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  • FIRST POST
    • AlexLK
    • By AlexLK 8th Mar 15, 11:07 PM
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    AlexLK
    Renovations and Repayments.
    • #1
    • 8th Mar 15, 11:07 PM
    Renovations and Repayments. 8th Mar 15 at 11:07 PM
    Hello and welcome to visitors familiar with my journey thus far and are surprised to see me on such a sensible board and a further warm welcome to the new faces wondering what they've let themselves in for.

    Let me begin by clarifying a few points: the first one is I am not sure whether I'm actually serious or not about clearing my mortgage and the second is the fact my house needs quite a bit of work doing to it. This work I do myself and in the time my wife and I have lived in the house we've learnt all kinds of new skills. The current project involves renewing the windows and I am making the frames myself, two are done and I'm pleased to say look great.

    I plan to use this mortgage free (how very grown up) diary to document the renovations and my savings activities, out of which overpayments may or may not be made. However, I am fully committed to long term saving and making as much money as possible. A long term goal of mine is to add to the BTL portfolio I shall one day inherit and am already becoming more involved in which is perhaps a good reason to pay my mortgage off and make my current property into an investment.

    Aside from the recent interest in moneysaving I have a four year old son, run my own company, play and teach the violin and piano whilst studying for my own interest. Oh and don't mention the cars.

    Those familiar with my debt-free diary will know I'm not exactly great at record keeping but am trying to improve, so please don't expect the detailed financial updates others seem to put on here. To kick things off, I suppose I ought to confess the mortgage debt is a total of circa £185,000 and I have no real timescale or plan in mind to pay it off.

    Sorry if this is not a particularly articulate introduction, as I seem to be at a loss how to tailor it to both those who've read my debt free diary and to new readers frequenting mortgage free.
    Saved £11,000 in 2015, £9,800 in 2016.
    From a £32,000 debt on 2/9/2013 to debt free on 12/1/2015.
Page 166
    • AlexLK
    • By AlexLK 2nd Oct 17, 11:12 PM
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    AlexLK
    Personally I don't see the point in clearing the mortgage at the expense of living comfortably in your own home. I'm not suggesting people spend all their money on redoing things that don't need replacing, but planned projects in my opinion should be given priority. What are you planning on doing next? And what timescale, bearing in mind how busy you are?

    Re the teaching, I think there is a lot to be said for carrying on at least until you move schools as I've no doubt you would find the experience very different. If you give up now I think it could be detrimental to you in the longer term (the old 'can't achieve anything' view of the world) so please take that into account when deciding.

    As to turning up on your first day wearing your old school tie - what exactly were you trying to achieve? That's the type of thing the old 'superior' Alex would have done - or was it a type of 'comfort blanket' thing? (In which case your lucky pants would have been better ).
    Originally posted by gallygirl
    Hi Gally,

    We are planning to renovate the kitchen and other rooms. The other rooms shouldn't take too much effort but the kitchen will. I don't have a timescale at the moment as we are OK for the moment. Would be nice to have the money there, ready to go when we decide.

    I don't really know what to do re. teaching at the moment. I've spent the last few weeks counting down to half term and nothing about it is inspiring me. That's not how I wish to live. There is a part of me saying finish the qualification and try it for a year but another part saying leave without having to pay for the course (£9,250) but use the knowledge I've gained (mainly about myself) to make a better go of the business.

    I wasn't trying to be "superior" to anybody. I thought it would be a nice thing to do. Clearly not.

    Delighted to hear that you and MrsK are getting on so well Alex. Heartily approve of spending some money on the house. The new bathroom has given a lot of pleasure and comfort. What's next?

    Both very good points gallygirl.

    I'm sure you can see that there is a whole lot more in 'old school tie' than simply encouraging the pupils to have pride in their school. It signifies (especially to colleagues) the big divide between your respective likely backgrounds and circumstances. It's why so many people find it hard to listen to lessons in austerity from the likes of Dave, George (aka Gideon) and Boris. You are in a privileged position that you can afford not to be a teacher (or anything else) if you don't want to. You have the back up of the family business and MrsK's salary. Very few teachers are in that position.

    I think it highly unlikely that you could be a teacher and only work 40 hours a week. It has the advantage of flexibility that you could work just about 33 in term time on the school premises but there will still be a lot of PPA out of contact hours.

