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  • helloworld1
    • #2
    • 23rd Jun 12, 3:35 PM
    • #2
    • 23rd Jun 12, 3:35 PM
    Hi, I am on JSA but I have found some 'part-time' work however the working times are quite inconsistent each week and depends if there is any work available or not. I will probably sign off and still claim housing benefit if that is possible, as I will be always working under 16 hours per week, earning minimum wage.
    Now I talked to the housing office and she told me I have to fill out how many hours I will be doing (and with a forecast of two months). But, I don't know exactly how many hours it will be each week! Most jobs are on a 'first-come-first-serve' basis and what is available.. so how can I fill out the forms, and how can my employer fill out the forms?
    Best, C
  • Kay.Samuels
    • #3
    • 23rd Jun 12, 3:49 PM
    • #3
    • 23rd Jun 12, 3:49 PM
    I have a quick question about housing benefit if anyone can help?

    I may be starting a new job soon (fingers crossed) - is there an agency I can go to or a tool I can use to find out how much, if any HB I will be entitled to whilst in new job? My lone parent advisor at the job centre used to calculate during a better off in work calculation but a friend in the same circumstances as me has been told by job centre they won't do this anymore for housing benefit and so she is simply waiting to find out how much or nothing when her new claim award comes through.

    I would prefer to know so I can calculate my finances and be sure I can manage before starting a new job. Is this possible?
    It is only a bargain if you need it!
  • mynameistallulah
    • #4
    • 23rd Jun 12, 3:56 PM
    • #4
    • 23rd Jun 12, 3:56 PM
    Hi, I am on JSA but I have found some 'part-time' work however the working times are quite inconsistent each week and depends if there is any work available or not. I will probably sign off and still claim housing benefit if that is possible, as I will be always working under 16 hours per week, earning minimum wage.
    Now I talked to the housing office and she told me I have to fill out how many hours I will be doing (and with a forecast of two months). But, I don't know exactly how many hours it will be each week! Most jobs are on a 'first-come-first-serve' basis and what is available.. so how can I fill out the forms, and how can my employer fill out the forms?
    Best, C
    Originally posted by helloworld1
    You will have to give an estimate at first, but this will be reviewed at regular interviews and your entitlement adjusted to reflect any under/ overpayment.

    I have a quick question about housing benefit if anyone can help?

    I may be starting a new job soon (fingers crossed) - is there an agency I can go to or a tool I can use to find out how much, if any HB I will be entitled to whilst in new job? My lone parent advisor at the job centre used to calculate during a better off in work calculation but a friend in the same circumstances as me has been told by job centre they won't do this anymore for housing benefit and so she is simply waiting to find out how much or nothing when her new claim award comes through.

    I would prefer to know so I can calculate my finances and be sure I can manage before starting a new job. Is this possible?
    Originally posted by Kay.Samuels
    Your council's website will have an entitlement calculator on there, or you can look at Turn2Us for an estimate.
  • CAB Wyre Forest representative
    • #5
    • 25th Jun 12, 9:42 AM
    • #5
    • 25th Jun 12, 9:42 AM
    I have a quick question about housing benefit if anyone can help?

    I may be starting a new job soon (fingers crossed) - is there an agency I can go to or a tool I can use to find out how much, if any HB I will be entitled to whilst in new job? My lone parent advisor at the job centre used to calculate during a better off in work calculation but a friend in the same circumstances as me has been told by job centre they won't do this anymore for housing benefit and so she is simply waiting to find out how much or nothing when her new claim award comes through.

