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  • FIRST POST
    • bigfreddiel
    • By bigfreddiel 3rd Sep 16, 9:50 PM
    • 4,225Posts
    • 1,954Thanks
    bigfreddiel
    Retired and still,working - why?
    • #1
    • 3rd Sep 16, 9:50 PM
    Retired and still,working - why? 3rd Sep 16 at 9:50 PM
    After being retired for six months I got bored so went back part time.

    What did you do?

    fj
Page 1
    • westv
    • By westv 3rd Sep 16, 10:00 PM
    • 4,291 Posts
    • 1,864 Thanks
    westv
    • #2
    • 3rd Sep 16, 10:00 PM
    • #2
    • 3rd Sep 16, 10:00 PM
    After being retired for six months I got bored so went back part time.

    What did you do?

    fj
    Originally posted by bigfreddiel
    It'll be a while before I retire but I intend to spend a while (a year maybe??) before I do planning on how I will spend the extra time.
    • tanith
    • By tanith 3rd Sep 16, 10:21 PM
    • 7,982 Posts
    • 8,589 Thanks
    tanith
    • #3
    • 3rd Sep 16, 10:21 PM
    • #3
    • 3rd Sep 16, 10:21 PM
    I've been retired a while , never get bored . I do some volunteering when I feel like it or visit a part of the country I've never been before catching up with family I haven't seen for ages. I'm enjoying just doing whatever I like when I like.
    #6 of the SKI-ers Club

    "All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing" Edmund Burke
    • expansion
    • By expansion 4th Sep 16, 10:34 AM
    • 44 Posts
    • 15 Thanks
    expansion
    • #4
    • 4th Sep 16, 10:34 AM
    • #4
    • 4th Sep 16, 10:34 AM
    Have several friends who have gone back to work part-time as consultants, mostly to reduce spending so much time with partner at home!
    • atush
    • By atush 4th Sep 16, 12:38 PM
    • 16,246 Posts
    • 9,917 Thanks
    atush
    • #5
    • 4th Sep 16, 12:38 PM
    • #5
    • 4th Sep 16, 12:38 PM
    After being retired for six months I got bored so went back part time.

    What did you do?

    fj
    Originally posted by bigfreddiel
    Sounds like you maybe retired a little too early?