    Unless you are going to do a complete about turn from your thinking in recent months then I'm sure you'll not like yourself if you give up the course now. If the development project involves funding from your parents or even MrsK that could become fraught if they decided to pull the strings attached at any point.

    Completing the course and getting QTS would give you options. You could decide to do part time work after that which would fit in with any projects.

    You're bright, skilled and resourceful so you'd always find a way of earning a living of sorts but you've been dissatisfied with the lack of financial independence from your wife and family before. It would a shame to see it happen again.
    Originally posted by maman
    Thank you, maman. See above re. house.

    I wasn't trying to cause any sort of friction between myself and the staff at the school. Clearly they had other ideas and didn't wish to get to know me.

    You're right about not being able to do everything needed in 40 hours. At the moment, I have no other time. I didn't think I'd be the one saying this as I believe I did my research and volunteered. However, I wasn't prepared for the environment I've entered into and am not sure I want to gain QTS and work in the school environment. I'm struggling to even get along with pupils.

    Also, i’m Sorry to pile on here Alex but in the run up to starting your course you were talking about that a lot, and I don’t remember any mention of new property projects or a new found enthusiasm for the family business. Is it at all possible that the disappointment you are feeling about your course is leading to you jumping on to this distraction that is more in your comfort zone and convincing yourself it could be ‘the answer’?
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    I don't know, Red Squirrel. However, I don't think it's a bad thing even if I am. Without meaning to be vulgar about it, I could work 25 hours per week and easily clear more than twice a teaching salary just making an effort with the property business. I suppose my attitude of not caring about the money leading up to the course has been thwarted by the realisation of potentially being paid c.£23,000 before tax to work 50+ hours with slow progression to about £32,000 p/a before tax. I hadn't expected this but it seems an insult for the amount of work put in, then that isn't good enough so far as the profession / employer is concerned. I'm sure I'd feel differently if I were enjoying the work but I'm not.
    Last edited by AlexLK; 02-10-2017 at 11:15 PM.
    Saved £11,000 in 2015, £9,800 in 2016.
    From a £32,000 debt on 2/9/2013 to debt free on 12/1/2015.
    • AlexLK
    • By AlexLK 2nd Oct 17, 11:14 PM
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    AlexLK
    Just popping in to say "Chin up" Alex. Teacher training was a very hard year even as a 20/21 year old.
    Originally posted by smallholdingsister
    Thank you, smallholding.

    I'm really struggling with it, I'm afraid.

    Seconded re mortgage. It's great to pay it off early and will save you a bucket load of money but there is (presumably) a plan to pay it off at the right time ie an endowment policy or the repayment method so get the house comfortable before going into over payments too much - no point the house being all your own but it's a broke down wreck of a place rather than a comfortable home lol

    Daisy xx
    Originally posted by daisy 1571
    The house has been a broke down wreck of a place many year before we even laid eyes on it.
    Saved £11,000 in 2015, £9,800 in 2016.
    From a £32,000 debt on 2/9/2013 to debt free on 12/1/2015.
    • AlexLK
    • By AlexLK 2nd Oct 17, 11:31 PM
    • 5,797 Posts
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    AlexLK
    October targets / financials are as follows:
    Director's salary into savings.
    Food budget: £400.
    Alcohol free days (agreed with Mrs. K.): 21.
    Eating out: 4.
    Meat free: 10.
    NSDs: 10.
    Buy son's main birthday present.
    Review utility suppliers (contracts expiring soon).
    Get a new 'phone (Mrs. K.), no doubt this is going to be an iPhone 8, so getting the best deal there is. To be fair to her she's not upgraded her 'phone in a long time, for the past few years she's had a SIM only contract.
    Car spends: £100.
    Originally posted by AlexLK
    So much for the food target. My mother went shopping for us and we come home to a bill for £120.
    Saved £11,000 in 2015, £9,800 in 2016.
    From a £32,000 debt on 2/9/2013 to debt free on 12/1/2015.
    • daisy 1571
    • By daisy 1571 3rd Oct 17, 8:11 AM
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    • 1,635 Thanks
    daisy 1571
    Hi Gally,

    We are planning to renovate the kitchen and other rooms. The other rooms shouldn't take too much effort but the kitchen will. I don't have a timescale at the moment as we are OK for the moment. Would be nice to have the money there, ready to go when we decide.

