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  • FIRST POST
    • Jamessurfing
    • By Jamessurfing 17th Jul 17, 7:58 PM
    • 23Posts
    • 3Thanks
    Jamessurfing
    Friends And Family Rent Out Flat?
    • #1
    • 17th Jul 17, 7:58 PM
    Friends And Family Rent Out Flat? 17th Jul 17 at 7:58 PM
    Hi all,
    I am away on a contract and own my flat ie no mortgage.
    My insurance covers me for b and b guests.

    Can anyone tell me if I can legally rent my place out to friends and family for a few days each time?

    If I do this does it need to be PAT tested, fireproofed etc if I get them to sign a waiver?

    I just want to cover my council tax/insurance and perhaps a bit more.

    I want to keep the flat empty so I can also come back to it in my holidays. I looked to rent it out but the EA wants about £700 for networked fire/smoke detectors and PAT testing etc etc.

    Thanks for any help!
Page 1
    • mrginge
    • By mrginge 17th Jul 17, 8:09 PM
    • 4,262 Posts
    • 7,588 Thanks
    mrginge
    • #2
    • 17th Jul 17, 8:09 PM
    • #2
    • 17th Jul 17, 8:09 PM
    If I do this does it need to be PAT tested, fireproofed etc if I get them to sign a waiver?
    Originally posted by Jamessurfing
    no, you can't use contractual terms to override statutory regulations.



    I just want to cover my council tax/insurance and perhaps a bit more.

    I want to keep the flat empty so I can also come back to it in my holidays. I looked to rent it out but the EA wants about £700 for networked fire/smoke detectors and PAT testing etc etc.

    Thanks for any help!
    £700 ffs.
    Let me guess, Are they going to install them for you through one of their helpful contractors?
    Pat testing is not legally required afaik

    Go to b and q and then find another agent.
    • dimbo61
    • By dimbo61 17th Jul 17, 8:17 PM
    • 9,535 Posts
    • 5,162 Thanks
    dimbo61
    • #3
    • 17th Jul 17, 8:17 PM
    • #3
    • 17th Jul 17, 8:17 PM
    Smoke alarms in main rooms and bedrooms £10-15 each
    CO alarm about £18-20 for each room with GAS so where boiler is ( if gas)
    Gas fire? Gas hob/oven in kitchen.
    You should have them in your home already.
    Gas safe certificate, and have the electrics inspected and report done.
    Landlord insurance

    http://www.screwfix.com/p/fireangel-co-9b-co-alarm-led-display/25134?kpid=25134&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIgNzV_4OR1QIVxp3 tCh05igc_EAQYASABEgKCZ_D_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds&dclid=CJ XdgYKEkdUCFVCg7QodLJ8B5g

    http://www.screwfix.com/p/fireangel-tst-620q-10-year-thermoptek-smoke-alarm-2-pack/42801
    • G_M
    • By G_M 17th Jul 17, 8:32 PM
    • 41,883 Posts
    • 48,469 Thanks
    G_M
    • #4
    • 17th Jul 17, 8:32 PM
    • #4
    • 17th Jul 17, 8:32 PM
    For a let property under an AST (other than a HMO), a CO alarm is only legally required if there is solid fuel, not for gas (though it's sensible to have a CO detector).

    PAT testing not strictly required, though the electrics must be safe.

    What Im unsure about is the status of your friends/family if they stay there in your absence. That's not a 'B&B' is it? If you're not there, who provides their breakfast? And they'd be getting 'exclusive occupation'.

    So they might become tenants with an AST and hence 6 months security.

    Or is this akin to a 'holiday let' for which, again, I'm unsure of the criteria and regs.
    • Jamessurfing
    • By Jamessurfing 17th Jul 17, 8:46 PM
    • 23 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    Jamessurfing
    • #5
    • 17th Jul 17, 8:46 PM
    • #5
    • 17th Jul 17, 8:46 PM
    Ok thanks for information,
    sure the estate agent is full of $$$$ i'm sure.
    Yes I have smoke/fire detectors in all rooms, but they swear now a networked system is needed.

    To be honest, Im fed up of $$$$$ coming to my place and quoting ridiculous amounts, when they clearly can see I am someone who does not beleive what they say. Same with a blind quote £400. Never called them back.

    Sure will look into holiday let status also.
    • dotchas
    • By dotchas 17th Jul 17, 11:09 PM
    • 2,376 Posts
    • 3,403 Thanks
    dotchas
    • #6
    • 17th Jul 17, 11:09 PM
    • #6
    • 17th Jul 17, 11:09 PM
    Are you in Scotland? Where mains operated smoke alarms are required
    I love bargains
    I love MSE
    • DCFC79
    • By DCFC79 18th Jul 17, 9:52 AM
    • 30,268 Posts
    • 19,148 Thanks
    DCFC79
    • #7
    • 18th Jul 17, 9:52 AM
    • #7
    • 18th Jul 17, 9:52 AM
    You could contact another EA and ask re PAT being needed.
    Can people stop loaning money/being a guarator to family/friends, it rarely ends well and you lose out as your money is gone or you get shafted with being a guarantor.
    • Jamessurfing
    • By Jamessurfing 18th Jul 17, 10:25 AM
    • 23 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    Jamessurfing
    • #8
    • 18th Jul 17, 10:25 AM
    • #8
    • 18th Jul 17, 10:25 AM
    Hi Dotchas, yes I am.
    I guess why the heft price tag?
    • gld73
    • By gld73 18th Jul 17, 11:21 PM
    • 196 Posts
    • 120 Thanks
    gld73
    • #9
    • 18th Jul 17, 11:21 PM
    • #9
    • 18th Jul 17, 11:21 PM
    Having recently bought a flat in Scotland to rent out, the £700 you were quoted isn't necessarily unreasonable - I'd rented out property in England before and have found it a much more expensive process in Scotland. Despite it just being a studio flat, the work to install hardwired interlinked smoke and heat detectors, do PAT testing of all white goods and anything else vaguely portable (e.g. panel heaters and heated shower towel rail), some other work required to pass the EICR, and then the EICR itself (£180 plus VAT just to get the certificate on top of all the work!), cost a little bit more than that.

    None of the work would have been required if it had been a property in England. (Default advice on this board will be from an English perspective, so as there are are significant differences between English and Scottish law when it comes to property matters, you need to specify if it's in Scotland).
    • Mossfarr
    • By Mossfarr 19th Jul 17, 10:13 AM
    • 428 Posts
    • 566 Thanks
    Mossfarr
    Have a look how airbnb works, it might be a better option for you.
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