    Do you like your part time work? If so, nothing wrong that I can see (except tax maybe- think about putting some of your salary into a pension)
    • robin61
    • By robin61 4th Sep 16, 1:28 PM
    • 554 Posts
    • 436 Thanks
    robin61
    • #6
    • 4th Sep 16, 1:28 PM
    • #6
    • 4th Sep 16, 1:28 PM
    I must admit getting bored is a concern. I read this book a while ago and enjoyed it. Concentrates on what to do with your time rather than how to fund your retirement. A few quid well spent.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/How-Retire-Happy-Wild-Free/dp/096941949X/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1472991929&sr=1-2&keywords=early+retirement
    The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money.
    • ibizafan
    • By ibizafan 4th Sep 16, 2:09 PM
    • 644 Posts
    • 768 Thanks
    ibizafan
    • #7
    • 4th Sep 16, 2:09 PM
    • #7
    • 4th Sep 16, 2:09 PM
    Although I retired from my main job at the age of 60, being in the good position of getting voluntary redundancy, I still do a part time job in a restaurant which I have been doing for 30 years ( in addition to the full time job). This takes up around 16ish hours a week for three evenings, and helps pay for holidays etc and just supplements my council pension. I still enjoy the job, and it keeps me fit as you walk around five miles a night! The rest of my time is taken up with volunteering, gym and just pottering about. I love the combination of the two, and it has provided the opportunity to defer my state pension until I give up the job completely. My OH on the other hand, has no wish to be employed and is happy being completely retired. He finds plenty to do, so different strokes and all that.
    • missbiggles1
    • By missbiggles1 4th Sep 16, 2:19 PM
    • 16,397 Posts
    • 30,257 Thanks
    missbiggles1
    • #8
    • 4th Sep 16, 2:19 PM
    • #8
    • 4th Sep 16, 2:19 PM
    I've retired twice in the past (first at the age of 45 and second at the age of 57) and both times I've done some work afterwards because I needed the money. I hope this is now third time lucky!
    • Silvertabby
    • By Silvertabby 4th Sep 16, 2:34 PM
    • 1,529 Posts
    • 1,819 Thanks
    Silvertabby
    • #9
    • 4th Sep 16, 2:34 PM
    • #9
    • 4th Sep 16, 2:34 PM
    I recently retired at 60, but as I was part time for the last 10 years I suppose it didn't come as so much of a shock to me! Mr S retired 2 years before me and, as he did almost all of the housework when I was still working, he is happy that I have now taken over my share of the duties. We are enjoying the freedoms that retirement brings, and we're certainly not bored! I haven't ruled out some form of voluntary work - perhaps next year when I've got the house and garden the way I want them - but I certainly don't have any intentions of seeking further paid employment.
    Last edited by Silvertabby; 04-09-2016 at 2:36 PM. Reason: add
    • mgdavid
    • By mgdavid 6th Sep 16, 12:26 AM
    • 5,206 Posts
    • 4,374 Thanks
    mgdavid
    Retired 2 year ago - bought a decent new motorhome to replace the old van I use for motor racing; spend a fair amount of time maintaining my two race cars (old MGs); have started building a third.
    Been to a fair few gigs and festivals, listened to a lot of music both online and live.
    Been to Oz for #2 son's wedding followed by holiday. Helped #1 son buy a house, got his garden under control. Drove to Norway with a pal to collect a race car he bought.
    Made time to visit friends and family more often. Expanded my interest in old Japanese watches, bought a couple. Increased the backlog of books I want to read. Expanded my interest in Antarctic exploration, been to a couple of excellent exhibitions. A few trips / holidays in the motorhome.
    Off to France for racing next week, then on down to Spain and Portugal to catch some sun for a couple of weeks.
    And so it goes on; endless To Do list, so little time. All inconsequential to anyone but me, but I love it. I feel privileged and fortunate (or 'blessed' in modern parlance).
    A salary slave no more.....
    • Bootsox
    • By Bootsox 6th Sep 16, 6:02 AM
    • 169 Posts
    • 104 Thanks
    Bootsox
    I must admit getting bored is a concern. I read this book a while ago and enjoyed it. Concentrates on what to do with your time rather than how to fund your retirement. A few quid well spent.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/How-Retire-Happy-Wild-Free/dp/096941949X/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1472991929&sr=1-2&keywords=early+retirement
    Originally posted by robin61
    Is the book not written for the American Market?

    Got a panning off one reviewer:

    This was purchased to help give insight into just what the realities are of retiring early. In the write-up for the book it promised to shed light on just how much money you need for retirement and this was never even mentioned. The book is clearly intended for the US market and has no bearing on UK audiences. It's repetitive, vacuous and a waste of money. I wouldn't even say it was particularly amusing. I'd return it except I have read it and that wouldn't be ethical. It'll go on Ebay in the next few days- don't waste your money on this book (save it for retirement instead)!
    • wary
    • By wary 6th Sep 16, 8:01 AM
    • 681 Posts
    • 291 Thanks
    wary
    I intend to retire early once my current contract expires, which will depend on how long they keep extending me for. Pretty sure I won't be bored - certainly much less bored than I am at work. I may consider doing the odd contract over the winter months, but it will be to boost my retirement income rather than to ease boredom.
    • Malthusian
    • By Malthusian 7th Sep 16, 10:10 AM
    • 2,887 Posts
    • 4,127 Thanks
    Malthusian
    Got a panning off one reviewer:
    Originally posted by Bootsox
    I had a quick peruse of Amazon's "Look Inside" and just the use of Comic Sans in the chapter list is enough to put me off.