    I would prefer to know so I can calculate my finances and be sure I can manage before starting a new job. Is this possible?
    Originally posted by Kay.Samuels
    Hello Key.Samuels
    We recommend using Turn2Us for estimating benefit entitlement - go to http://www.turn2us.entitledto.co.uk/ and complete the questionnaire.
    Please note that Housing Benefit entitlement is limited by your local housing Allowance - you will need to contact your local authority either in person or on line.
    Good luck with the new job
    Official CAB Representative
    I am an official representative of CAB. MSE has given permission for me to post in response to questions on the CAB Board. You can see my name on the companies with permission to post list. If you believe I’ve broken any rules please report my post to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com as usual"
  • CAB Wyre Forest representative
    • #6
    • 25th Jun 12, 12:20 PM
    • #6
    • 25th Jun 12, 12:20 PM
    Hi, I am on JSA but I have found some 'part-time' work however the working times are quite inconsistent each week and depends if there is any work available or not. I will probably sign off and still claim housing benefit if that is possible, as I will be always working under 16 hours per week, earning minimum wage.
    Now I talked to the housing office and she told me I have to fill out how many hours I will be doing (and with a forecast of two months). But, I don't know exactly how many hours it will be each week! Most jobs are on a 'first-come-first-serve' basis and what is available.. so how can I fill out the forms, and how can my employer fill out the forms?
    Best, C
    Originally posted by helloworld1
    Hi
    I'm afraid that you will have to make your best estimate. It might be wise to avoid being too pessimistic on the hours you will work as this may lead to you having to repay some of the benefit.
    Some of your income is "disregarded" -see below:
    "The standard earnings disregard and the permitted work earnings disregard are as follows.Single people £5, Couples - one working £10, both working £10, Lone parent £25." The rules about disregards are potentially complex. If you find that you do not get the benefit you were expecting then you might need to visit your local CAB office for more detailed advice.
    Good luck
    Official CAB Representative
    I am an official representative of CAB. MSE has given permission for me to post in response to questions on the CAB Board. You can see my name on the companies with permission to post list. If you believe I’ve broken any rules please report my post to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com as usual"
  • clouty
    • #7
    • 25th Jun 12, 4:57 PM
    • #7
    • 25th Jun 12, 4:57 PM
    My neighbour has been renting her flat, and has been in receipt of housing benefit, since 2004. She is now on JSA though she used to be on WTC, unfortunately she lost her job. Her landlord bumped the rent up by £100 a month a bit over a year ago, and she's having to try and meet top-up payments of £28 a week out of her JSA, which as you can imagine is difficult, not least because the Job Centre are also taking £15 a week for a crisis loan she had a while ago. The poor woman is so thin!

    I came across this information on DirectGov:
    http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/moneytaxandbenefits/benefitstaxcreditsandothersupport/on_a_low_income/dg_10018928

    If you have been getting Housing Benefit since before 7 April 2008, the Local Housing Allowance will only apply to you if you:
    change address
    have a break in your claim
    neither of which apply. Does this mean that she is eligible for the full amount of the rent on her flat? She cannot see how she could find a cheaper place, and does not want to dislocate her son. She is no longer in receipt of Child Benefit for him, as he is now over eighteen, but he still lives with her.

    Thanks for any advice you can give on this matter.
    may your good days grow
    • daimonde
    • By daimonde 25th Jun 12, 5:15 PM
    • 199 Posts
    • 203 Thanks
    daimonde
    • #8
    • 25th Jun 12, 5:15 PM
    • #8
    • 25th Jun 12, 5:15 PM
    My neighbour has been renting her flat, and has been in receipt of housing benefit, since 2004. She is now on JSA though she used to be on WTC, unfortunately she lost her job. Her landlord bumped the rent up by £100 a month a bit over a year ago, and she's having to try and meet top-up payments of £28 a week out of her JSA, which as you can imagine is difficult, not least because the Job Centre are also taking £15 a week for a crisis loan she had a while ago. The poor woman is so thin!

    I came across this information on DirectGov:
    http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/moneytaxandbenefits/benefitstaxcreditsandothersupport/on_a_low_income/dg_10018928



    neither of which apply. Does this mean that she is eligible for the full amount of the rent on her flat? She cannot see how she could find a cheaper place, and does not want to dislocate her son. She is no longer in receipt of Child Benefit for him, as he is now over eighteen, but he still lives with her.

    Thanks for any advice you can give on this matter.
    Originally posted by clouty

    Not being assessed under LHA for a private tenant probably means the rent is set by the Rent Office, which no, doesnt automatically mean 'full benefit', the figures ive seen (not too many admittedly) coming back from the rent office for claims in my area tend to be very similar to LHA rates anyway. This may account for some of the shortfall.

