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  • FIRST POST
    • JimmyTheWig
    • By JimmyTheWig 16th Apr 12, 1:53 PM
    • 11,304Posts
    • 11,004Thanks
    JimmyTheWig
    Where has all the water gone?
    • #1
    • 16th Apr 12, 1:53 PM
    Where has all the water gone? 16th Apr 12 at 1:53 PM
    Ok, we've had little rainfall this year.
    So we've got a hosepipe ban.

    But I saw an advert earlier about it saying that the problem was that we've had low rainfall for the last two years.

    So where has it all gone?
    From what I was told about in school, there is a water cycle.
    It rains.
    Water evaporates and forms clouds.
    It rains.
    etc.

    Are they seriously saying that for the last two years the amount of water up in the sky has been growing? I find that really hard to believe.

    Or is it that the water hasn't been evaporating as much. In which case it must all still be here somewhere.

    So where is it?
Page 2
    • Andy_WSM
    • By Andy_WSM 17th Apr 12, 1:34 PM
    • 1,998 Posts
    • 4,420 Thanks
    Andy_WSM
    A drought has just been called in my region, but typically, we've had more rain so far April this year than last. (Mention drought and it always rains!)

    You can see from the graphs on my weather station page: www.wsmweather.co.uk (Not commercial, it's a hobby site / home weather station) that the winter was particualrly dry in this region though and that last years rainfall was way below average - it is the lack of long term rainfall that is catching up with us now.
    • david39
    • By david39 17th Apr 12, 2:01 PM
    • 1,882 Posts
    • 1,524 Thanks
    david39
    The reason we don't spend -millions on new reservoirs or desalination plants or fleets of shiny new snow-moving equipment shacked up in compounds all over the country is because most of the time we don't need them.

    The truth is that we don't spend money on plant and equipment and facilities that are used just very occasionally. It doesn't make economic sense.

    In Scandinavia they need the snow moving equipment because their climate produces heavy snowfall every winter and it sticks around for weeks - in the Middle East, they have desalination plants because they have a large population and significantly less rainfall than we do.

    This country manages to struggle through 5 days of snow and ice without too many set backs and we will, no doubt, see our way through this drought other than for a few parched lawns and wilting border plants.

    Would you rather suffer that once or twice every 10 years or so, or pay large increases in your local authority and/or water rates permanently?
  • sharpy2010
    Tell me you are joking?
    Originally posted by penrhyn
    No, why would I be. Not everyone knows everything.
    • pine77
    • By pine77 17th Apr 12, 3:29 PM
    • 134 Posts
    • 12 Thanks
    pine77
    Its extremely expensive to run and would bring higher bills, the far east use it as oil is something silly like 10p a litre,but its something that may well happen if the drought continues or becomes more common
    Originally posted by deanos
    Actually most Greek Islands rely on desalination and their bills are far lower than ours..

    What raises bills in the uk is pipe repair work.
    • alleycat`
    • By alleycat` 17th Apr 12, 3:29 PM
    • 1,751 Posts
    • 1,526 Thanks
    alleycat`
    The reason we don't spend -millions on new reservoirs or desalination plants or fleets of shiny new snow-moving equipment shacked up in compounds all over the country is because most of the time we don't need them.

    Would you rather suffer that once or twice every 10 years or so, or pay large increases in your local authority and/or water rates permanently?
    Originally posted by david39

    I don't live in the south or south east but you cannot continue to shovel that number of people into such a small (relative) area and not start planning for reservoirs (and / or) desalination (or equivalent).

    Even the water companies are actively looking at some of the above as they know they are going to struggle going forward.

    They wouldn't be doing anything to spend money (shareholders and all that) unless they knew that this was going to be a long term issue.
    • HappyMJ
    • By HappyMJ 17th Apr 12, 3:51 PM
    • 20,454 Posts
    • 17,001 Thanks
    HappyMJ
    Actually most Greek Islands rely on desalination and their bills are far lower than ours..

    What raises bills in the uk is pipe repair work.
    Originally posted by pine77
    Their bills are lower as the greek government subsidizes the bills. The actual cost of running a desalination plant costs a lot more than the cost of water in the UK.

    Regular savers earn 6% interest (HSBC, First Direct, M&S) Loans cost 2.9% per year (Nationwide) = FREE money.
    • pine77
    • By pine77 17th Apr 12, 4:13 PM
    • 134 Posts
    • 12 Thanks
    pine77
    Athens and Salonika Water authorities are part public part private.

    Most the desalination plants on the islands are private ventures.
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