    The early parts of the book struck me as reasonably good advice for someone who hasn't thought about these things up till now, and I was about to admit that my prejudices were wrong. Then I skipped to the latter part of the book, and found that it turns into unashamed shilling for various retirement complexes and services around the US. ("By taking advantage of all the amenities that Towerpoint RV Retirement Resort has going for itself..." and I kid you not, this is followed by an actual column-formatted list of the "Fifty-one activities you can enjoy at Towerpoint" including "horseshoes" and "flee market". Remember, you paid for this stuff.) Avoid because if it doesn't bore you with statements of the obvious it will annoy you once you get to this point and realise you've been conned into paying for a load of adverts for things you can't even buy.

    Back on topic: I can't fathom why people retire when they don't know what they're going to do with their time instead, no matter how old they are. Being bored at work is 100x better than being bored at home.
    • Gers
    • By Gers 7th Sep 16, 10:45 AM
    • 5,769 Posts
    • 33,593 Thanks
    Gers
    I 'retired' last year aged 61 years, although perhaps 'ceased to work full time' is a better way of explaining it.

    I receive a final salary occupational pension and have no real financial worries but have returned to the job market as I felt able and willing to do some more - just not in the toxic and draining work environment I was in. Now I work part part time and can do most of it when it suits me. This year I've been offered some FE teaching again and have agreed - half a day a week!

    My time away from work is lovely, I travel abroad and in the UK and do pretty much what takes my fancy. My volunteer work is doing patient transport (rural area) and PVG forms for a local sports club, can't see myself in a charity shop or WI etc. Loving life. It's gone too soon so now it's my time!
    • BLB53
    • By BLB53 7th Sep 16, 10:56 AM
    • 1,107 Posts
    • 890 Thanks
    BLB53
    'retired' does not mean never do any work ever again...but for me, more that I have reached a stage where paid work is optional but not compulsory.

    I must however concede that without the previous structure of the working week, I do struggle with periods of boredom and find myself scanning these sorts of forums to engage with some like minded people who also seem to have quite a bit of spare time.
    If you choose index funds you can never outperform the market.
    If you choose managed funds there's a high probability you will underperform index funds.
    • robin61
    • By robin61 7th Sep 16, 11:05 AM
    • 554 Posts
    • 436 Thanks
    robin61
    Is the book not written for the American Market?

    Got a panning off one reviewer:
    Originally posted by Bootsox
    There are many more positive reviews than negative. So most seem to have enjoyed it.
    Anyway, yes it's written by an American but for me there is a lot which works in the UK.
    But you can't please all of the people all of the time. I guess life would be boring if we all liked the same things.
    Last edited by robin61; 07-09-2016 at 1:38 PM.
    The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money.
    • Clifford_Pope
    • By Clifford_Pope 7th Sep 16, 6:23 PM
    • 3,333 Posts
    • 3,387 Thanks
    Clifford_Pope
    It's a bit sad to spend such a large part of your life working, retire, and then realise you haven't actually got a real life to enjoy so go back to work again.
    It suggests an absense of hinterland
    • mgdavid
    • By mgdavid 7th Sep 16, 6:33 PM
    • 5,206 Posts
    • 4,374 Thanks
    mgdavid
    It's a bit sad to spend such a large part of your life working, retire, and then realise you haven't actually got a real life to enjoy so go back to work again.
    It suggests an absense of hinterland
    Originally posted by Clifford_Pope
    masterful understatement !!
    A salary slave no more.....
    • molerat
    • By molerat 7th Sep 16, 6:51 PM
    • 17,015 Posts
    • 11,194 Thanks
    molerat
    I retired over 7 years ago at 54y 11m and have not had a single inkling to go back to work even though I have had unsolicited offers of full and part time work.
    www.helpforheroes.org.uk/donations.html
    • ex-pat scot
    • By ex-pat scot 7th Sep 16, 6:57 PM
    • 205 Posts
    • 224 Thanks
    ex-pat scot

    Back on topic: I can't fathom why people retire when they don't know what they're going to do with their time instead, no matter how old they are. Being bored at work is 100x better than being bored at home.
    Originally posted by Malthusian

    I would paraphrase you as "Being paid to be bored (at work) is 100x better than paying to be bored at home".




    I love Ermine's quote at "Simple Living in Suffolk" -


    (I paraphrase)


    "the trick is to Retire TO, not Retire FROM".
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