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  • mussgo
    • #2
    • 12th Aug 07, 9:01 AM
    • #2
    • 12th Aug 07, 9:01 AM
    I dont know where those figures came from but as I am paying over 25 a month, that makes over 300. With just three check ups a year for the past two years this is not money well spent!

    Considering I one of those times I had to wait best part of an hour to be seen I was not best pleased!
  • droodleskins
    • #3
    • 29th Aug 07, 1:14 PM
    • #3
    • 29th Aug 07, 1:14 PM
    If you knew that you need some work done .. maybe a new crown but could wait a few months before getting the work done ?

    thanks.
  • cazmeg
    • #4
    • 11th Jan 08, 7:26 PM
    • #4
    • 11th Jan 08, 7:26 PM
    Has anyone got any recommendations for family dental insurance cover?
  • Toothsmith
    • #5
    • 11th Jan 08, 9:06 PM
    • #5
    • 11th Jan 08, 9:06 PM
    I know that 'Money' is really Martin's job, but this article concentrates a little bit to much on that one aspect.

    The REAL way to 'Slash' the cost of your dental care is to look after your teeth.

    It's not rocket science.

    Sugar, eaten too frequently (a tiny amount several times a day does more damage that a box of Mars Bars eaten all at once once a week!) will rot teeth. Plaque, allowed to build up on teeth surfaces will give you gum disease.

    So, sensible diet, good oral hygine and regular visits to a good preventative dentist and hygienist will - over the long term, keep your dental bills to a minimum.

    Putting £20 into a bank account, and only looking for a dentist when you feel something has gone wrong is the fast bus to dentures.

    Plus - if you try self insuring and have an accident, you could well find yourself thousands of pounds short (The last accident case I did was a 52yr old lady who slipped on her own doorstep and her insurance claim - paid by her Denplan Policy with no quibbles - was £4575) It's not just rugby players who have dental accidents - in fact, I don't think I've treated a rugby injury in over 10 years - they all are sensible enough to wear dentist-made gum shields!

    Going abroad is fraught with dangers - and still means that you've let yourself get into a right state in the first place.

    Insurance policies are great, but watch the 'maximums'. Check that you will have cover enough to go to your chosen dentist a couple of times a year, see the hygienist 2-3 times a year.

    But the big thing is to find a decent dentist and to go regularly and to listen to and act on the advice you are given.

    Find a dentist when things feel fine - not when you are screaming in agony and have a face like a football.

    If you only ever make 'distress purchases' of dentistry (ie only go when you have a problem) you will be at the mercy of the first dentist with a space in his appointment book. The chances of that being the best/most reasonabley priced/most caring dentist in the area are probably slim.

    There are not enough dentists in this country to cater for everybody.

    As more and more dentists go private, they see less and less people.

    There are enough people in the country who value decent dentistry and care enough about their teeth to keep the decent dentists busy. (We need less than half the population).

    If you want a decent dentist, then get looking and find them. Get on their books and go regularly.

    Do not accept dentists who rush, dentists who aren't up front with their fees, dentists who don't explain things properly, dentists who accept you as 'NHS' patients but then tell you that most things can only be done privately. Look for nice clean practices, well maintained waiting areas and friendly efficient staff.

    When you find such places, register there and go regularly.

    THAT is the way to slash you lifetime dental bills.


    Oh - and avoid invasive 'cosmetic' dentistry. It all looks good on the 'after' shots on '10 Years Younger' but they never seem to explain that all that expensive dentistry will cost thousands in maintenance costs over the rest of that patients lifetime.

    If your teeth are good, then leave them alone. if they're a bit squiffy then so what?? Do we all want to look like Americans? Nothing wrong with a bit of whitening (If done professionally by a qualified dentist). Or even the odd bit of white filling bonded on to close a gap or two, but do not let anybody near them wth a drill just to make them look better
    Last edited by Toothsmith; 11-01-2008 at 9:11 PM.
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
  • Alfrescodave
    • #6
    • 11th Jan 08, 10:13 PM
    • #6
    • 11th Jan 08, 10:13 PM
    Excellent advice from Toothsmith; when I visit my dentist she is always encouraging me to have work done - none of it is essential but more of a cosmetic nature. Yes my teeth would look better with work done on them but at a cost of several hundreds of pounds per tooth!. I need my teeth fixed when they are "broke" otherwise leave them alone.

