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    • kazwookie
    • By kazwookie 24th Sep 08, 2:40 PM
    • 8,374 Posts
    • 107,809 Thanks
    kazwookie
    • #2
    • 24th Sep 08, 2:40 PM
    • #2
    • 24th Sep 08, 2:40 PM
    When was the gas fire last serviced?
    35 to go. 35 already gone
    (5 stone to get rid off in total)
  • ormus
    • #3
    • 24th Sep 08, 3:04 PM
    • #3
    • 24th Sep 08, 3:04 PM
    i seem to remember, it should be a blue flame and not yellow.
    yellow is a sign of incomplete burning and a possible carbon monoxide problem.
    deadly.
    Get some gorm.
  • Pssst
    • #4
    • 24th Sep 08, 3:19 PM
    • #4
    • 24th Sep 08, 3:19 PM
    The ideal on a normal radiant gas fire in order of preference is blue, blue with yellow flickers, yellow so yes, sounds ok. Gas fires that are regularly used should be serviced properly every year IMHO.
  • Sailor Sam
    • #5
    • 24th Sep 08, 3:30 PM
    • #5
    • 24th Sep 08, 3:30 PM
    As a basic guide, yellow is bad, blue is good.
  • EliteHeat
    • #6
    • 24th Sep 08, 7:58 PM
    • #6
    • 24th Sep 08, 7:58 PM
    Some decorative gas fires are designed to have a yellow flame in order to simulate a real fire more accurately. Radiant fires should have a blueish flame.

    By far the most important thing to look for is any sign of sooting on or around the fire. If you see any evidence of this, turn it off and do not use it until it has been thoroughly checked / serviced.
  • TimBuckTeeth
    • #7
    • 24th Sep 08, 8:50 PM
    • #7
    • 24th Sep 08, 8:50 PM
    It may appear more orange/yellow after it has heated up due to the firebricks or coals becoming red hot. A blue flame will be noticeable when first switched on but become somewhat masked by the glow when hot.

    As mentioned above a yellow flame is not good and blue is normal. However if there has been a change then you should get it checked to make sure it is working correctly. Check that any vents in the room are not blocked.
    • andrew-b
    • By andrew-b 25th Sep 08, 1:04 PM
    • 2,496 Posts
    • 3,573 Thanks
    andrew-b
    • #8
    • 25th Sep 08, 1:04 PM
    • #8
    • 25th Sep 08, 1:04 PM
    I would recommend getting a carbon monoxide detector like this one which we have:

    http://www.trustcorgi.com/consumer/buyacarbonmonoxidealarm.htmx

    ...then you have the peace of mind of being warned if your gas fire (or any gas burning appliance) is likely to kill you by carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Andy
    • septemberblues
    • By septemberblues 25th Sep 08, 1:26 PM
    • 807 Posts
    • 3,389 Thanks
    septemberblues
    • #9
    • 25th Sep 08, 1:26 PM
    • #9
    • 25th Sep 08, 1:26 PM
    i seem to remember, it should be a blue flame and not yellow.
    yellow is a sign of incomplete burning and a possible carbon monoxide problem.
    deadly.
    Originally posted by ormus
    Yep, absolutely right. I've got a leaflet in front of me now from CORGI about carbon monoxide poisoning............"A yellow orange flame is evidence of possible carbon monoxide presence" and "A healthy flame should be crisp, vibrant and blue".
    KEEP CALM AND keep taking the tablets
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