    If her son is working, it could well be that that £28 shortfall is a non-dependant deduction, the second tier of deductions is £26.25pw - this would be if he is earning £124 - £182.99.
    • enabledebra
    • By enabledebra 25th Jun 12, 8:53 PM
    • 7,395 Posts
    • 10,909 Thanks
    enabledebra
    • #9
    • 25th Jun 12, 8:53 PM
    • #9
    • 25th Jun 12, 8:53 PM
    Hi, I am on JSA but I have found some 'part-time' work however the working times are quite inconsistent each week and depends if there is any work available or not. I will probably sign off and still claim housing benefit if that is possible, as I will be always working under 16 hours per week, earning minimum wage.
    Now I talked to the housing office and she told me I have to fill out how many hours I will be doing (and with a forecast of two months). But, I don't know exactly how many hours it will be each week! Most jobs are on a 'first-come-first-serve' basis and what is available.. so how can I fill out the forms, and how can my employer fill out the forms?
    Best, C
    Originally posted by helloworld1

    In addition to the information you have been given abouthousing benefit, you should think carefully about not ‘signing off’ JSA. If you will be working under 16 hours atminimum wage you aren’t going to earn enough to pay or be credited withNational Insurance Credits through your work.

    Those working under 16 hours can still sign on and thiswould protect your NI contribution record re your pension etc. See here for more details http://taxaid.org.uk/info/national-insurance/national-insurance-for-employees-and-employers/national-insurance-thresholds.

    At minimum wage, on a rough estimate, you might also qualifyfor some level of payment of JSA for those periods you work under 12 hours. Being paid JSA also means you are entitled tohelp with the dentist /optician/prescriptions. Otherwise you should consider filling an HC1 form for help with these costson a low wage http://www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/1125.aspx,

    The above is based on an assumption that you are single,without dependents and aged over 21. The info might be different if that assumption is wrong.
  • helloworld1
    Hello
    I am single, over 21 and with non-dependents. The thing is, I want to sign off JSA!
    Can you please explain the term 'disregard' in relation to tye numbers (£5??) as well please, dear advisor?

    So even though I have found some part time work, it is still advisable to contine signing on? If I do not earn much, what do I have to pay else other than NI contributions? I thought that will be deducted from my wage or do i have to pay them separately? Am I also exempt from council tax?

    I am desperately trying to find some more stable part time work, will it be such a problem if it is not full time work (which i cant find at the moment)

    Best, c
    • enabledebra
    • By enabledebra 25th Jun 12, 11:46 PM
    • 7,395 Posts
    • 10,909 Thanks
    enabledebra
    No you won't have to pay national insurance at that wage level- that's good for your pocket now but bad (potentially) for your pension. When you don't earn enough to eiher pay NI or be 'credited' with paying NI through work you should see if you can get NI credits from somewhere else. in your case you can get them from signing on. I can't view the thread whilst posting but £5 disregard means that any benefits which take into account how much you are earning will ignore £5 of those earnings - pretend you are getting £5 less than you are really paid. You are not exempt from getting a council tax bill but because of low earnings you should get council tax benefit to pay some or all of it.

    Finding part time work is a fantastic thing to do for your future prospects and it's not a problem financially - you will not be worse off if you access all the help you could get. You need to still sign on to make sure you get the most support financially now and when you retire. What you choose to do is up to you of course- this isn't advice just info to look into.
    • aptgirl
    • By aptgirl 26th Jun 12, 2:29 AM
    • 13 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    aptgirl
    Hi
    I have moved into this council flat about a year ago. There are 2 bedrooms, one is for me and another is for the landlord. He is away most of the time, only come back around every few months. I was under impression this flat was bought my the landlord when I first moved in, then soon I was awared by the neighbours that this flat is actually rented by my landlord from the council, and the amount of rent I am paying my landlord per month is in fact exactly the same amount that council charges my landlord everymonth.Since I had been busy and never got chance to talk my landlord(he is away all the time), until the other day, a lady from housing office came wanted to talk to my landlord, left a letter. The letter ( I had permission from my landlord to open the letter) basically pointed out that they had found out that I am the one living in the flat rather than my landlord. I told him about the letter and asked for explaination, he then told to me I am just a "lodger" here rather than a tenant, which means whatever he did is legal and resonable. What makes me very confused is the contract I signed with him was a "tenant agreement", I was signed as a tenant; also I am paying rent for the whole flat. Now he is asking for my next month's rent, shall I pay him or not? I feel that I had been used in this situation, since clearly he is just playing with the concept "lodger". What shall I do about this?