    With less people going to the dentist then I feel that those that do go are being "conned" to have non essential costly treatment. I'm now strongly considering looking for an alternative dentist.
  • pinkpong
    • #7
    • 11th Jan 08, 10:28 PM
    • #7
    • 11th Jan 08, 10:28 PM
    I was forced to go privat as having 4 dentist within 2years, they were all C**p!. I have no problem with teeth but my daughter has. They messed her up for somany months , puting fillings were they should not. She ended up on antibiotics for 3 month before I got P****d off. I took her to a dentist hosp., where they simply pulled her bad tooth out . They were just simply afraid to pull it out. What dentists hey. She was 9 then, Could not find a decent dentist. As you only have one set of teeth I think it`s worth paying. I have HSA Just me and my 3kids. I can claim up to 70 each, which I do every year. I have been very please with that, claim is very fast. I claim 70 for their glasses too, which I would have not bought for them if I didn`t have the insurance. My hubby haven`t had dentist check up for 40 years. But last year had his tooth pulled out and a treatmet came to about 90 which is not bad for 40 years.
  • Toothsmith
    • #8
    • 12th Jan 08, 7:37 AM
    • #8
    • 12th Jan 08, 7:37 AM
    One thing I missed - DON'T SMOKE.

    If you do, then practically any money you spend on your teeth is money down the drain. They will fall out anyway.
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
  • tankard
    • #9
    • 18th Jan 08, 2:34 PM
    • #9
    • 18th Jan 08, 2:34 PM
    Hello Toothsmith, I have just spent some time reading through all the posts, and all the articles, and getting quotes from the various insurers, and I am confused.

    What we are looking for is this:
    We are a couple, late 50s, looking for Dental Cover, to go towards the high prices of Private Treatment (we have a dentist).

    Boots, Tesco, HSA, and so on. Which should I select please...
  • Toothsmith
    I don't know enough about the differences in cover I'm afraid.

    I fix teeth. Your own dentist is best placed to know your likely treatment needs, and so he/she could suggest a sensible amount of cover that you're likely to need. You can then select the policy based on that.

    Denists aren't financial advisors, so technically, we shouldn't really give advice on insurance products at all. (Unless we get a - very expensive- consumer credit license). Things like Denplan are capitation products, technically not insurance, so we are OK to recommend things like that, but the Tesco, Boots, HSA etc products ARE insurance, so we can't really comment.
    Last edited by Toothsmith; 18-01-2008 at 4:59 PM.
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
  • nikeel
    Hi all

    I was wondering if anyone knew if it was possible to get dental insurance which would cover me for already existing problems.

    I've been told I need root canal and crowns which will cost upwards of 500!!

    Most websites I have looked at do not provide cover for pre-existing conditions.

    Any help would be gratrefully recieved.

    Thanks
  • someoldbloke
    up here in darkest st andrews i am sc--wed for 46.12 a month for myself and "her who must be obeyed "to have check ups and fillings ! with anything like crowns not covered. but only were offered this one policy from practice and am worried if i cancel we will lose dentist . They are like hens teeth up here ! some old bloke
  • helen slimmond
    I had terrible toothache and signed on the dotted line for isoplan without thinking.
    I think I could get more with insurance can I get out of it?
  • Toothsmith
    For that sort of thing normally it's 21 days notice to stop. I would keep it going until you get set up with your alternative though - you never know!
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
  • norbie
    Hi,

    I have been to the dentist today and he says that I need 4 fillings as I have weak teeth

    I have made 4 appointments that spread out across June and July. The total cost will be 380.

    I am looking into dental insurance - I really can't afford to pay that much money for the work to be done, but obviously it must happen.

