Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • tikki999
    • By tikki999 13th Jan 18, 1:27 PM
    • 35Posts
    • 27Thanks
    tikki999
    On less pay than colleagues doing exact same job
    • #1
    • 13th Jan 18, 1:27 PM
    On less pay than colleagues doing exact same job 13th Jan 18 at 1:27 PM
    When offered a job last year, I was told that I would start at the bottom end of the pay scale as I did not have enough experience and they would be employing people with more experience who could help me out at the start.

    Very quickly, it was apparent that nobody had previous experience of this position (call centre) but we all had professional experience in the area of work the call centre deals in. In fact, my qualifications are higher than those of several of my colleagues doing the EXACT same job. Over time, I realise, through casual conversation and information that was offered to me by several colleagues, that several colleagues are being paid at the higher end of the scale.

    I quickly began to feel that I had been duped, in terms of the rationale for starting me at the lowest end of the salary scale and, discovering that my colleagues are earning more than me for doing the same job, I am angry and deeply resentful of the company. This information does not impact how I feel about my colleagues - we are a great team, I respect them all and they deserve their salary (as would I!)

    My probationary period is soon to end and at the last review I told my manager about my feelings around this and what steps I could take to address this. I have not spoken to colleagues, and will not do so. My manager told me that I either wait until pay rises are negotiated in a few months time OR I would have to take it 'to the top' now.

    I've just been digging around for information, and as I understand it, it is illegal to pay employees different salaries for doing the same job. Any thoughts?

    In the meantime, I am looking for alternative work, there's just not a lot around in my field.
Page 1
    • zx81
    • By zx81 13th Jan 18, 1:35 PM
    • 14,813 Posts
    • 15,651 Thanks
    zx81
    • #2
    • 13th Jan 18, 1:35 PM
    • #2
    • 13th Jan 18, 1:35 PM

    I've just been digging around for information, and as I understand it, it is illegal to pay employees different salaries for doing the same job. Any thoughts?
    Originally posted by tikki999
    It's not. .
    • Mulder00
    • By Mulder00 13th Jan 18, 1:53 PM
    • 465 Posts
    • 424 Thanks
    Mulder00
    • #3
    • 13th Jan 18, 1:53 PM
    • #3
    • 13th Jan 18, 1:53 PM
    There's no law saying people doing the same job have to be paid the same.

    Forget about what others are earning and ask yourself if you would have been content with your salary without knowing what they earn. It feels much better achieving something due to own merit and hard work, rather than being simply because someone else earns more.

    Stop being jealous and focus on your own life and circumstances.
    • ssparks2003
    • By ssparks2003 13th Jan 18, 2:04 PM
    • 249 Posts
    • 325 Thanks
    ssparks2003
    • #4
    • 13th Jan 18, 2:04 PM
    • #4
    • 13th Jan 18, 2:04 PM
    As others have said you have not right to the same pay, you ever need to negotiate more pay, accept the level of pay that you were will accept for the role originally, resign and get a job elsewhere for more money. These are your rights.
    • xapprenticex
    • By xapprenticex 13th Jan 18, 2:06 PM
    • 1,358 Posts
    • 1,301 Thanks
    xapprenticex
    • #5
    • 13th Jan 18, 2:06 PM
    • #5
    • 13th Jan 18, 2:06 PM
    This is why staff should not be talking about salary at work.
    • crackerberry
    • By crackerberry 13th Jan 18, 2:31 PM
    • 734 Posts
    • 1,166 Thanks
    crackerberry
    • #6
    • 13th Jan 18, 2:31 PM
    • #6
    • 13th Jan 18, 2:31 PM
    This is why staff should not be talking about salary at work.
    Originally posted by xapprenticex
    The law says they can, and so they should.
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 13th Jan 18, 2:31 PM
    • 1,727 Posts
    • 1,572 Thanks
    Comms69
    • #7
    • 13th Jan 18, 2:31 PM
    • #7
    • 13th Jan 18, 2:31 PM
    Which law?...
    • crackerberry
    • By crackerberry 13th Jan 18, 2:35 PM
    • 734 Posts
    • 1,166 Thanks
    crackerberry
    • #8
    • 13th Jan 18, 2:35 PM
    • #8
    • 13th Jan 18, 2:35 PM
    Equality Act 2010
    c15, part 5, chapter 3, disclosure of information, s77
    • RichardD1970
    • By RichardD1970 13th Jan 18, 2:47 PM
    • 2,732 Posts
    • 3,986 Thanks
    RichardD1970
    • #9
    • 13th Jan 18, 2:47 PM
    • #9
    • 13th Jan 18, 2:47 PM
    Equality Act 2010
    c15, part 5, chapter 3, disclosure of information, s77
    Originally posted by crackerberry
    Isn't that just relevant to having a protected characteristic?

