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  • FIRST POST
    katycloud
    Brick vs. Wood homes?
    • #1
    • 9th Jan 12, 7:14 AM
    Brick vs. Wood homes? 9th Jan 12 at 7:14 AM
    My partner and I are just about to purchase our very first home. We have began looking at houses, and the area we are wanting to buy in is a very leafy, 'bushy' kind of area (in the Dandenong Ranges if you're at all familiar with Australia!).

    We were originally set on buying a brick home, however there are lots of weatherboard and cedar wood houses in the area for sale which are also considerably cheaper. I am a bit put off by weatherboard/wood houses as I understand that they have poor insulation and are also a lot of maintenance as they need painting often. I am also worried about termite infestation (but that can occur in brick homes as well!)

    What are your opinions on brick vs. wood houses in the long run? If we limit ourselves to just brick, we are cutting back so many options as there are a plethora of weatherboard houses on the market in the area! The weatherboard/cedar wood houses are also considerably cheaper. Is there anything we should know about weatherboard houses? Pros cons? Any advice/experience would be greatly appreciated!

    (Oops just realised I should've posted this in the House Buying forum, moderators feel free to move it... sorry!)
    Last edited by katycloud; 09-01-2012 at 7:16 AM.
Page 1
    • Hintza
    • By Hintza 9th Jan 12, 8:34 AM
    • 18,846 Posts
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    Hintza
    • #2
    • 9th Jan 12, 8:34 AM
    • #2
    • 9th Jan 12, 8:34 AM
    Why do you need insulation? In Jo'burg we just froze for July and August.

    Personally I think you should be asking on an Australian forum for the pros and cons but if it is your first home how long will you live there so does it really matter? What are the price differences?
    Dis tyd om op te staan!
    • tightrs
    • By tightrs 9th Jan 12, 9:03 AM
    • 492 Posts
    • 181 Thanks
    tightrs
    • #3
    • 9th Jan 12, 9:03 AM
    • #3
    • 9th Jan 12, 9:03 AM
    based on the 3 little pigs story i would go with brick








    (sorry couldn't resist it)
    • pinkteapot
    • By pinkteapot 9th Jan 12, 9:04 AM
    • 6,105 Posts
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    pinkteapot
    • #4
    • 9th Jan 12, 9:04 AM
    • #4
    • 9th Jan 12, 9:04 AM
    Hi Katy - not sure if you're aware but this is a UK-based site so 99% of the posters are in the UK (or ex-pats living oversees). You're unlikely to find anyone who is expert in Australian home construction I'm afraid...
  • ormus
    • #5
    • 9th Jan 12, 12:06 PM
    • #5
    • 9th Jan 12, 12:06 PM
    and a timber domestic house is virtually unknown in the uk.
    Get some gorm.
    • HappyMJ
    • By HappyMJ 9th Jan 12, 12:10 PM
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    HappyMJ
    • #6
    • 9th Jan 12, 12:10 PM
    • #6
    • 9th Jan 12, 12:10 PM
    I'm from there originally....Ferntree Gully to be exact...You will find a brick and block built house in that area extremely rare. Most houses are built with wood with a brick outer layer. The wood is what holds the house up. The bricks do nothing. Don't worry about termites the wood is treated but do get a pest inspection if the house is more than 10 years old.

    Regular savers earn 6% interest (HSBC, First Direct, M&S) Loans cost 2.9% per year (Nationwide) = FREE money.
    • muckybutt
    • By muckybutt 9th Jan 12, 5:44 PM
    • 3,622 Posts
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    muckybutt
    • #7
    • 9th Jan 12, 5:44 PM
    • #7
    • 9th Jan 12, 5:44 PM
    and a timber domestic house is virtually unknown in the uk.
    Originally posted by ormus
    Where have you been living ormus ? the outer Hebrides ?
    There are loads of companies now that do timber frame buildings, which are either rendered - brick skinned or timber clad.

    Considerably cheaper than brick, quicker to build, more eco friendly amongst the pro's.
    You may click thanks if you found my advice useful
  • ormus
    • #8
    • 9th Jan 12, 5:48 PM
    • #8
    • 9th Jan 12, 5:48 PM
    i was waiting for this one,
    typical modern timber framed in the uk is not the same as an oz (or usa) wooden house.
    Get some gorm.
    • muckybutt
    • By muckybutt 9th Jan 12, 6:21 PM
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    muckybutt
    • #9
    • 9th Jan 12, 6:21 PM
    • #9
    • 9th Jan 12, 6:21 PM
    i was waiting for this one,
    typical modern timber framed in the uk is not the same as an oz (or usa) wooden house.
    Originally posted by ormus

    In what way ?
    You may click thanks if you found my advice useful
  • Leif
    and a timber domestic house is virtually unknown in the uk.
    Originally posted by ormus
    Aren't park homes timber? (The kind that look like mobile homes, on a brick base.)
    • ed110220
    • By ed110220 10th Jan 12, 12:12 PM
    • 1,036 Posts
    • 524 Thanks
    ed110220
    I would certainly ask on an Australian forum rather than here because the relative merits of different types of house construction are to a great extent based on what is expected in the country the house is in, rather than being absolute.