    I don't really know what to do re. teaching at the moment. I've spent the last few weeks counting down to half term and nothing about it is inspiring me. That's not how I wish to live. There is a part of me saying finish the qualification and try it for a year but another part saying leave without having to pay for the course (£9,250) but use the knowledge I've gained (mainly about myself) to make a better go of the business.

    I wasn't trying to be "superior" to anybody. I thought it would be a nice thing to do. Clearly not.



    Thank you, maman. See above re. house.

    I wasn't trying to cause any sort of friction between myself and the staff at the school. Clearly they had other ideas and didn't wish to get to know me.

    You're right about not being able to do everything needed in 40 hours. At the moment, I have no other time. I didn't think I'd be the one saying this as I believe I did my research and volunteered. However, I wasn't prepared for the environment I've entered into and am not sure I want to gain QTS and work in the school environment. I'm struggling to even get along with pupils.



    I don't know, Red Squirrel. However, I don't think it's a bad thing even if I am. Without meaning to be vulgar about it, I could work 25 hours per week and easily clear more than twice a teaching salary just making an effort with the property business. I suppose my attitude of not caring about the money leading up to the course has been thwarted by the realisation of potentially being paid c.£23,000 before tax to work 50+ hours with slow progression to about £32,000 p/a before tax. I hadn't expected this but it seems an insult for the amount of work put in, then that isn't good enough so far as the profession / employer is concerned. I'm sure I'd feel differently if I were enjoying the work but I'm not.
    Originally posted by AlexLK
    I think that's been the slightly frustrating thing about your attitude to the business - its a job a lot of people would love to have and you could have made a real go of it yet you seemed to persist in faffing about, not putting effort into and consequently feeling you shouldn't take a proper wage. You were so lucky having this job, a job your can do and could be good at yet seemed to not want to take seriously. At least now you can see that and hopefully will appreciate the opportunities it can give you and you can just get on with the house and make it nice for you all. At some point you might look back and wonder why on earth it took you so long and why you were 'happy' (cos we know by reading your diary you weren't happy at all with the house) to live in it in the state it was in. ��
    Last edited by daisy 1571; 03-10-2017 at 9:17 AM.
    "Never save something for a special occasion. Every day in your life is a special occasion" Take hold of every moment by anon

    The difference between what you were yesterday and what you will be tomorrow is what you do today
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 3rd Oct 17, 12:11 PM
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    Red-Squirrel
    use the knowledge I've gained (mainly about myself) to make a better go of the business.
    Originally posted by AlexLK
    Don't feel you have to answer if you don't want to, but what do you feel this month in a school has taught you about yourself?
    • maman
    • By maman 3rd Oct 17, 12:11 PM
    • 16,870 Posts
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    maman
    Without meaning to be vulgar about it, I could work 25 hours per week and easily clear more than twice a teaching salary just making an effort with the property business. I suppose my attitude of not caring about the money leading up to the course has been thwarted by the realisation of potentially being paid c.£23,000 before tax to work 50+ hours with slow progression to about £32,000 p/a before tax. I hadn't expected this but it seems an insult for the amount of work put in, then that isn't good enough so far as the profession / employer is concerned. I'm sure I'd feel differently if I were enjoying the work but I'm not.
    Originally posted by AlexLK

    I agree it's a disgrace that teachers (along with the vast majority of people in the public sector) are not more highly valued. I think, for years, teachers have mostly put up with it because they've enjoyed the work, had the mindset that it was important to make a difference, liked the children etc. It's no coincidence that as working conditions have deteriorated, salary has fallen in relative terms and government ministers like Mr Gove have denigrated teachers that protest by calling them 'The Blob' then they are voting with their feet.

