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    • oneofnine
    • By oneofnine 15th Nov 17, 2:48 AM
    • 26Posts
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    oneofnine
    Our Prospective Home is Empty Next Door
    • #1
    • 15th Nov 17, 2:48 AM
    Our Prospective Home is Empty Next Door 15th Nov 17 at 2:48 AM
    Hi All , going to dive straight in and be blunt - we are buying a house and the person will not negotiate at all .She is refusing to drop even a bit in price .This is frustrating as my house would not have sold without some negotiation and wriggle room .Anyway , stubbornly she wants full ask on a small house in Yorkshire but we have now noticed the run down house next door to her is unoccupied and looks like it has been for some time .Do you think this may be reason to try to negotiate a better price ? Blunt I know but when times are hard and people won't reduce at all ,I wondered .

    Any thoughts welcome.
    thanks .
Page 1
    • badmemory
    • By badmemory 15th Nov 17, 4:11 AM
    • 940 Posts
    • 975 Thanks
    badmemory
    • #2
    • 15th Nov 17, 4:11 AM
    • #2
    • 15th Nov 17, 4:11 AM
    Why not just buy the house next door? If she needs a price, then she needs that price, she doesn't need to sell, so why discount? If she doesn't need to 'negotiate' why should she?
    • comeandgo
    • By comeandgo 15th Nov 17, 5:06 AM
    • 1,863 Posts
    • 2,502 Thanks
    comeandgo
    • #3
    • 15th Nov 17, 5:06 AM
    • #3
    • 15th Nov 17, 5:06 AM
    Why should she drop the price so you get a bargain? If you can’t afford it look at other houses. When we sold there was no way I’d reduce the price, buyers knew when they visited how much it was going for.
    • csgohan4
    • By csgohan4 15th Nov 17, 6:31 AM
    • 3,957 Posts
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    csgohan4
    • #4
    • 15th Nov 17, 6:31 AM
    • #4
    • 15th Nov 17, 6:31 AM
    vendors call tbh, pay what you think it is worth, don't be bullied to paying over the top
    "It is prudent when shopping for something important, not to limit yourself to Pound land"
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 15th Nov 17, 7:47 AM
    • 23,528 Posts
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    Davesnave
    • #5
    • 15th Nov 17, 7:47 AM
    • #5
    • 15th Nov 17, 7:47 AM
    You are looking at the small picture rather than the big one.

    What's the back story to the house next door and how much of a headache might it be living next door to it?

    I know of a house semi detached to another that's been empty for over 10 years. It's a bit of a nightmare for the owner. Theoretically, the council can act, but so far they haven't.

    "Blunt I know but when times are hard and people won't reduce at all ,I wondered ."

    Equally blunt, it looks like you went into this purchase with your eyes wide shut if you've only just found this reason to reduce. I'd say it might be a reason to pull out instead. There are plenty more houses in Yorkshire.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • trailingspouse
    • By trailingspouse 15th Nov 17, 7:57 AM
    • 2,361 Posts
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    trailingspouse
    • #6
    • 15th Nov 17, 7:57 AM
    • #6
    • 15th Nov 17, 7:57 AM
    How long's it been on the market? If not long, then she's right not to reduce just yet. She's not being 'stubborn', she's looking after her own interests. And even if she has an inflated idea of how much it's worth, if she won't shift then she won't shift. If the house really is too expensive for you (which begs the question, why were you looking at it in the first place?), then you need to look elsewhere.

    You say that the house next door is unoccupied - this may be true, but is it on the market? You can't buy it if it's not for sale.
    • ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • By ScorpiondeRooftrouser 15th Nov 17, 7:59 AM
    • 2,029 Posts
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    ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • #7
    • 15th Nov 17, 7:59 AM
    • #7
    • 15th Nov 17, 7:59 AM
    What's your obsession with getting a reduction rather than paying a low price? Some people market at a low price and stick to it. If it is already a low price, why would it be reduced further?