    Thanks for reading this long story =) Please do advice me what to do next.
  • CAB Wyre Forest representative
    Housing Benefit - non-dependant deductions
    My neighbour has been renting her flat, and has been in receipt of housing benefit, since 2004. She is now on JSA though she used to be on WTC, unfortunately she lost her job. Her landlord bumped the rent up by £100 a month a bit over a year ago, and she's having to try and meet top-up payments of £28 a week out of her JSA, which as you can imagine is difficult, not least because the Job Centre are also taking £15 a week for a crisis loan she had a while ago. The poor woman is so thin!

    I came across this information on DirectGov:
    http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/moneytaxandbenefits/benefitstaxcreditsandothersupport/on_a_low_income/dg_10018928



    neither of which apply. Does this mean that she is eligible for the full amount of the rent on her flat? She cannot see how she could find a cheaper place, and does not want to dislocate her son. She is no longer in receipt of Child Benefit for him, as he is now over eighteen, but he still lives with her.

    Thanks for any advice you can give on this matter.
    Originally posted by clouty

    Dear clouty,
    This is a quote from our website
    http://www.adviceguide.org.uk/england/benefits_e/benefits_help_if_on_a_low_income_ew/help_with_your_rent_-_housing_benefit.htm
    You applied for Housing Benefit before 7 April 2008

    If you're the tenant of a private landlord and you applied for Housing Benefit before 7 April 2008, there are different rules about how Housing Benefit decisions are made. However, this may still mean that not all your rent is covered. How much of your rent Housing Benefit can cover is decided by a rent officer. Instead of using the Local Housing Allowance rules, they look at the rent you pay and decide whether it is reasonable for Housing Benefit to cover all the rent. This depends on a number of things, including how much your rent is compared with other similar properties in the area and whether the accommodation is the right size for your needs. From 1 January 2012, if you're under 35 and single with no children, the rent officer compares your rent with the market rent for a single room with shared facilities. However, some people are exempt from this, for example, care leavers under 22, some disabled people and people aged 25 to 34 who have been living in a homeless hostel. The local authority works out how much Housing Benefit you're entitled to based on the rent officer's decision.
    If the amount of Housing Benefit you are entitled to doesn't cover all your rent, you may have to make up the difference out of any other income you have, or find cheaper accommodation. You may be able to get further help with housing costs.
    If you applied for Housing Benefit before 7 April 2008, you can challenge a rent officer’s decision if you think it's wrong, for example, if there is no cheaper accommodation in the area. You can't appeal directly to the rent officer, but you can ask the local authority to ask the rent office to review their decision.
    If you want to challenge a rent officer's decision, you should consult an experienced adviser, for example, at a Citizens Advice Bureau. To search for details of your nearest CAB, including those that can give advice by email, click on nearest CAB.


    Other Housing Benefit restrictions

    Adults who live in someone else’s home

    An adult who lives in your home and who is not a tenant or boarder, other than your partner, is called a non-dependant. For example, you might have a friend, parent, grown-up son or daughter or another relative living with you. If you have a non-dependant living in your home, an amount will usually be deducted from your Housing Benefit on the assumption that they could give you some money towards the costs of accommodation, even if they do not do so. The amount of the deduction depends on their circumstances.
    If you were living with someone as a non-dependant, and then you enter into an agreement to pay rent while they are still living there, you may not be able to get Housing Benefit towards that rent, unless you can show that the arrangement was not set up in order to get Housing Benefit.
    If you have a non-dependant living in your home, or you are a former non-dependant and you want to claim Housing Benefit, you should consult an experienced adviser, for example, at a Citizens Advice Bureau. To search for details of your nearest CAB, including those that can give advice by email, click on nearest CAB.
    Official CAB Representative
    I am an official representative of CAB. MSE has given permission for me to post in response to questions on the CAB Board. You can see my name on the companies with permission to post list. If you believe I’ve broken any rules please report my post to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com as usual"
  • CAB Wyre Forest representative
    Hello
    I am single, over 21 and with non-dependents. The thing is, I want to sign off JSA!
    Can you please explain the term 'disregard' in relation to tye numbers (£5??) as well please, dear advisor?