    So much for the food target. My mother went shopping for us and we come home to a bill for £120.
    Originally posted by AlexLK

    I hate to say 'We told you so' but we did. It's kind of your mother to offer support with the shopping as you're busy in the day but it really isn't necessary. With a meal plan and shopping list you or MrsK could be in and out of a supermarket (preferably Aldi) in half an hour and it would all be sorted for a week. How do you imagine other working parents manage?
    • newgirly
    • By newgirly 11th Oct 17, 6:50 AM
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    newgirly
    Morning Alex, how is at all going?
    MFW 21
    Target for 2017 £38,545 / £14,264 paid so far

    Mortgage £47,330 4 years 8 months left. Total owed £63,993 planning to clear in 24 months
    WW target - 29.5 lb start date 11/5/17 so far 16.5lb lost.
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 18th Oct 17, 1:21 PM
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    Red-Squirrel
    Hope you're doing ok Alex. x
    • AlexLK
    • By AlexLK 19th Oct 17, 11:32 PM
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    AlexLK
    I think that's been the slightly frustrating thing about your attitude to the business - its a job a lot of people would love to have and you could have made a real go of it yet you seemed to persist in faffing about, not putting effort into and consequently feeling you shouldn't take a proper wage. You were so lucky having this job, a job your can do and could be good at yet seemed to not want to take seriously. At least now you can see that and hopefully will appreciate the opportunities it can give you and you can just get on with the house and make it nice for you all. At some point you might look back and wonder why on earth it took you so long and why you were 'happy' (cos we know by reading your diary you weren't happy at all with the house) to live in it in the state it was in. ��
    Originally posted by daisy 1571
    Hi Daisy,

    I don't think I've been happy for any length of time and I've been punishing myself because if I'm honest, I know I don't deserve to be in the position I am. I also cannot really do a lot about my past.

    Don't feel you have to answer if you don't want to, but what do you feel this month in a school has taught you about yourself?
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    Positive: I can cope with full time working hours, manage my time effectively and sleep for a reasonable amount of hours for the majority of nights.

    Negative: I have an ability to wind people up without hardly saying a word (already realised this to an extent but not quite to this extent).

    I agree it's a disgrace that teachers (along with the vast majority of people in the public sector) are not more highly valued. I think, for years, teachers have mostly put up with it because they've enjoyed the work, had the mindset that it was important to make a difference, liked the children etc. It's no coincidence that as working conditions have deteriorated, salary has fallen in relative terms and government ministers like Mr Gove have denigrated teachers that protest by calling them 'The Blob' then they are voting with their feet.

    I hate to say 'We told you so' but we did. It's kind of your mother to offer support with the shopping as you're busy in the day but it really isn't necessary. With a meal plan and shopping list you or MrsK could be in and out of a supermarket (preferably Aldi) in half an hour and it would all be sorted for a week. How do you imagine other working parents manage?
    Originally posted by maman
    Unfortunately, the putting up with unreasonable terms seems to be part of the culture which I cannot say I understand.

    At the moment getting my mother doing things and keeping herself occupied is important as my father isn't well. I understand other working parents manage and I know the supermarkets are an option, even though it is not an option we particularly want to take.
    Saved £11,000 in 2015, £9,800 in 2016.
    From a £32,000 debt on 2/9/2013 to debt free on 12/1/2015.
    • AlexLK
    • By AlexLK 19th Oct 17, 11:34 PM
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    AlexLK
    Morning Alex, how is at all going?
    Originally posted by newgirly
    I'm not really sure, NG.

    Hope you're doing ok Alex. x
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    Thank you, Red Squirrel.
    Saved £11,000 in 2015, £9,800 in 2016.
    From a £32,000 debt on 2/9/2013 to debt free on 12/1/2015.
    • maman
    • By maman 19th Oct 17, 11:44 PM
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    maman
    Thanks for posting Alex .

    Hope it's half term for you. You shouldn't be up this late on a school night!
    • Suffolk lass
    • By Suffolk lass 20th Oct 17, 6:39 AM
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    Suffolk lass
    Thanks for posting Alex .

    Hope it's half term for you. You shouldn't be up this late on a school night!
    Originally posted by maman
    Just like to echo that (says the mad woman who has been up for two hours on a non-working day at 06.30 )
    MFiT T4 #2 update 31.2% after Q6
    Save £12k in 2017 #64 - £8833.96 saved (80.31%) after September - my annual target is £11,000
    OS Grocery Challenge 2017 budget of £3,600 £3000 (reduced from Apr) - 70.68/75% including stores after July
    My DFD is http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5593594
    • AlexLK
    • By AlexLK 20th Oct 17, 11:14 AM
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    AlexLK
    I have today and the coming week off but am not sure whether I will be going back. I’m not doing very well in observations or tasks set. At the moment I’ve no intention to apply for a teaching job and have potential work in property lined up with an old school friend. If nothing else it has given me the confidence to know I can do full time work without it bringing undue stress and to make the most of the connections and knowledge I do have. Upon reflection, teaching has also made me realise it wasn’t the work which was a problem but the culture of an organisation (and profession) which contributed to making me ill.