    Pretty sure I have heard of people who have it written into their contracts that they aren't allowed to discuss pay with colleagues.
    • theoretica
    • By theoretica 13th Jan 18, 2:57 PM
    • 4,988 Posts
    • 6,243 Thanks
    theoretica
    This is why staff should not be talking about salary at work.
    Originally posted by xapprenticex
    Or exactly why they should, so employers cut down on this sort of variation unless they can openly justify it, because they don't want disgruntled staff.
    But a banker, engaged at enormous expense,
    Had the whole of their cash in his care.
    Lewis Carroll
    • crackerberry
    • By crackerberry 13th Jan 18, 3:01 PM
    • 734 Posts
    • 1,166 Thanks
    crackerberry
    Isn't that just relevant to having a protected characteristic?

    Pretty sure I have heard of people who have it written into their contracts that they aren't allowed to discuss pay with colleagues.
    Originally posted by RichardD1970
    I've had it written into my contract in the past too.

    As long as an employee/employees are discussing pay because one or more suspects or is concerned about "unfair pay" then they are within their legal rights to discuss it and cannot be discriplined or told otherwise for doing so.

    https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2010/15/section/77

    77 Discussions about pay

    (1)A term of a person's work that purports to prevent or restrict the person (P) from disclosing or seeking to disclose information about the terms of P's work is unenforceable against P in so far as P makes or seeks to make a relevant pay disclosure.

    (2)A term of a person's work that purports to prevent or restrict the person (P) from seeking disclosure of information from a colleague about the terms of the colleague's work is unenforceable against P in so far as P seeks a relevant pay disclosure from the colleague; and “colleague” includes a former colleague in relation to the work in question.

    (3)A disclosure is a relevant pay disclosure if made for the purpose of enabling the person who makes it, or the person to whom it is made, to find out whether or to what extent there is, in relation to the work in question, a connection between pay and having (or not having) a particular protected characteristic.

    (4)The following are to be treated as protected acts for the purposes of the relevant victimisation provision—

    (a)seeking a disclosure that would be a relevant pay disclosure;

    (b)making or seeking to make a relevant pay disclosure;

    (c)receiving information disclosed in a relevant pay disclosure.

    (5)The relevant victimisation provision is, in relation to a description of work specified in the first column of the table, section 27 so far as it applies for the purposes of a provision mentioned in the second column.
    • Diamandis
    • By Diamandis 13th Jan 18, 4:11 PM
    • 129 Posts
    • 222 Thanks
    Diamandis
    I have hired people on different salaries., usually based on their experience and how they perform during the interview process. If I really want someone to work with us I'll offer a higher salary in order to get them on board.
    • keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    • By keepcalmandstayoutofdebt 13th Jan 18, 5:21 PM
    • 2,991 Posts
    • 1,550 Thanks
    keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    When offered a job last year, I was told that I would start at the bottom end of the pay scale as I did not have enough experience and they would be employing people with more experience who could help me out at the start.

    Very quickly, it was apparent that nobody had previous experience of this position (call centre) but we all had professional experience in the area of work the call centre deals in. In fact, my qualifications are higher than those of several of my colleagues doing the EXACT same job. Over time, I realise, through casual conversation and information that was offered to me by several colleagues, that several colleagues are being paid at the higher end of the scale.
    Originally posted by tikki999
    Could they be embellishing the truth? Without realising their actions. I recall one contact centre I sat in had co-workers on different rates because some were 'agency'. Different shift patterns agreed to etc, perhaps the 'other benefits' list has been reduced for them etc.

    I'm sorry but you meet all sorts in a call centre - through some weird sheer perception of embarrassment some people think they should say they earn higher then they do, in the same way some people think call centre = lowly paid! which isn't always the case.

    Wait for the day when you are the only one in your team! It's not worth letting resentment into an otherwise good situation.
    "If you are caught in a rainstorm, once you accept that you'll receive a soaking, the only thing left to do is enjoy the walk"
    • tikki999
    • By tikki999 13th Jan 18, 5:44 PM
    • 35 Posts
    • 27 Thanks
    tikki999
    Fair enough re. law.

    I am not jealous of colleagues' salary. They deserve it.