    So even though I have found some part time work, it is still advisable to contine signing on? If I do not earn much, what do I have to pay else other than NI contributions? I thought that will be deducted from my wage or do i have to pay them separately? Am I also exempt from council tax?

    I am desperately trying to find some more stable part time work, will it be such a problem if it is not full time work (which i cant find at the moment)

    Best, c
    Originally posted by helloworld1
    Dear helloworld1,
    We use this website to explore benefit entitlements:
    http://www.turn2us.entitledto.co.uk/entitlementcalculator.aspx
    If you create an account, you can tinker with the values you enter and see exactly which scenario leaves you 'better off'.
    The website is run by the charity Elizabeth Finn.
    Hope this helps
    Official CAB Representative
    I am an official representative of CAB. MSE has given permission for me to post in response to questions on the CAB Board. You can see my name on the companies with permission to post list. If you believe I’ve broken any rules please report my post to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com as usual"
  • CAB Wyre Forest representative
    Hi
    Originally posted by aptgirl
    I have moved into this council flat about a year ago. There are 2 bedrooms, one is for me and another is for the landlord. He is away most of the time, only come back around every few months. I was under impression this flat was bought my the landlord when I first moved in, then soon I was awared by the neighbours that this flat is actually rented by my landlord from the council, and the amount of rent I am paying my landlord per month is in fact exactly the same amount that council charges my landlord everymonth.Since I had been busy and never got chance to talk my landlord(he is away all the time), until the other day, a lady from housing office came wanted to talk to my landlord, left a letter. The letter ( I had permission from my landlord to open the letter) basically pointed out that they had found out that I am the one living in the flat rather than my landlord. I told him about the letter and asked for explaination, he then told to me I am just a "lodger" here rather than a tenant, which means whatever he did is legal and resonable. What makes me very confused is the contract I signed with him was a "tenant agreement", I was signed as a tenant; also I am paying rent for the whole flat. Now he is asking for my next month's rent, shall I pay him or not? I feel that I had been used in this situation, since clearly he is just playing with the concept "lodger". What shall I do about this?

    Thanks for reading this long story =) Please do advice me what to do next.
    Originally posted by aptgirl


    Dear aptgirl,
    You can use Shelter's tenancy checker to see if you're a tenant or a license holder:
    http://england.shelter.org.uk/get_advice/downloads_and_tools/tenancy_checker

    What kind of agreement (tenancy) you have with your landlord affects your legal rights. These rights depend on who you rent from, when your agreement started and whether your landlord lives in the same building - not just what your agreement says.

    If you rent your house or part of a house from someone who in turn rents the property from a different landlord, then you are a subtenant.

    If you share any living space with your landlord you are likely to be an excluded occupier, which gives you almost no protection from eviction so it will be very difficult to enforce any other rights.

    Before CAB give housing advice we determine your 'vulnerability to eviction'. It may be that you are as described above: an excluded occupier and, therefore, quite vulnerable to eviction.

    You might want to phone the experts, Shelter, on
    0808-800-4444 if you’re worried about the legality of your arrangement.

    Hope this helps
    Official CAB Representative
    I am an official representative of CAB. MSE has given permission for me to post in response to questions on the CAB Board. You can see my name on the companies with permission to post list. If you believe I’ve broken any rules please report my post to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com as usual"
  • Skintslimmer
    Hi there,

    I was recently made redundant from a part time job, finished a full time degree course, and I now need to apply for JSA and housing benefit. I am a tennant in a house share with one other person, in a 3 bedroomed property. I pay X amount per month which includes all bills, and I have had trouble getting any confirmation of my redundancy. Do I need that in order to apply for housing benefit?
    Nothing tastes as good as riding a horse feels
  • advance
    I am in my late 30's unable to hold down even a part time job due to mental health problems following a road traffic accident, I have savings just over 16,000.00 from when I was able to work full time so this takes me over the savings amount for housing benefit.

    I have been living on my parents sofa for a number of years since I became ill and am desperate to move out as it is making my health worse.

