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    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 27th Apr 05, 3:54 PM
    • 13,811 Posts
    • 15,845 Thanks
    squeaky
    Somewhere on this site there is a pointer to all the information you could need on water meters and links to check (roughly) if you might be better off. I'm blowed if I can remember its location right now, but if I find a spare minute or two I'll have a look for it.

    Edit: Found it:- Saving Water
    Last edited by squeaky; 27-04-2005 at 3:59 PM.
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = £5.20 Apr £0.50
  • gaggyball
    Water meter
    Hi all,

    I have been following the debate about water meters and the general consenus is that they should save money?

    I have just had mine fitted by Servern Trent and will keep you posted on my bills.
    • margaretclare
    • By margaretclare 12th May 05, 7:14 PM
    • 10,263 Posts
    • 17,052 Thanks
    margaretclare
    Hi

    I had a water meter installed 12 or 13 years ago. I had to pay for it over 2 years, but the cost has been repaid many times over.

    I lived alone for 5 years and in that time was away a lot - I'd have been paying for water I never used, tied to the council tax band 'C'. Even since there have been 2 of us, since 1997, we use showers instead of baths, washing-machine twice a week, and we're paying £4.39 a month for water and £11 a month for sewerage.

    The only time a water meter would NOT pay for itself is if you had a large family, washing machine going daily, showers and baths all the time. With a meter you pay for what you use! Otherwise, you have no control over it - it's tied to the council tax band.

    Aunty Margaret
    • Bennifred
    • By Bennifred 12th May 05, 8:36 PM
    • 3,873 Posts
    • 7,946 Thanks
    Bennifred
    We were switched to a meter about 4 years ago, and were very worried as are high consumers (me, OH, 3 teenage boys, - washing machine permanently in use, power showers, etc etc). I kept a close eye for that first year, as we were given the option of switching back, but it was quite a lot cheaper and continues to be so. We still wash cars (well, the boys do when they run out of readies :rolleyes: ), water the garden etc.
    [
    • Cardew
    • By Cardew 12th May 05, 9:09 PM
    • 27,007 Posts
    • 13,129 Thanks
    Cardew
    Hi

    Otherwise, you have no control over it - it's tied to the council tax band.

    Aunty Margaret
    by margaretclare
    I don't think it is!

    Unmetered water charges are tied to the Rateable Value which ceased in 1989.
    • Miss Behaving
    • By Miss Behaving 16th May 05, 6:39 AM
    • 315 Posts
    • 883 Thanks
    Miss Behaving
    Hi, I moved into my house exactly one year ago and must admit that I was very aprehensive because it had a water meter already fitted.

    My old house was council band D and had I stayed there it would have cost me £258.38 a year for an unmetered supply (£25.91 a month). I have just had a look though my metered water bills and have only paid £133.67 for the whole year! That's a saving of £124.71 and my new house is band F so I dred to think what an unmetered supply would cost.

    There are two adults and two children in the house and the washing machine and diswasher seem to be permanently on! Last summer we even got the kids a 10ft pool which was filled up twice and the bill was still less than an unmetered supply.

    Our supplier is South East Water and if you go to their website they have a calculator so that you can work out if you would be better off with a metered supply.
    www.southeastwater.co.uk.
  • Jackiekaren
    Definately worth it if single
    I'm living alone and was paying £10 a month on my meter. I got a bill stating I was £47 in credit! So I asked for a refund and they lowered my monthly payment to £8. Great!

    I only use the shower, and don't wash clothes until I have a full load.

    Definately worth it in my case.
    • chiny
    • By chiny 8th Jun 05, 6:05 PM
    • 73 Posts
    • 21 Thanks
    chiny
    As this is a money saving board, surely everyone has checked their own particular circumstances. It is easy with the various web sites (one linked earlier in this thread) and various calculators provided by water companies. It is a 10 minute job starting from scratch, armed with a simple calculator or spreadsheet.

    Like many (most ? ) here, I tackled water, gas, elec, phone bills etc when I moved in. My water bill dropped from £650/year to £200/year by going metered.