    On a different note, we are keeping good records of our finances and I’m starting to get some real advice about my business / family finances for the future rather than just playing at it. I suppose it’s really starting to sink in that my parents aren’t going to be here forever and there’s a potential for some of their last years to render them not really the people they were.
    Last edited by AlexLK; Yesterday at 11:23 AM.
    Saved £11,000 in 2015, £9,800 in 2016.
    From a £32,000 debt on 2/9/2013 to debt free on 12/1/2015.
    • kelpie35
    • By kelpie35 20th Oct 17, 2:58 PM
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    kelpie35
    So pleased to see you back Alex.

    Sorry to hear that the teaching has not gone too well for you.

    I do understand what you mean by the "culture and profession"

    You know your own mind now and the things that work best for you.

    Enjoy your time off and take care of yourself and your family.
    • slowlyfading
    • By slowlyfading 20th Oct 17, 9:33 PM
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    slowlyfading
    I think if you feel like that, then you probably shouldn't continue.

    As someone who works in secondary teaching, you have to love the job you do. Yes, the days are long, difficult, frustrating, demanding and a host of other things, but something in there has to make you want to be there.

    It's the little things, like a Year 7 thanking you for your lesson, to a grumpy Year 9 boy suddenly getting something he didn't understand before. It's your GCSE class having a laugh on an afternoon over something really daft. It's the things children come out with that they don't realise are funny but are actually hilarious. It's about making connections, helping them through the tricky stages and enjoying the fact that you work with wonderful young people.

    If you don't feel that, then teaching isn't for you. And I'm saying that in the kindest way possible.
    Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind - Dr Seuss
    Personal Finance Blogger / Oct NSD - 10 / Ultimate Dream Fund - £19,661.40/£306,000
    Engaged 14/08/10 // Married 31/03/12 // DS born August 15 // Baby #2 Due Dec 17
    • AlexLK
    • By AlexLK 20th Oct 17, 11:59 PM
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    AlexLK
    So pleased to see you back Alex.

    Sorry to hear that the teaching has not gone too well for you.

    I do understand what you mean by the "culture and profession"

    You know your own mind now and the things that work best for you.

    Enjoy your time off and take care of yourself and your family.
    Originally posted by kelpie35
    Thank you, kelpie.

    Nothing to be sorry about. Whilst I've not been having the best time, I have gained some knowledge and insight. I've been able to step back and think things through rationally rather than overwhelming myself with stress. I know if I choose not to go back it doesn't make me a failure, rather I tried something I wanted to try and it wasn't meant to be. I don't really know what's happened but it's like I've flicked a switch in my mind.

    Going to try to enjoy the coming week as much as possible and get out to a few places with my son. However, my father was meant to come out of hospital today and he hasn't, so the coming week is looking mostly like entertaining my mother and helping father.

    I think if you feel like that, then you probably shouldn't continue.

    As someone who works in secondary teaching, you have to love the job you do. Yes, the days are long, difficult, frustrating, demanding and a host of other things, but something in there has to make you want to be there.

    It's the little things, like a Year 7 thanking you for your lesson, to a grumpy Year 9 boy suddenly getting something he didn't understand before. It's your GCSE class having a laugh on an afternoon over something really daft. It's the things children come out with that they don't realise are funny but are actually hilarious. It's about making connections, helping them through the tricky stages and enjoying the fact that you work with wonderful young people.

    If you don't feel that, then teaching isn't for you. And I'm saying that in the kindest way possible.
    Originally posted by slowlyfading
    That's the conclusion I'm arriving at, SF.