    I have looked at the various dental insurances but am a bit confused as only the expensive ones give you money back for work like fillings, and a lot of them will not let you claim for pre-booked treatment. After these fillings I won't need much else done so I don't want to get stuck into a long-term contract if possible.

    After some advice here, many thanks.
  • Chopper98
    Hi,
    I too have just been to the dentists after arriving home from spending a year in Canada. I have been told I need 2 fillings and a Crown, for this and an x-ray I have been quoted 741 quid!! Is this a reasonable private treatment charge for this work?? I have to pay 42 quid for each appointment just to get through the door which gets up my nose.

    I honestly don't know what to do for the best, I understand most insurance companies won't touch you if you have treatment planned.

    I stay clear of sweets almost religiously since I was a kid but my girlfriend bought me a toffee, I ate it as I didn't want to seem rude and wouldn't you know it, it pulled my root filling. So 430 quid for a crown due to one toffee.....Add to that that my other filling is apparently due to the fact that i've been brushing too vigorously (ironic considering I was always told I don't brush enough) and i'm a little frustrated.

    Never again will anything remotely toffee like pass my lips!!!

    Anyone got any advice on how I could possibly claim any of this money back? Thankfully I start a new job on tuesday otherwise I would be utterly screwed.

    Thanks all
  • Ronnie4ds
    I need a crown replacing and some white fillings needed.

    I'm a 35yr old male with no children.
    Which is the best plan or policy for me to go for or should I go overseas for cosmetic work as i cant get on the NHS where i live.

    I dont mind waiting a few months if there is a plan that accepts crowns and white fillings.

    Can someone please help me out here..

    Thanks,
    Ronnie.
  • Niemand
    I have a question.

    I went to the dentist today. It wasn't my usual dentist, but it was in the same practice. He seemed very irritated, not with me, but with the Government! Usually when I walk in it's a case of "Please take a seat" and he'll ask me questions. Today, he started talking about costs. Asked me if I was NHS, if I was receiving benefit, and to tell him what the problem was. I explained I had a painful tooth last week which had all but gone only because I wasn't really eating on that side of the mouth. He then said, "Well, I can have a look but it will be 44.60 minimum, do you want to think about it?" I said I needed it to be looked at (I knew a check-up was 16.20 and I believe he was telling me that work would cost 44.60).

    Anyway, he had a quick look, told me I had a cracked filling and that it needed a crown. Cost: 198.00. He explained 80% of the tooth was filling and a repair wouldn't last long.

    Two questions.

    1. He looked only at the offending tooth, for my 16.20 should I have had a proper check up? I believe I should. Apparently, the 16.20 is deducted from the 198.00. If I go ahead, should I insist on a check up?

    2. Is there anything I can do to lessen the cost of the crown?

    I notice that Martin's Dental Insurance page has the wrong figures for the charge bands. I've e-mailed Martin about this. The charges today are:

    Band 1: 16.20 - check up, scale and polish, X-rays, advice, prescription
    Band 2: 44.60 - Fillings, root canal treatment, extractions, denture additions, (this also includes all Band 1 items)
    Band 3: 198.00 - crowns, bridges, inlays, dentures, (this also includes all Band 1 and Band 2 items)
    Niemand
  • Toothsmith
    You should have a proper check up before any work, especially if you've not had one for a while.

    A tooth really should be x-rayed before something major like a crown as well - especially if it's so broken down, in order to check there are no hidden problems.

    If it's been a while since you've been, then a clean up could also be included in the £198 fee.

    If he does do a check up, and finds anything else wrong, then this should also be repaired in with that £198 fee.

    Probably that's why he doesn't want to look!
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
  • Niemand
    Thanks for that.

    Would it make any difference that I was booked in as an "emergency"?

    I phoned last Wednesday because my tooth was aching and I wanted an appointment as soon as possible. They gave me today's appointment. They classed it as an emergency because they fitted me in to a five-minute slot. I have a feeling that if I mention the lack of a check up he'll say he didn't have time and saw me because I had complained of toothache. Do you think he'd be justified in doing that?
    Niemand
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