    Now you have saved so much, how about making a donation to Water Aid http://www.wateraid.org.uk/ for those much less fortunate. A child has died of a water related disease while you read this post.

    --
    Chiny
  • olderthanhelooks
    Just to dispel a myth, we are a family of 2 adults and 3 children who are not very frugal with water. Although my wife and I shower, the rest take baths. We put the dishwasher on once a day and the washing machine at least once as well.

    We recently installed a meter and will save approx £150 this year. We are on council tax band F. Therefore if you are on a high council tax band, you are almost certain to save money by having a water meter.
  • Art
    Water Meter
    If you contact your water company they will send you a calculator so that you can work out how much water you use and if it would be sensible to have a meter.

    In general families would be better off not having a meter. The break-even point is about 2 people in a household.

    It's also worth remembering that once you have a meter installed you can't change back again so it's important to make the right decision.

    Regards,
    Art.
  • doozeruk
    Agree with Art above.

    My household consists of 2 adults and 3 children under 6. I live in a modest 3 bed semi and our water is still on rateable value. Our yearly bill is around £240 a year.

    Five years ago I lived in a smaller and cheaper property (albeit newer) and at that time we only had one child, our water was metered and we paid around £440 a year, so as a family we are much better off. I wouldn't even consider switching to a meter as a largish family.

    My sister who lives in a new 3 bed property is on a meter, one child and a husband and there bill is almost £400 a year too! It doesn't work for everyone, I blamed our shower, it was one of those fed from the bath taps type (not the naff ones!), my sister has one also. There like turning both taps on for a bath but then standing in the shower/bath for 10 minutes........waste of water.
  • Robert5988
    In general families would be better off not having a meter. The break-even point is about 2 people in a household.

    It's also worth remembering that once you have a meter installed you can't change back again so it's important to make the right decision.

    Regards,
    Art.
    by Art
    That break-even statement is really is far too simplistic.

    Firstly the way charges are levied on both metered and unmetered vary greatly according to the Water Company covering each area.

    However the biggest factor is the rateable value(RV) of your property. A low RV and several people in the house will generally mean that you are better off unmetered. However there are plenty of threads in this forum that indicate that many(most?) families are better off changing to metered - often by consideable amounts.

    Also from these forums I understand that you have a year to change your mind and revert to unmetered if you wish.
    Robert
  • jimjoeray
    Savings
    I have recently converted to a meter and my monthly direct debit has gone from £42 to £23. I have a family and I am in council tax band F. The savings are considerable. I would advise anyone to have one fitted (free) and if it does not work out cheaper just tell the company you no longer wish to use it.
  • RoyH
    I am just about to go over to a meter as Seven Trent have calculated I will save £200+ PA on our bill. Note: Without a meter your bill are based on your ratable value not usage. Large house low occupancy = paying too much.
  • jockettuk
    Waste water? Even when in the shower, which is in my bath, I put the plug in. The water gets scooped out of the bath and put to use in the garden.
    by squeaky
    why not get one of those water butts that you connect to your downpipe would be alot easier lol
    Those we love don't go away,They walk beside us every day,Unseen, unheard, but always near,
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    Our thoughts are ever with you,Though you have passed away.And those who loved you dearly,
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  • scissors
    HI everyone this is my first post, hope it will be some use.
    We are customers of Yorkshire water and before we swaped to a meter in Oct 03, our water rates were £358pa. By using the water calculator on the energywatch website we found our family of 3 would be considerably better off on a meter even after putting topspin on our projected usage. From initial contact with YW it only took 3 weeks to be online with the meter. In our case we got a bonus, with new cushion floor for free. This was because the fitter ripped our old floor covering while pulling out the dishwasher to fit the meter.
    Our bills are less than half what they used to be, initially we were cautious with the use but now we dont even think about it. In our case its been one of our better financial decisions.
    • morlandbanks
    • By morlandbanks 13th Jun 05, 3:33 PM
    • 249 Posts
    • 236 Thanks
    morlandbanks
    Want my unmetered bills back!!
    I have recently moved house and apparently Three Valleys Water are now legally entitled to install a water meter if there is a change of occupation at a property. Well that's great, but now that we are a family of 4 with a dishwasher, my bills will be a small fortune!!
    I want a refund for all the years I was single and paying the full charge!!
    I am quite careful not to waste water or energy actually, have one of those gizmos in the loo so I don't waste water - always wash a full load, use waste water from cooking to water the garden etc, but if anyone can give me anymore ideas, I'd be grateful. Only one I've had from a friend is to use my bathwater to wash my car with. Thanks, but I save water by taking a shower and um, WASH the car?! Without the dirt holding all the parts together it might fall apart!!