    I receive incapacity benefit, nothing else so could possibly afford to cover rent but would have no money coming in for household bills, gas, water, electric, food etc.

    I haven't been able to work in eight years and can't afford to loose the only money I have been able to save through my life as it was from a time when my health was ok and will never be able to save that sort of money again.

    Is there any help anywhere I can get as I am feeling really trapped and depressed at the moment.

    Thanks
  • CAB Wyre Forest representative
    Dear Skintslimmer
    Hi there,

    I was recently made redundant from a part time job, finished a full time degree course, and I now need to apply for JSA and housing benefit. I am a tennant in a house share with one other person, in a 3 bedroomed property. I pay X amount per month which includes all bills, and I have had trouble getting any confirmation of my redundancy. Do I need that in order to apply for housing benefit?
    Originally posted by Skintslimmer
    Dear skintslimmer.
    Here is link to the housing benefit claim form HCTB1 on the Direct Gov website
    http://www.dwp.gov.uk/advisers/claimforms/hctb1_print.pdf

    You will see on page 3 that it says -
    Your local council will need to see proof of some of the things you write about on the form. There is a checklist in Part 15 of the form to help you. If you are not sure if your council needs to see proof of something, get in touch with them. They will tell you what they need to see. They cannot pay you benefit until they have seen the proof they need.

    Hope this helps.
    Official CAB Representative
    I am an official representative of CAB. MSE has given permission for me to post in response to questions on the CAB Board. You can see my name on the companies with permission to post list. If you believe I’ve broken any rules please report my post to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com as usual"
  • CAB Wyre Forest representative
    I am in my late 30's unable to hold down even a part time job due to mental health problems following a road traffic accident, I have savings just over 16,000.00 from when I was able to work full time so this takes me over the savings amount for housing benefit.

    I have been living on my parents sofa for a number of years since I became ill and am desperate to move out as it is making my health worse.

    I receive incapacity benefit, nothing else so could possibly afford to cover rent but would have no money coming in for household bills, gas, water, electric, food etc.

    I haven't been able to work in eight years and can't afford to loose the only money I have been able to save through my life as it was from a time when my health was ok and will never be able to save that sort of money again.

    Is there any help anywhere I can get as I am feeling really trapped and depressed at the moment.

    Thanks
    Originally posted by advance
    Dear Advance,
    You say your savings are just above £16,00, once your saving are below £16,000 you may be eligible for housing benefit and council tax benefit.
    Take a look at the website below, on there you can put in your personal circumstances and what help you require. The search will return details of organisations that may be able to assist you. But you could also consider going along to your local CAB office and they could do this for you.

    http://www.turn2us.org.uk/grants_search/advanced.aspx
    Official CAB Representative
    I am an official representative of CAB. MSE has given permission for me to post in response to questions on the CAB Board. You can see my name on the companies with permission to post list. If you believe I’ve broken any rules please report my post to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com as usual"
  • garfieldd
    Possibly change in situation - son to live with me?
    I am a single working (full time) male for your information. This actually is a generic benefit enquiry that I may post in other areas asking for advice.

    It has almost been agreed that my son, aged 11 will come and live with me when and if I find a suitable property that will house both of us. Currently it is not possible for him to come and live with me as I am living in a rented room.

    I have middle rate DLA, and my son is in receipt of the middle rate care and lower rate DLA.

    I have had a benefit check if the above situation happens and it appears it is possible to rent privately with LHA supporting my income. Working/Child Tax Credits will also help.

    However, my issue is that he may be going to a specialist school from September (Year 7). I am wondering how it would affect his DLA and my Tax Credit as well as my Housing Benefits? He may be coming home every weekend as that is the reason he is coming to live with me, as he needs a father figure to discipline him and teach him life skills (his mother is on benefits and I am only thinking he is becoming too smart to cave in to her and answers back). His mother is not able to cope with 3 other young children (only two of the four are mine).
    • Here are my questions
    • How will my WTC/CTC be affected?
    • How will his DLA be affected?
    • How will my Housing Benefit be affected?
    • Is there anything else I should be aware of?
    Finally, how do I start with informing my council (which is a different council) to agree to my son to go to the specialist school which the other borough have already agreed to do? What is the process and how do I start if we decided to go ahead.

    Many thanks

    A
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