    I was not content with the salary when I accepted the job. My discontent has nothing to do with colleague's disclosures.

    Totally understand it may be one of those 'let it go' situations.

    Company disingenuous I believe - stating that ALL new starters begin at low end of pay scale. Blatantly not true.

    We weren't discussing salary. It's those things people say in passing...example:

    Colleague: 'can't believe I'm only getting paid .... an hour to do this job'

    I then realise that I am paid less an hour for doing the same job.

    Colleague: 'Only doing this because I'm starting at top end of salary scale'

    I know I am at the bottom of the scale.

    I take responsibility for not pushing for higher salary. That's what happens when you are desperate for a job, any job. In this case one where I thought 'there must be something I am really missing for them to say I am so lacking in experience' As it is the experience we ALL lacked was working in a call centre and all that implies. The experience we all have is in the area of knowledge/skills required to work with the client/customer at the end of the line.

    Is there any point pursuing this with HR?
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 13th Jan 18, 6:07 PM
    • 10,164 Posts
    • 8,252 Thanks
    lincroft1710

    Is there any point pursuing this with HR?
    Originally posted by tikki999
    No. HR will be on the side of the employer
    • silverwhistle
    • By silverwhistle 13th Jan 18, 6:46 PM
    • 1,683 Posts
    • 2,212 Thanks
    silverwhistle
    This is why staff should not be talking about salary at work.
    Originally posted by xapprenticex
    Absolute rowlocks. It's only in the employer's interest that employees don't know what the others are getting. Knowledge is power, and in these cases the employers want to keep the employees as weak as possible.

    As in the recent BBC case, it's not so much the lower pay that is the issue but the untruthfulness and lack of honesty of the employer..
    • Energize
    • By Energize 14th Jan 18, 2:13 AM
    • 401 Posts
    • 151 Thanks
    Energize
    Absolute rowlocks. It's only in the employer's interest that employees don't know what the others are getting. Knowledge is power, and in these cases the employers want to keep the employees as weak as possible.

    As in the recent BBC case, it's not so much the lower pay that is the issue but the untruthfulness and lack of honesty of the employer..
    Originally posted by silverwhistle
    I couldn't agree more, the more informed an employee is the better the position they are in to make pertinent decisions.
    • Mulder00
    • By Mulder00 14th Jan 18, 7:51 AM
    • 465 Posts
    • 424 Thanks
    Mulder00
    My further thoughts on the discussion:

    When the colleague mentioned their pay in that way, are you sure that they didn't miscalculate their hourly wage or just exaggerate it and you missed their sarcascm?

    In principle I like the idea of published salaries (my company does it for everyone earning above £50k in publishing only job title and earnings, no names) - but not sure if it is always helpful. I like to feel like I'm doing the best I possibly can, not that I am mediocre because two people performed better than me and one worse than me. Published salaries end up making it about everyone, rather than the individual. (And yes, I sit and go through the list very carefully each year!!)
    • Fireflyaway
    • By Fireflyaway 14th Jan 18, 9:51 AM
    • 1,461 Posts
    • 1,508 Thanks
    Fireflyaway
    Its common for people doing the same job to be paid differently, especially the higher up the ladder you get. At the recruitment stage its the ' value' of the candidate that's up for discussion more than than what the compensation for the job should be. A budget would have been set before that. No two people are exactly the same. One candidate might have 4 years experience and another 10 years. One person might have basic qualifications and another some professional certifications. One person might come across a bit shy and not great at expressing themselves and another confident with clear career aspirations. All of those elements might make the pay offered be different. The company might initially need bums on seats but they might he hoping to retain some people to make them team leaders, experts on a particular subject etc so they select certain people and hence pay therm differently.
    In a call centre, I'd be wanting people who are string communicators, able to build rapport and have the ability to remain calm. Maybe some of your colleagues had similar previous experience in retail for example?
    At the end of the day unless you are getting paid less because of a protected characteristic and you can prove so, yes companies do pay different people differently.
    • tikki999
    • By tikki999 14th Jan 18, 10:05 AM
    • 35 Posts
    • 27 Thanks
    tikki999
    My qualifications are 'higher' than most in my team; my experience in the field about equal or more to most, but less than one of them. At the end of the day it doesn't really matter. I don't feel valued by the company; I do feel valued by my colleagues. While the latter supports me to keep on going in to work, the former prompts me to desperately scout around for other work.

    Thanks for your input. I live and learn another day!
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

158Posts Today

1,639Users online

Martin's Twitter