred her to another hospital in a different trust . At her first visit the Rheumo consultant diagnosed the psa and prescribed Methotrexate . I would say it's the best thing we ever did . This led to joining a research programme through the hospital and the realisation that there was a genetic link back to my mum .
    I have read a lot and to those interested I would start on the Arthritis uk website . They have loads of information on there and you can order booklets on the different conditions . A helpful one is "Living with long- term pain a guide to self management " which has a lot of information , pages to make notes and a pain and fatigue chart to track your week . I think I ordered about 8 different booklets and they were delivered quite quickly by the postman . Back then they were free with an option to make a donation but I am not sure if that's so now .
    On the subject of research for those who don't already know a doctor at Manchester uni is conducting research at the moment jointly with the charity . " Cloudy with a chance of pain "-as many of us know cold , damp , hot and humid weather triggers our pain and flares . It is trying to track this and has asked as many people as possible to take part to provide a widespread view of the link .
    You need a smart phone , I'm a basic emergency only mobile girl myself but daughter is able to enter both our daily information on her phone . You download the app ( I'm writing this as if I know what an app is ) and give your weather and pain levels . Totally anonymous but another bit in the research that can change the future .
    Now I have exhausted you all I shall go and have a brew and a little sit in the semi -feral garden and consider whether the neighbours will really fall for the idea I'm embracing the prairie style of gardening
    See you later
    polly
    • kittie
    • By kittie 13th Sep 16, 11:44 AM
    • 11,369 Posts
    • 64,795 Thanks
    kittie
    I am not ill as such, just short in height and very nearly 70, also widowed 18 months ago. I have a lot to do here in my house and am keeping my small lovely allotment. I have been working on future proofing and this started about 2 years ago.

    All plants that were high maintenance have gone, there is no grass but several tiers of different colours of gravel and pots and raised beds, which are large as they don`t need to be watered so much. Plants are very easy and colourful, like acers in pots. I have had one lovely japanese acer in a pot, been in there for 18 years

    My shoulders get sore and sometimes it extends right down my arms into my hands, that is when I know I have overdone it. I try and listen to my body and it tells me when to stop. I recently bought a wax bath for my hands, which will soothe and help. I also have several types of hand spints, which I will wear at night as needed, to keep my joints stable

    Being small, I have always known how to move heavier things, like bags of compost. I roll into my 2 wheeled wheelbarrow from the boot and move that way. I also `walk` larger heavier things, I can move a lot of things that way

    We bought single beds just before dh passed, they are good beds but even as a single, the matress is far too awkward and heavy and it needs flipping or turning every quarter, it is hypnos. If I had known, then I would have bought a no-turn matress

    Vaccuuming is not comfortable on my back after a while, so I use a roomba, which is utterly amazing and keeps the dust down

    All my deliveries are via the internet now, I never carry anything heavy
    • pollyanna 26
    • By pollyanna 26 13th Sep 16, 11:51 AM
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    pollyanna 26
    Off to the garden just wanted to say Hi and welcome to AOT and LL lovely to see you both .
    I am in the vacuum dilemma at the moment I can't lift Henry without comeback . He is kept upstairs as only bedrooms and stairs are carpeted but oh those stairs ! I have considered the painted treads and papered risers my eldest daughter did but wonder if they would be slippy .
    I for one would welcome any who have lightweight and or cordless vacs to give their feedback .
    I forgot to mention earlier the weather study input is on a daily basis but it is stressed you can miss when days are bad .
    polly
    • Larumbelle
    • By Larumbelle 13th Sep 16, 11:52 AM
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    Larumbelle

    For me the biggest help was to have a serious declutter and trying to adopt the principles of minimalism. I have still got a long way to go, especially in the kitchen. I need to buy some "magic corners" for the base units and some pull out baskets. Hoping to organise that in the next couple of weeks.
    Originally posted by lessonlearned
    I agree wholeheartedly! I had to get rid of a lot of my belongings when I was made homeless. Thankfully I managed to get my furniture/white goods stored by the council, and friends took things like clothes and books, but anything that wasn't truly essential or truly loved had to go. But now I am settled again, I don't miss anything, other than the stress of never having enough room for things, never being able to keep on top of the clutter, and never being able to find what I'm looking for! An awful lot of what I thought I 'needed' I haven't felt the need to replace. I wouldn't say that I am a minimalist, but I think my new philosophy is that if I have more stuff than I can store in an organised, accessible way, then it is too much for me and will be time to have another cull.


    • Spider In The Bath
    • By Spider In The Bath 13th Sep 16, 11:53 AM
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    Spider In The Bath
    ...Being small, I have always known how to move heavier things, like bags of compost. I roll into my 2 wheeled wheelbarrow from the boot and move that way. I also `walk` larger heavier things, I can move a lot of things that way...
    Originally posted by kittie
    Hello,

    I have one of these for my large garden (although I have the bigger size).

    http://greenfingers.com/product.asp?dept_id=200348&pf_id=DD11154D

    I have mobility issues (rubbish left leg) and prolapsed discs in my back and fused bones in my back also and so the trolley is great. I load all my tools into it, put in a trug for the weeds and sometimes my cat sits in there too as I pull the trolley around the garden working.

    The sides unpin and drop down also. I have had mine quite a few years and although it is now battered looking it is still going strong.
    • Spider In The Bath
    • By Spider In The Bath 13th Sep 16, 11:57 AM
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    Spider In The Bath
    ... but I think my new philosophy is that if I have more stuff than I can store in an organised, accessible way, then it is too much for me and will be time to have another cull.
    Originally posted by Larumbelle
    Totally agree.