    I know there are plenty of people who would rather pay £80K for something advertised at £100K than pay £70K for exactly the same thing advertised at £70K, but one really should try one's best not to be one of those people.
    Last edited by ScorpiondeRooftrouser; 15-11-2017 at 8:02 AM.
    • shortcrust
    • By shortcrust 15th Nov 17, 8:25 AM
    • 1,418 Posts
    • 1,865 Thanks
    shortcrust
    • #8
    • 15th Nov 17, 8:25 AM
    • #8
    • 15th Nov 17, 8:25 AM
    Stubbornly?! Wow.

    When you say you’re buying the place what do you mean? She either won’t accept your offer in which case you’re not buying, or she has accepted and now you don’t want to stick to that offer. If the latter, why did you offer more than you wanted to pay?
    • oneofnine
    • By oneofnine 15th Nov 17, 8:54 AM
    • 26 Posts
    • 10 Thanks
    oneofnine
    • #9
    • 15th Nov 17, 8:54 AM
    • #9
    • 15th Nov 17, 8:54 AM
    Well when we sold our last house we found houses in our road moving weren't very fast , we had 3 estate agents over 3 years .They all told us the same thing , price it reasonably but be prepared to negotiate too .We had bought the house at £105 , 000 when the market was strong and sold it for £87,500 .We advertised it at £92,000 .My brother in ( a different area )
    has just sold his .His estate agent priced it at £125,000 ,and to sell it he had to negotiate - he got £118,000 .
    I have bought 2 houses in the past and paid full asking price as they were worth it .This house needs some work though .
    No ,we haven't gotten into any commitments with it yet and no the house next door is not for sale .It is owned by a person locally who has just left it empty .We didn't find that out till this morning though ,so we won't be going for the house now .An ill kept, possibly damp house doesn't seem like a good neighbouring property but thanks for all your opinions , especially at short notice
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 15th Nov 17, 9:27 AM
    • 23,528 Posts
    • 89,339 Thanks
    Davesnave
    we won't be going for the house now .An ill kept, possibly damp house doesn't seem like a good neighbouring property
    Originally posted by oneofnine
    If you couldn't get it at the right price for you and it had this 'unknown' hanging over it, the chances are you'd never have been happy with it anyway.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • By ScorpiondeRooftrouser 15th Nov 17, 9:29 AM
    • 2,029 Posts
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    ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    The fact that it needs some work doesn't mean it isn't worth the asking price. People often seem to assume that the asking price is for a house in perfect condition, whereas often they are priced accordingly, especially if the work needed is obvious.

    Similarly, the fact that a house doesn't need work doesn't prevent it from being overpriced in the first place.
    • phoebe1989seb
    • By phoebe1989seb 15th Nov 17, 10:41 AM
    • 3,121 Posts
    • 6,393 Thanks
    phoebe1989seb
    In 2011 we bought an attached period house adjoining one other much smaller property that had been empty for several years. We negotiated a little off the asking price, but this was already low to reflect the condition of the one we were buying and our offer had nothing to do with the house next door. I don't recall being bothered at the time.

    In our case both houses were thatched. The one we purchased had been newly thatched which highlighted the terrible condition of the roof of the adjoining property.

    It turned out the empty house had been owned by a guy with a large property portfolio locally who had been made bankrupt. We looked into buying the adjoining house ourselves but in the 3+ years we were there it never became available for sale. During this time its condition worsened to the extent that the thatch was on the verge of collapse with a huge hole that caused the property to flood in heavy downpours. As the houses were built with thick stone walls ours was never affected, but it worried us nonetheless.

    When we sold in 2014 we had no issue finding a buyer - we sold at asking price - and our buyers like us expressed an interest in buying next door too.

    Only this year did the empty house finally come up for sale - at auction, by which time the pics showed extensive plant life growing through the roof - not sure if our buyers were the successful bidders.
    Last edited by phoebe1989seb; 15-11-2017 at 10:45 AM.
    Paid off mortgage early - mortgage-free since age 40 (2007)

    Over £40,000 mis-sold PPI reclaimed
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