    In my volunteering work / music teaching I've felt it and also really love being a parent. However, I'm not passionate about the things I am teaching and have formed no sort of bond with any of the pupils. I still teach a few pupils Music and go above and beyond for them as they are dedicated, passionate and open to learning. Some I've let go in the past because they are not. In a classroom situation I don't have that control to teach the pupils I wish to teach. My main problem lies with staff and the culture, though. It almost seems unreasonable to have other commitments. I didn't attend one staff meeting (they didn't care about my opinion but apparently did about my presence) because I needed to meet with a tenant resulted in a meeting with the Head that week. The day after, a particular member of staff with a taste for trouble decided to try to alienate me from everyone else. I spoke to the school direct person to be told I need to attend staff meetings regardless and that I am not making it easy for staff to like me. In the time I've been there, I've done everything asked of me other than the one staff meeting and offered to help with all music related things but that isn't good enough because apparently having property to deal with = not making it easy for staff to like you.
    Saved £11,000 in 2015, £9,800 in 2016.
    From a £32,000 debt on 2/9/2013 to debt free on 12/1/2015.
    • smallholdingsister
    • By smallholdingsister 21st Oct 17, 5:34 AM
    • 3,403 Posts
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    smallholdingsister
    I think if you feel like that, then you probably shouldn't continue.

    As someone who works in secondary teaching, you have to love the job you do. Yes, the days are long, difficult, frustrating, demanding and a host of other things, but something in there has to make you want to be there.

    It's the little things, like a Year 7 thanking you for your lesson, to a grumpy Year 9 boy suddenly getting something he didn't understand before. It's your GCSE class having a laugh on an afternoon over something really daft. It's the things children come out with that they don't realise are funny but are actually hilarious. It's about making connections, helping them through the tricky stages and enjoying the fact that you work with wonderful young people.

    If you don't feel that, then teaching isn't for you. And I'm saying that in the kindest way possible.
    Originally posted by slowlyfading
    Epic post. Yesterday it was hysterics over hairy carrots.
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 21st Oct 17, 9:52 AM
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    Red-Squirrel

    In my volunteering work / music teaching I've felt it and also really love being a parent. However, I'm not passionate about the things I am teaching and have formed no sort of bond with any of the pupils. I still teach a few pupils Music and go above and beyond for them as they are dedicated, passionate and open to learning. Some I've let go in the past because they are not. In a classroom situation I don't have that control to teach the pupils I wish to teach. My main problem lies with staff and the culture, though. It almost seems unreasonable to have other commitments. I didn't attend one staff meeting (they didn't care about my opinion but apparently did about my presence) because I needed to meet with a tenant resulted in a meeting with the Head that week. The day after, a particular member of staff with a taste for trouble decided to try to alienate me from everyone else. I spoke to the school direct person to be told I need to attend staff meetings regardless and that I am not making it easy for staff to like me. In the time I've been there, I've done everything asked of me other than the one staff meeting and offered to help with all music related things but that isn't good enough because apparently having property to deal with = not making it easy for staff to like you.
    Originally posted by AlexLK
    Did you speak to anybody about the fact that you couldn't attend the staff meeting beforehand? Did you try to rearrange the meeting with the tenant or was it urgent?

    I hope you didn't just not turn up and when asked about it dismiss it with 'I have properties to deal with'. Do you realise how that can come across? For one thing, a staff meeting isn't just a chance for you to give your opinion, its a chance to hear other people and to get new information that affects you, your pupils and the school, you've now let them know that doesn't matter to you.

    If you did pre-arrange with someone more senior or with your mentor/supervisor that you couldn't attend and it was agreed that it was ok for you to skip one, that's different.

    It does sound like working in a school is not going to be for you though, and that's fine, it is what it is and you are who you are! If teachers only taught children who wanted to learn and were enthusiastic about school though, how many children with the potential to grow into hard working, decent, productive adults would get left behind? If you don't want to be the one to try and help them, that's fine, its not something everybody can do, but please have a little respect for those that dedicate their working lives to it.

    Maybe you could look at a way to formalise your music tuition and turn that into more of a small business? It sounds like it suits you much better.
    Last edited by Red-Squirrel; Today at 10:01 AM.
    • smallholdingsister
    • By smallholdingsister 21st Oct 17, 10:59 AM
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    smallholdingsister
    However you view staff meetings they should be a priority.

    In my experience the most negative way in which other teachers will view you is with indifference. We are simply too busy to get mixed up in other peoples' stuff.
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  • RT @LordsEconCom: On Tuesday Martin Lewis, Hannah Morrish & Shakira Martin gave evidence to the Cttee. Read the full transcript here: https?

  • Ta ta for now. Half term's starting, so I'm exchanging my MoneySavingExpert hat for one that says Daddy in big letters. See you in a week.

  • RT @thismorning: Can @MartinSLewis' deals save YOU cash? ???? https://t.co/igbHCwzeiN

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