    For example, in the UK most people (and that goes for mortgage providers, insurers etc) expect a house to be built out of brick, stone or concrete block and tend to be at least a little suspicious of anything else. What is common and perfectly normal in Australia may be viewed with suspicion here. Conversely, what is recommended in the UK will probably not be what people are looking for in Australia.

    As for warmth or heating, I expect that it is probably similar to South Africa in that people don't really bother with insulation or heating systems and simply accept that in deepest July it will be a bit chilly sometimes, put on a jumper etc and maybe a small electric or bottled gas fire.
    • Hintza
    • By Hintza 10th Jan 12, 2:02 PM
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    • 13,531 Thanks
    Hintza
    i was waiting for this one,
    typical modern timber framed in the uk is not the same as an oz (or usa) wooden house.
    Originally posted by ormus
    Forestry commision used to build them in Scotland in the 60's and a few council houses were also built (probably same company as the FC ones). (I perhaps have made this up) but I always thought they were virtually unmortgageable in the UK.
    Dis tyd om op te staan!
    • DUKE
    • By DUKE 10th Jan 12, 4:33 PM
    • 6,813 Posts
    • 258,696 Thanks
    DUKE
    Where have you been living ormus ? the outer Hebrides ?
    There are loads of companies now that do timber frame buildings, which are either rendered - brick skinned or timber clad.

    Considerably cheaper than brick, quicker to build, more eco friendly amongst the pro's.
    Originally posted by muckybutt
    I'm in a wooden house in the UK & I wouldn't be anywhere else.
    Thanks everyone!
    • jc808
    • By jc808 10th Jan 12, 6:17 PM
    • 1,700 Posts
    • 1,450 Thanks
    jc808
    I'm in a wooden house in the UK & I wooden't be anywhere else.
    Originally posted by DUKE
    Fixed for spelling
  • shegar
    Where have you been living ormus ? the outer Hebrides ?
    There are loads of companies now that do timber frame buildings, which are either rendered - brick skinned or timber clad.

    Considerably cheaper than brick, quicker to build, more eco friendly amongst the pro's.
    Originally posted by muckybutt
    Yep we are in a scandinavian timber framed bungalow with brick skinned, built in 1961, and it hold the heat exceptionally well,theres loads of homes built timber framed, alot more than anyone realise..............
  • AdmiralX
    We were originally set on buying a brick home, however there are lots of weatherboard and cedar wood houses in the area for sale which are also considerably cheaper. Pros cons? Any advice/experience would be greatly appreciated!
    Originally posted by katycloud
    The wooden homes look lovely and you can paint them beautifully... but just one question: Did you check the insurance?
    "I'll be back."
    • Owain Moneysaver
    • By Owain Moneysaver 11th Jan 12, 1:44 AM
    • 6,862 Posts
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    Owain Moneysaver
    Where have you been living ormus ? the outer Hebrides ?
    Originally posted by muckybutt
    Timber houses probably more common in the outer Hebrides - too expensive to get bricks over on the ferries.

    In fact, according to UK Timber Frame Association, Timber frame is the most popular form of house construction in Scotland, and UK-wide 22.2% market share of Timber Frame in New Housing.
    Wins and Freebies: τøøτhραṡτε, τεα-τøώεl
    • rustyboy21
    • By rustyboy21 11th Jan 12, 3:06 AM
    • 2,506 Posts
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    rustyboy21
    There is a bit of a difference in a UK timber property and an Australian one.

    We have more consistent weather, with not a massive variable temperature and humidity levels. Australia is more marked.

    My sister lives just outside Sydney, she has the Air con on full blast in their summer and a log stove blazing in the winter. She lives just away from one of the Forests and the humidity is shocking.

    I wouldn't seek advice on here, get more knowledgeable people, who know what they are talking about, to give advice. Even try a site like poms on a plane, who seem to be ex pats living in Oz.
    • Hintza
    • By Hintza 11th Jan 12, 7:37 AM
    • 18,846 Posts
    • 13,531 Thanks
    Hintza
    In Scotland I would have thought over 90% were and have been timber frame for years with brick, block, stone cladding.
    Dis tyd om op te staan!
  • fatbikersbouncebetter
    46% OF new housing stock built to 2009 was of timber frame construction in the UK (Ormus). Insulation and pest/mould restrictions are built in and overall insulation is above the standards set by NHBA and Euro legislation. I do not know about Oz, but why would they be made with less insulation????
    In the uSA (and yes I have travelled extensively there) the majority of homes that were built in the last 100 yrs were timber framed and clad. (Though cladding is now either PVCu or alloy).

    1) Do they offer a warranty for timber framed 2) Check the insulation values, someone must have them. 3) As mentioned above, just how long will you be there. Even a wood house must have an expected lifspan.
    Good luck .
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