    Yours in search of top tips

    A moneysavingexpert.com worshiper!
    Live as if your were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever - Mahatma Gandhi
  • dag
    The thing that bothers me with water meters is - what happens when your next door neighbour is disconnected due to non-payment of water bills?

    Back in Victorian times, there used to be street pumps. If your water was cut off, it wasn't a major problem, you could just go to the pump with your bucket. The Broad Street pump was disconnected in 1854 to contain a cholera outbreak, but again, this wasn't a major problem, because there were other pumps in other streets nearby.

    Nowadays, there are hardly any street pumps.

    If someone gets disconnected from water today, they can't go to a street pump. So they usually go to their next door neighbour instead.

    Living next door to someone who doesn't have running water is a scary thought. Without water, your neighbour can't flush his toilets, have a bath, or launder his clothes. After a while, they will start to smell, and diseases might start festering. You don't want to run the risk of catching those diseases yourself.

    That's why neighbours are usually quick to help out if you've had your water cut off.

    However, if you've got a meter, you're caught between a rock and a hard place. You still don't want to run the risk of catching disease from your neighbour - but on the other hand, you resent paying for your next door neighbour's volumetric water usage when you're paying for your own usage as well.

    But the water authorities don't care about this. They only want to make a profit.

    I read somewhere that most complaints about disconnection don't come from the resident who get disconnected - they come from neighbours, who are worried about the public health risks.

    The water companies often tell us that water meters encourage people to conserve water - but I don't believe that. I believe that rich people will continue to use water in just the same way as before - however, poor people will comprimise their health and hygiene standards to save water, for fear of not being able to pay the bill.

    Most of the people who are better off with water meters are those in large houses with low occupancy - and, without putting too fine a point on it, these aren't exactly the people I'm describing as "poor".
    • isayoldchap
    • By isayoldchap 24th Jul 05, 8:24 AM
    • 1,249 Posts
    • 388 Thanks
    isayoldchap
    Water meter savings?
    I have read Martin's information on water meters and seen the possible savings from buy.co.uk.As we have Southern Water that supplies (currently £98.27 pa u/m and Thames that take it away (currently £88.02 pa u/m)Will the savings only work on the supplier.The estimated bill with buy worked out to £79.30.It said we use around 14m3 of water.We are a four family.Some info it asks per week
    Toilet flushes-100
    Standard shower-32
    Running taps-200 (inc each toilet visit and hands before and after meals)
    Washing machine-6 full loads
    Dishwashing-by hand-18
    Lawn-350mins
    Plants-24 cans

    They do not mention general cleaning or water used for cooking.We have added 10% into the other calc.above for this.We buy bottled water at the supermarket for drinking.

    Their calculation seemed very cheap.But as I mentioned above,would I get a sewerage calculation seperate.Or could I be onto making a saving here of
    £106 approx?

    When they do a site survey,wouldn't the customer just be told he must have a water meter fitted as you are using a sprinkler?I guess they would not remove it then if you find you are using more than when you were unmetered.
    Your views would be most welcomed before we venture off on our holidays.
  • Art
    Water Meter

    Their calculation seemed very cheap.But as I mentioned above,would I get a sewerage calculation seperate.Or could I be onto making a saving here of
    £106 approx?

    When they do a site survey,wouldn't the customer just be told he must have a water meter fitted as you are using a sprinkler?I guess they would not remove it then if you find you are using more than when you were unmetered.
    Your views would be most welcomed before we venture off on our holidays.
    by isayoldchap
    There is a seperate charge for sewage. This will appear as a seperate item on your water bill under 'sewage'.

    Regards,
    Art.
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