    I find that too much stuff actually weights me down. We are quite good at not having too many things, but it still starts to mount up quickly.

    After doing another major de-clutter over the last few months and a re-organisation of things we have cut down the time it takes to clean the whole house by 1 hour!
    • Spider In The Bath
    • By Spider In The Bath 13th Sep 16, 12:14 PM
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    Spider In The Bath
    Things we have done to help me include:

    - Low wheelchair threshold for the french doors into the garden so no big step to get over.

    - Hand rails near the front and side doors to help when it is icy getting in and out of the house.

    - A new worktop oven. We have a large double oven low down and being tall it can be hard to bend down and take things out. So we bought a new drop-down door oven which sits on the worktop and it is great (just made a loaf in it this morning).

    - A plastic basket which hangs on the pipework of the shower to hold shampoo etc. No need to bend down on the floor to reach thing any more.

    - A walk-in pantry. We have lots of windows, doors and a fireplace in our kitchen so nowhere to fit many cupboards. So the best thing to do was to put in a large corner panty. We recently re-did the shelving and I can now get all of the food and almost all of the cooking pots and pans in there. Instead of having to bend to reach anything I can open the door wide and 'lunge' forward on my good leg to reach things as everything is easy to find and see.

    - We use a lot of remote control switches for lamps so no bending to switch them on just leave the remote in easy reach and use this instead.
    • Spider In The Bath
    • By Spider In The Bath 13th Sep 16, 12:34 PM
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    Spider In The Bath
    ...we avoid crowded places because he gets around so slowly, and the stick gets in the way, we wouldn't dream of traveling by train anymore. ..
    Originally posted by Shropshirelass
    I often use a stick and have even tripped over the damn thing! Also, I have some folding sticks so they can be stored out of the way when at the cinema etc:

    https://www.switchsticks.co.uk/store.asp/c=6

    Also, do you know that you can book easy accessible seats near the doors on trains and there is other help available too:

    http://www.nationalrail.co.uk/stations_destinations/disabled_passengers.aspx

    Last time we went to London (and even though my husband was with me) when getting off the train, on both the journey there and back home, a fellow passenger carried my small case off the train for me as soon as they saw I needed help. I didn't tackle the tube though - we used taxis instead.

    Also, John Lewis were great when helping me to buy a lightweight, small, wheeled case. I wanted to make sure that I could cope with the bag handle in one hand and the walking stick in the other. The sales lady spent ages taking all the cases off display for me so that I could try them out.
    • pollyanna 26
    • By pollyanna 26 13th Sep 16, 12:55 PM
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    pollyanna 26
    Kittie Lovely to see you .
    I don't think Kittie will mind me mentioning her wonderful thread on the over 50s forum a lot of really useful information over there about adjusting to changing circumstances .
    Welcome Spider very useful advice . Thank you .
    Larumbelle I keeping meaning to mention your bullet list . I will print it off and put it somewhere visible , thank you .
    Clutter is a problem . What once seemed loved possessions can become a hindrance when we become less able to do everything . I joined the kondo thread last year posted a few times and never went back. So many have changed their lives by following the plan but I am doing it my way for the moment and a doing the most urgent areas first . Books in particular are hard I have a small lifetime of them . I have tried ebooks but they don't bring me the joy of real books . I began to donate large amounts to charity a few years ago but am still trying the letting go of many . Logic tells me the information in the non fiction ones is available all over the net but sentiment argues back .
    I know it is impossible but I often wish mse had drop in centres for books , craft stuff etc where people could choose what they like for free and those who donate could take comfort in passing things on to a good home .
    polly
    • maddiemay
    • By maddiemay 13th Sep 16, 1:08 PM
    • 3,206 Posts
    • 28,184 Thanks
    maddiemay
    Shortish post as I am on hols and hate typing on tablet! Thank you so much Polly for starting this thread. Will introduce myself properly when I get home, but do want to shout the praises of my G tech k9 cordless vac and hand vac, it is a lifesaver. Have hairy dog so does need emptying every use but it is so easy to do. Works on carpet and hard floors automatically and so easy to use, even on a weak bad pain day.
    • Larumbelle
    • By Larumbelle 13th Sep 16, 1:54 PM
    • 2,108 Posts
    • 10,578 Thanks
    Larumbelle
    Kittie Lovely to see you .
    I know it is impossible but I often wish mse had drop in centres for books , craft stuff etc where people could choose what they like for free and those who donate could take comfort in passing things on to a good home .
    polly
    Originally posted by pollyanna 26
    I donated most of what I got rid of to charity shops, so I took comfort that it would raise some money for a good cause and probably make someone else smile because they got a bargain. Not quite the same, but still, some good came of it. Now I am a little more aware of furniture projects, Salvation Army etc I would donate through them where possible, but it is frustrating because I know us thrifty types can do well with stuff that these people have to reject. I'm thinking things like a load of CFL lightbulbs that nobody was allowed to accept because of insurance, leftover paint that nobody round here distributes since the local Community RePaint closed. A lot goes to waste that wouldn't have to.

    Something else that has always got me, is that so many households all buy a ladder each, a drill, a lawnmower, carpet cleaner.. stuff that most people need from time to time, but not all the time. There should be a library for stuff like that!!! I know there are a few of these about now but when an organisation I am connected to looked into the feasibility, insurance, premises etc made it too expensive to do without some funding, and they couldn't find anyone who would support a scheme like that.

    On the plus side, something I have heard we do have round here is a time bank. Those who might want a hand with household tasks, this might be something to look into and see if there is one in your area?

    PS Pollyanna I'm glad the list was useful


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